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Re: Being "good" at budo...
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Quote:

jhealy wrote:
If you're focusing on "BBT-derived goshinjutsu", then you're doing just that: you're focusing on something that's derived from BBT, not on BBT itself. Toshindo, for example, is a derivative of BBT but I'm willing to bet there aren't many people here who would equate it with BBT - and rightly so since a derivative of something, while related, is not the thing itself. If the derivative involves any pruning (for example, excluding the "text book" forms, ignoring fundamentals, etc) then the orignal is lost because it can't be unambiguously reconstructed from the derivative.

If you take a few principles from an art, ignore the rest of it and then take it in your own direction I don't think you can rightly claim to be studying that art. You're just using part of it as a jumping off point for doing your own thing. There's nothing wrong with that if you're honest about what you're doing (essentially creating your own school), but I really don't think you can properly claim to be studing the art you took the principles from - especially if those principles (like natural relaxed movement, controlling space, staying covered, etc) are not unique to that art.

I think that if you really want to study an art, you need to accept that it is what it is and study it. If you want to use parts of it as a jumping off point that's fine as well. I don't think either approach is right or wrong but they really are different from each another.

So it has nothing to do with being stuck in 1540. To me it has to do with wanting to study the art itself as opposed to wanting to do my own thing based on a partial understanding of it. To me, the former is a much greater challenge.


I'm not suggesting that any of the art as it is should be ignored long term, and I'm not suggesting creating my own art, and perhaps 'BBT-derived' does not really make my point clear.

Dale put it much better when he said that his goshinjutsu is more like teaching the kihon AS goshinjutsu.

Over the years you get to see a gazillion axamples of what karateka call 'bunkai', which is, perversely to my mind, not an extant term in BBT, because the whole klux in my opinion is in the 'application'. What many of you perceive as mastering the kihon, is no more than making the kihon work in a dojo setting against practioners of the same art doing the same predictable attacks, even if not always in a predictable order, but with no proof, from the highest level practitioners, that any of it works against skilled practitioners of other fighting styles, and if someone did Muay Thai or Judo 20 years ago and are now thoroughly idoctrinated into the Buj way of doing things then this doesn't count, because their leg kicks and shimewaza aren't likely to be as hot as they used to be.

What I am talking about, is 'temporarily' taking some practical ideas that can be used short term as useable goshinjutsu, to make sure your students are physically capable of making it to future lessons, where these basics will be finely honed, and the true myriad teachings of the nine schools revealed to them.

I don't think anyone can argue that we need 2010 skills, even if those skills were first laid down in densho form in 1540.

I hope this make sense even though I have consumed an unwise quantity of a cheeky little red this evening.

Posted on: 2010/11/16 7:01
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Re: Bowing Ceremony?
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Quote:

RJHIII wrote:
Quote:

Damien wrote:
Now, I have yet to visit Japan, but I'm hoping to make my first venture in the upcoming year. Before I go, I plan on getting as much advise as possible from friends who frequest Japan. But from what I understand (and I may be wrong), the bowing ceremony is common practice in Japan. So despite personal feelings on the matter, it might be good to have it in a dojo for educational purposes.


I don't understand what you mean?

Bowing is a part of Japanese culture and life. It doesn't just happen in the dojo.


You know exactly what he means, the old Chicken Harajuku.....etc.

Posted on: 2010/11/16 6:43
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Re: Makiwara
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Quote:

Papa-san wrote:
push-ups done from the knuckles works well on the wrists and if you ever have to milk a cow without the milking machines they use now you will definitely develop hand strength, LOL.


However, there are a lot of people in this art who apparently so something similiar, but without a cow, but they don't seem to have great hand strength even though they are popularly held to be complete milkers.

Posted on: 2010/11/16 6:38
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Re: Being "good" at budo...
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Quote:

Yamazu wrote:
I kinda don't see why these 1540 model and Goshinjutsu model might need to cancel each other out... The way I see it we should start from the 1540's, and then we may Goshinjutsufy it as much as we feel the need.

But, in my point of view, the 1540's needs to be there to keep the things in perspective, or soon one might find oneself doing some other type of thing completely.

After 25 years of training I still haven't found there's something missing.... Keep on going, as it is said



I don't disagree, I just believe that the skills required to survive today if need be, even if rudimentary, are more important than 600 year old kata waza in the early days of a student's training.

Get some basic goshinjutsu down with some kihon, just in case the student needs it on the way home, and then over time fine tune it, build some of the full curriculum into it, add techniques, henka, finer principles etc, and then finally as a nice-to-have, look at the material which is interesting but not very useful.

But this is only if the student's reason for training is leaning towards self protection. If they are just doing it for fun or fantasy, or out of genuine historical interest without caring about modern day application, then fair enough, it is up to them, but they mustn't complain when they get knocked on their backside.

Posted on: 2010/11/13 8:34
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Re: Being "good" at budo...
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I think BBT has pretty much everything you need for modern times, it just isn't trained often enough with modern times in mind.

It is not unreasonable to assume that in 1600AD they were not clinging to 1400AD ways of doing things, and it is only the massive leaps in technology and life in general in the latter half of the 20th and early 21st century, that make people uncomfortable leaving all the fascinating historical material behind, making their training something more akin to a hobby or academic historical study, rather than a living relevant evolving art.

Do modern armies study kenjutsu, naginata, kyjutsu, sojutsu? No.

If there had been automatic weapons, laser guided missiles, and air support in the sengoku jidai would we even have anything to study along the lines of what we have from that period? No.

People should really just come out of their respective closet and admit what their focus is. If you are stuck in 1540 trying to replicate what they were doing back then, then your own BBT toolbox cannot possibly end up as relevant and applicable as the practitioners who make BBT-derived goshinjutsu their primary focus.

And even then, yes it is a longer path than in some other arts before a student can handle themselves using real taijutsu principles, but how long? You would think 70 years by the way some people talk. The historical warrior lived in the now, and to survive each day would have focussed entirely on what they needed and nothing more.

Jeet Kune Do's motto is "Absorb what is useful, discard the rest".

BBT's motto seems to be "Try to absorb everything, some of it is not relevant but still interesting, and there is far too much material for you to ever be any good at a large proportion of it, and don't worry about sparring etc, or other martial arts or the modern world, just have faith, and when the time comes you will be transformed into the ultimate warrior and flow through your enemies like a knife through butter, trust me on this"

Personally I think Jeet Kune Do's approach would have been the approach of the musha shugyosha, but today people are such collectors that they don't want to discard anything, but this is a luxury of the modern world.

Posted on: 2010/11/13 4:55
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Re: Being "good" at budo...
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Try to think how your deep postures might or might not be practical or applicable in a scenario like this:

http://www.break.com/fights/trutv-siberiansurge.html

Actually there are some fairly low stable yet mobile postures in effect here, but look at aspects such as how what look like quite brutal tobi geri do not have any more than a momentary effect on the 'recipient'. I think some people would be shocked at how much punishment people can take and keep fighting, and our art isn't even one that focusses on knockout punches. This clip also shows that the bad guys can actually be more skilled than we sometimes assume the average street scumbag will be.

How would your training help you if you were one of the security guards shown here? Be honest, imagine yourself going into ichmonji, would you avoid be taken out from some angles?

Posted on: 2010/11/12 22:05
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Re: Which books would you recommend?
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Quote:

benkyoka wrote:
If you are publishing a reference book it should not contain mistakes. ?


Even our definitive reference book UFTOTS?

Apparently it has many, some even allegedly deliberate.


Posted on: 2010/10/24 21:25
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Re: Why does being a ninja make you more of a target?
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radarblip wrote:
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ElfTengu wrote:
I don't think that my question was answered because I just want to know if 'ka' can be added to 'jutsu' and still be correct Japanese and not some made-up gaijin term.


If it helps, Donn Draeger used the term 'bujutsuka' liberally in a number of his books. I have also seen it used in Japanese books and martial arts related publications. So, grammatically it would seem that adding 'ka' as a suffix to 'jutsu' is ok.



Thank you Adam, you splendid taijutsuka you!

If it's good enough for the late Mr Draeger (his 'ninjutsu' book notwithstanding) then it's good enough for me.

Now all I have to do is release a celebratory song to the tune of Kate Bush's 'Babooshka'.



(Ay, aah taijutsuka, taijutsuka, taijutsuka yay yah......)

Posted on: 2010/10/21 12:31
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Re: Why does being a ninja make you more of a target?
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I appreciate that taijutsu is not limited to X-kan usage, I also feel that 'budoka' puts us on the one hand at some pretentious level that most of us are not at, and on the other hand does not differentiate us from practitioners of other arts, most of which are gendai budo.

When I hear 'budoka' I do not automatically think 'Bujinkan Budoka' because it is too broad a term. And many BBT people practice other forms of budo such as kyudo etc.

But putting us somewhere in a camp of general taijutsu, even though it may also contain koryuha and modern interpretations of taijutsu would be more accurate and more likely to bring the assumption on forums etc that we are talking about people who practice the same art, and not Yagyu Shingan Ryu taijutsu for example.

I don't think that my question was answered because I just want to know if 'ka' can be added to 'jutsu' and still be correct Japanese and not some made-up gaijin term.

I am really not that worried about labels, but there must surely be a noun that fits the bill.


Posted on: 2010/10/21 5:45
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Re: Columbia Tai Kai Godan Test
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If one spars with muffins on a regular basis instead of expecting kata and unrealistic keiko to apply when faced with such a critical real life scenario then one will find that the muffins will comply, even if the presentation is not always up to scratch.

Posted on: 2010/10/21 5:34
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