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Re: In Search of Kuri Katsu Restaurant in Noda-shi
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That's the place. Definitely need a to go box there. Thanks Elizabeth!

Posted on: 2009/11/19 6:02
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In Search of Kuri Katsu Restaurant in Noda-shi
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(Moderators, if there is a better place for this please feel free to move it.)

Hello Everyone,

On my trips to Japan I like to visit this little hole in the wall restaurant in Noda-shi that serves kuir katsu (or is that katsu kuri) Unfortunately I canno remember the name of the place. I know it is on the same road as the library but a little ways further away from the main drag. I have a student who is making his first trip to Japan soon and I think he would like itg. If any of you know the name of the place or have any photos of it, I would greatly appreciate you sharingit with me.

Thanks,
John Hidalgo

Posted on: 2009/11/18 3:31
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Re: The Red Belt
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Hi Elizabeth,

I was looking at it from the standpoint that, as I understand, you are Canadian and I assume that at some point int the future you will be coming back to North America to visit family and friends. The idea being that we could catch you while you were on this side of the Pacific and coordinate travel that way (much as has been done when we have hosted Shawn Gray). Airfare across North America is much cheaper than airfare from Tokyo to Austin.

There is another consideration. I do not know what rank these Japanese women hold. It is my understanding that Hatsumi-sensei does not want Japanese shihan teaching overseas. I do not know how that would come into play (if at all) with the Japanese female practitioners.

Take care,
John

Posted on: 2009/10/11 18:51
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Re: Bujinkan Wiki Pros and Cons. Thoughts anyone?
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For the record, I have touched base with George Ohashi on this. He advised that Hatsumi-soke generally does not approve of anything being on the internet. Based on that discussion I am not going to pursue a wiki project further. I will say that in that discussion George was very patient and helpful.

That being said there is something that I would like to touch on:

"Not a benefit to anyone,"

To be very honest, this came off to me as being very condescending and dismissive. I don't know if that is what you intended but that is certainly how it came across.

To provide a bit more context, if you saw the work that I have been doing for the last few years and where that work was going you would better see how having access to some sort of a Bujinkan wiki would have been a major benefit. It has taken a lot of hunting and researching and, yes, asking my instructor. Admittedly, some of the stuff I am working on is rather granular and in such cases the "ask your instructor" approach doesn't always work. That is a good answer for most things but not everything. My instructor is Brian Tritico. Currently he is a full time student and very, very, very busy. Additionally, he lives almost a couple of hundred miles away from me. Given the bulk and need for detail that I am trying to achieve, having a place like a wiki to get input from experienced practitioners from around the world make that work a lot easier. I am sure that I am not the only person who would benefit from having such access.

As I said before, I am not going to pursue a wiki any further. I'll continue my research as I have been doing.

I think that it might be worthwhile to look at how we use the "ask your instructor" answer to people's questions. Certainly that is the appropriate answer for many questions, but it too can also come off as condescending and dismissive (and not very helpful). And let's be honest, even the most accessible and knowledgeable instructors are not encyclopedias. That and they are not always able to ask questions for their instructors (whom a number are Japanese shihan) about every question that comes along. If "ask your instructor" is the only answer that we are going to give people then we really have no need for Kutaki.org or other such resources. So let's be a little more considerate about how we use "ask your instructor".

Take care
John

Posted on: 2009/10/11 18:13
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Re: The Red Belt
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Thanks Elizabeth. Yes, as soon as you said something I thought to myself "Bad, Joh,. You didn't get back to Elizabeth". Thanks for your being patient with me.

"There are some amazing Japanese women"

It is a real shame that we never hear almost nothing about them. I have a female student that has gone to a couple of seminars in Houston where she has met a couple of female black belts. I can tell you that it was a huge motivator for her. She is already a votivated student and a lot of fun to train with but listenting to her bring that point up several times I could tell that seeing other women in this art was a major boost for her.

On that note, how would you feel about coming to Texas to teach a seminar sometime?

Tkae care,
John

Posted on: 2009/10/11 18:07
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Re: The Red Belt
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Hi Elizabeth,

My apologies for any oversight. I had meant to address each of you in separate posts. I got to Mark and then work took over (Had a bunch of network tickets come in all at once.). I work 3rd shift (11 PM to 7 AM). The oversight was not intentional and not meant as any slight towards you.

As I am not a woman there are things that I will never know. That being the case, I am sure that the purple gi can have connotations for which I would not have the background to consider.

"When you're here, let's train. Celebrate training"

Absolutely! I hope to make it back in the next year or so. It would be nice to finally meet you in person after all the e-mail and internet correspondence.

Take care,
John

Posted on: 2009/10/11 17:23
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Re: The Red Belt
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Hi Mark,

When I started about 25 years ago (man, has it been that long?) the purple gi was much more common. The official word as we heard it (as much as official gets in the Bujinkan) is that women had two options:

Option 1) wear the back uniform with the appropriate rank belt (white, green or black just like the men do

or

Option 2) Wear a purple uniform with a read belt.

So, as someone who was around when that uniform standard was more prevalent, seeing a red belt with a black uniform does seem odd. So I was curious where that came from. Not a big deal at all. Just an observation.

Now I have heard two stories on why the purple gi and red belt came about in the first place. The first story I heard was that Mrs. Hatsumi was in charge of the women's training and the reason the women's uniforms were purple was because Mrs. Hatsumi like purple. That was it. Later I heard a second story where Mrs. Hatsumi overheard someone saying something disparaging about one of the female students so she had all the women dress the same way (purple gi and red obi) so that no one could tell what rank the female student was.

Having a uniform option for women is an anomaly in the martial arts world and the purple gi is certainly unique to the Bujinkan. On one hand it could almost be seen as an almost misogynistic throw back (though I don't think that was Mrs. Hatsumi's intent). On the other hand, men and women are different and there is something to be said for acknowledging (if not celebrating) those differences.

Like I said, I was just making an observation; a curiousity if you will. In the end analysis, the color of one’s belt or, for that matter, one’s gender is not really what matters. The real measure is their commitment to the art and the quality of their Taijutsu.

Posted on: 2009/10/11 16:49
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Re: Bujinkan Wiki Pros and Cons. Thoughts anyone?
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"Not a benefit to anyone,"

I do not understand how convenient access to information would not be a benefit. Please explain.

Posted on: 2009/10/11 0:49
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Re: Bujinkan Wiki Pros and Cons. Thoughts anyone?
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While generally I usually agree that "ask your teacher" is a good answer for many questions, there are some more granular things where that doesn't work as well. In the case of the curriculum I was creating for my student, there were kanji and the spelling of things that required a lot of hunting down. Such things I new my teacher did not know and was not going to have easy access to. Additionally there were terms that were a little more on the obscure side that again I was fairly certain would not know . Now this is no reflection of my instructor. He is actually one of the better and more knowledgeable instructors around.

As far as asking Hatsumi-soke, I think that would be great if he was readily accessible but honestly, he is not. I can't blame him. were I in his position I would want a certain measure of privacy. Perhaps the next time I am in Japan I might have an opportunity for such a question but that is going to be a while.

I hope that helps.

Take care,
John

Posted on: 2009/10/11 0:44
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The Red Belt
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As some of you may remember, way back in the day (I believe at Mrs. Hatsumi's direction) women were given an option to wear a purple uniform with a red belt or where the same black uniform with green or black belt (as men do). This is something that we still do in my class and my female students really like having the option (and really like the purple gi a lot).

Now there is something that I have seen over the last few years that strikes me as odd. I have seen women wearing the red belt with the black gi. So I am wondering when this came about. Was this something that came from Hatsumi-soke or his wife or did people start doing this on their own.

Anybody know anything about this?

Posted on: 2009/10/10 18:32
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