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Re: down to the floor

Subject: Re: down to the floor
by bencole on 2003/8/29 3:18:24

Quote:

kabutoki wrote:
please correct me if i´m wrong here !
as far as i saw and trained there are hardly any techniqes covering groundfighting in the bujinkan.


It is important to remember that the principles of Taijutsu apply just as much on the ground as they do standing.

I've heard people say that you need to train in BJJ to understand how to train on the ground. That is simply not true at all, though training in BJJ (just as training in boxing, Judo, or Kung Fu) opens one's eyes to the potential attacks you could face from other arts. This itself is enlightening!

What people need to understand is that the spinework, hipwork and kneework (extension or not) that is used to generate power in punching or throw larger opponents while standing is EXACTLY the same as that used on the ground to free the hips, create space to execute techniques or escape, and so on. People need to understand this, and WORK to understand it.

Many times such "basic" things as mechanics and structure are forgotten when teaching/learning. We go through movements, or watch our teachers go through movements, without actually UNDERSTANDING what is happening.

Those who have lived in Japan have seen Soke "shrimp" a la BJJ when on the ground. Did he say, "This is shrimping. Everyone spend ten minutes at the beginning of every practice doing this"? No. We're big boys now, and if we have the eyes, we should be able to pick out the lessons that we need to work on. Is shrimping written in the scrolls? Most probably not, imo. But are the lessons of shrimping enveloped within all the techniques in the scrolls? Yes, imo.

This illustrates the danger of kata collecting, imo. Do you need to have an official waza starting from a pinned position to work the lessons? Of course not. Does the lack of such a technique mean there is no groundwork in the art? Of course not.

Instead of mindlessly shrimping up and down a dojo, however, it is imperative that people understand the structural and physical dynamics that make shrimping the same as punching, which is the same as throwing. Once this point becomes ingrained in you, you are well on your way to understanding the Bujinkan arts, imo.

Only after this point has been digested should you THEN think about how all the Fudoza and Seiza techniques in the scrolls ALSO teach the lessons of the ground.

Eschew kata comparisons.
Examine principles of movement.
Then train them--whether standing, sitting, prone, in water, etc.

-ben
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