Login
Username:

Password:

Remember me



Lost Password?

Register now!
Socialize
 

Recent Topics
Topic Replies Last Post
Wedding gift... can someone help me to translate it? 6 2018/6/30 20:50
Barga18
Aomori-Ken 0 2018/6/19 10:27
hanzo-tou
Certificates 0 2018/5/8 4:34
schistkicker
Home Project: Shadowbox 3 2018/4/25 21:44
roufus
Ichiba 0 2018/2/21 1:18
Dpinga
   All Posts (shunketsu)


« 1 ... 7 8 9 (10)


Slow-mo thing
Villager
Joined:
2007/4/9 15:25
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 97
Offline
Here's something that struck me from the Intuition II topic.

"About the slow motion thing I experienced it once when I was attacked by a bunch of construction workers in 1993 and everything was in slow motion for sometime. It got back to normal when I decided to get away. I did not even feel that I was stabbed."

Now I've read Peyton Quinn's stuff describing adrenal dump and how he has a system for unlocking martial arts skill even during such a state. I am just curious, how many of us on Kutaki have experienced this slow-mo thing during an actual attack? And how many have experienced it more than once? Care to describe your experiences? I am quite curious about such things...

Junjie

Posted on: 2007/6/6 15:55
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: APOLOGY
Villager
Joined:
2007/4/9 15:25
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 97
Offline
Seago Shihan,

I didn't join in the discussion on your post before it got locked. But there are somethings I'd like to say...

Quote:

dseago wrote:
The fact is that the Bujinkan does have enemies, people who hate it and would use any opportunity to discredit or damage it. I essentially handed them a loaded gun, then insisted they also take some extra ammunition.


Honestly, it would take a very small person to take your words and turn them into ammo. And let's face it, after some time they'll successfully find something else to bash us with.

As I read your original post, here's what happened to ME.

1) I enjoyed it. I still think it takes a certain level of creativity to be able to descibe a typical class in that way. Let's face it, the innuendos are clever. :)

2) Then I stopped to think about why would any teacher subject a female student to such an uncomfortable (to say the least) situation in class.

It's so obvious, right? We do that so that should they ever be put in a situation where they'd have to fight their way out for real, they'll have something they can use to save their a55 (literally speaking).

And that brings up to my mind questions about how to prepare a student for such a situation in the best way possible to be ready to deal with such an extreme situation. Whatever way we train, whether we do it the way it's done in Japan or come up with various add-ons, we have to face up to the reality that for some people, it may one day no longer be a game, a cool way to spend a weekday evening. And if we are instructors we have to be willing to bear the load of that responsibilty. Is the way we train the BEST we know how to prepare a student?

(For those who advocate sparring to recreate the feel of combat, personally I don't think a sexual assault feel is an easy thing to replicate in sparring. But that's just my opinion). :)

3) And for those of us who are true-blue Budo Taijutsu believers, who believe that it's the best martial art around on this planet, period, then another issue comes up. If any of your students ever had to use taijutsu to save their a55 (either metaphorically or literally) and failed, how would YOU respond? What would that do to you? Would you be overcome by guilt and blame yourself? Or would you go the other extreme and blame the student entirely?

And there are yet more questions brewing in my subconscious over your post. Still meditating on them...

Quote:

To say that I set a poor example of Bujinkan leadership and exercised appallingly bad judgment is, in my own opinion, an understatement. It is probably the most stupid and irresponsible thing I've ever done, and I'm sorry for it.


You triggered off within me loads of soul-searching with your original post. You made me think through how I would take up the responsibilities of teaching budo (I'm currently nidan, so it's still a long way off), you made me ask myself a lot of "Are you REALLY sure?" questions, which then led to me facing my solo training and classtime with even more seriousness than before.

If this is what you do that is stupid and irresponsible, then hey, let's have more of it. :)

My 2.1 cents (Singapore GST inclusive) worth...

Junjie

Posted on: 2007/6/1 17:05
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Other Types of Ukemi
Villager
Joined:
2007/4/9 15:25
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 97
Offline
Forgot to include this earlier. It's a quote from a post from the kukishinden ryu thread by a person whose name isn't there anymore. Sad, because what he posted reflects my feelings on holding a position not worth holding and I'd like to give him credit, if I could just find out who it is.

"I am also reminded that it is bad to prove someone “wrong”. In old Japan to prove someone wrong could often push them into a position of having to commit seppuku so is something to be strictly avoided even if they are wrong.

I am reminded of an incident in which my wife took a watch to a repairer in Japan. She said it was a “Seiko” and he disagreed and went into a long explanation of why it wasn’t as she just replied with lots of Japanese female “Isn’t that fascinating” replies. As we walked out I said – “why didn’t you just tell him you worked for "Seiko” to which I was told that it would be extremely rude to prove him wrong – even though he obviously was."

Not directly relevant, but related, IMHO. This poster was talking about NOT proving someone wrong, and I'm thinking along the lines of not forcing people to accept that I am right (especially when I am not).

Anyway, this is my 2.01 cents (Singapore GST inclusive) on the matter...

Junjie
Singapore

Posted on: 2007/5/24 16:32
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Other Types of Ukemi
Villager
Joined:
2007/4/9 15:25
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 97
Offline
At my CURRENT level of training, it seems to me that ukemi is easier done when not commited to a particular outcome (for example, I WILL punch you no matter what, or I WILL omote gyaku the living daylights out of you, whatever happens).

And this carries over to my regular life too. If I am locked in to a particular position on a matter, the more other people show me to be wrong the harder it is for me to ukemi my dignity and self-respect back, because I will have acted stupidly to guard a position I shouldn't have been guarding that hard in the first place.

I have seen otherwise intelligent people do really stupid things when they feel threatened, when they feel a person who disagrees with them is attacking them in some way or fashion. I've been guilty of it myself, and realized that even if I somehow "won" the argument (people just gave up trying to make me see sense) I feel empty inside. There's no real victory there. Anyone know what I am talking about? :)

On a side note, I've faced a couple of challenges re: my budo skills by people who wanted to hand me my rear end on a platter with their undoubtedly superior grappling/wrestling skills. A suggestion that we meet some place like a tennis court (no mats) on a nice sunny Singapore afternoon at 4 pm (wearing a gi = heat stroke)to "discuss" the matter usually leads to them suddenly remembering prior committments.

As I said, I am sure they are better skilled than me in those areas and they intend to move the battle to their own home turf. But if they are that committed to kicking my rear end, I am sure that if they DO turn up they'll give me something I can use.

And if they are NOT, it's fine too. Then I get on with life as per normal. Contrary to what my shidoshi thinks, I am not looking for fights everyway I go (I'm just sadly misunderstood... )

My current thoughts on the matter, which will probably change as I grow up.

Junjie
Singapore

Posted on: 2007/5/24 16:17
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Kanji in Certificates
Villager
Joined:
2007/4/9 15:25
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 97
Offline
It can mean that you are perpetually lucky. Or dan-grades get preferential treatment? Well, I'm cool with that!

I realized quite some time back that studying jap with budo in mind just makes you look at the language really differently. You end up knowing kanji that most people don't know, and find looking up references in a dictionary frustrating at times.

Once told a jap teacher that she lived in modern Japan, while I live in the Sengoku period... (Japanese history's warring states period).

Junjie

Posted on: 2007/4/11 19:03
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Kanji in Certificates
Villager
Joined:
2007/4/9 15:25
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 97
Offline
Thank you, Ari and Jussi!

The sites you gave me are a great help. I'm at those sites now and taking notes. *scribble*

Junjie

Posted on: 2007/4/10 19:09
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Kanji in Certificates
Villager
Joined:
2007/4/9 15:25
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 97
Offline
Hello, everyone!

I'm Junjie, a nidan from Singapore. I just recently got my nidan cert and discovered firsthand the different kanji used for some numbers in official documents.

Where can I get to see such kanji in detail so I can study them? I'm learning Japanese by myself (spirit is willing but the budget is weak) and the kanji for certs is something interesting for me to look into...

Thanks for the help, everyone!

Junjie

Posted on: 2007/4/10 13:16
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer



 Top
« 1 ... 7 8 9 (10)




Today's Sponsor