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Re: Sword Care
Kutaki Postmaster
Joined:
2003/10/21 10:34
From Wyoming
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村民 :: Villager
Posts: 226
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The use of rice paper may have to do with acid content. This is why aged (sometimes up to 10 years) ho wood is used for the tsuka and the saya. It is a non-acidic wood. The use of standard papers, even unbleached ones, may introduce acids that an individual does not want on the surface of one's blade, particularly if it is a blade of some value.

The same may be true for the use of the clove oil, but I am not sure on that point to be honest.

Cotton can still have dangerous effects on the finely polished surface of a notable sword. Seeing as a decent polish job on a blade is about 2-3k dollars, it is important to use materials that have a very, very, fine grit probably in the 3000 range or higher. This is also why premium uchiko is worth the price if you have invested large sums of money in a blade.

All of this comes via my iaido instructor whose instructor was a sword polisher to the imperial family when he was alive. So it is all based on the assumption that one's blade and fittings are in the $10,000+ range and more than likely in the $20,000+ range.

This also should not be immediately dismissed merely as excessive weapon worship, which I have heard some Bujinkan people do in order to excuse them fully understanding traditional processes. Hatsumi sensei says the things he says because he already understands the traditional methods thoroughly. Very few in the Bujinkan outside of Japan can claim that, and that certainly includes me.

So, the use of rice paper, uchiko, and choji oil is not one of tradition or not, it is one of functionality. Acid content and grit content are two of the major considerations. During kantei (sword appreciation and study), attendees are often asked to hold a fold of rice paper in their teeth to prevent them from getting any saliva on a blade or breathing excessively on the surfaces. That is the extent to which people will go to protect a quality blade.

Posted on: 2004/5/11 18:45
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Thanks
Kutaki Postmaster
Joined:
2003/10/21 10:34
From Wyoming
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 226
Offline
Oh,

The big puffy marshmallow style kanji will be perfect!!! Or not...

Actually, there are couple in that assortment that will work very well.

I mapped things out on the rock, and I am afraid that my piece will be too small for the detail vs. my currently unpracticed hands (been a while). So, I am ordering new stone! Bigger canvas, so to speak. When it is done, I will let you guys know

Posted on: 2004/2/17 6:28
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Re: Buyu kanji
Kutaki Postmaster
Joined:
2003/10/21 10:34
From Wyoming
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村民 :: Villager
Posts: 226
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Ohashi Sensei and Mr. Gray,

Thank you very much for your contributions. Each version will give me something to work from. I am really looking forward to working on this. I will be sure to mention to Craig Sensei that I received assistance from the both of you in this endeavor. He is a good man, and given my remote location, I have been amazingly fortunate to have found him in the same town.

I would be glad to post a picture. It will be simple. The soapstone is a red/brown variety that has some interesting pinks and greys when it is polished. This will be the first piece I have attempted in quite a few years.

Relief work is really pretty simple, though not necessarily easy. I just finished sawing the face of the stone. It is a small plaque or piece. I do this under a running faucet and it shows some of the color that will emerge, very earthy. It will be about 6 inches tall by about 4 inches wide, suitable for a bookshelf placement.

Once again, thank you very much

Glenn Manry

Posted on: 2004/2/16 12:26
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Buyu kanji
Kutaki Postmaster
Joined:
2003/10/21 10:34
From Wyoming
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Hello all,

Long story short, I am reintroducing myself to sculpture and soapstone carving. Also, I have recently begun to study iaido in addition to my Bujinkan studies. My sensei is to soon have a nice Japanese style dinner for us, his students. I want to make a nice gift for him.

So, I was going to carve Buyu for him on a soapstone plaque. Unfortunately, I can't find any kanji that aren't brushed and therefore not entirely clear to me.

Can anyone provide some nice simple kanji for Buyu (warrior friend, not courageous warrior)? Thank you in advance.

In case anyone is somehow worried, our relationship is a becoming a little more like friends in addition to me being a student of iaido. So, I think the gift is appropriate in this context.

Posted on: 2004/2/15 13:09
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Re: Wyoming/Nebraska area
Kutaki Postmaster
Joined:
2003/10/21 10:34
From Wyoming
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 226
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Hello,

I am establishing a Shibu in Sheridan, WY, and I also know of a training group in South Dakota. You can email me at gmanry@fiberpipe.net if you are interested in more information.

Glenn Manry

Posted on: 2003/10/21 10:36
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