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Re: American Liabilty Insurance????
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In Sweden the Swedish Budo Federation has an insurance for member clubs. Maybe they can answer questions?

Nearly all bujinkan clubs are part of the Bujinkan wing "Bujinkan Sweden".

BR

Posted on: 2014/9/18 22:18
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Re: TAJ JIUTSU PUNCHES.
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Dear Kframe

Good to hear your honest interest in understanding more of the Bujinkan way of doing things.

The long strike we see in Bujinkan 99% of the time is, as you point out, not a realistic way of punching an opponent in a real fight. At least not one that is in balance and see what is coming.

However, it is a good practice of generating power with your body and maintaining structure while moving in a low position. If we can strike well in a low position, it is easy to do it with balance and structure in a higher position when needed. If, on the other hand, we train the other way around and start with "realistic" striking and self defence it is unlikely that we will ever develop good taijutsu.

Personally I see this strike, as well as all the formal waza, as exercises of body movement. Although, the waza also contain a principle or idea for dealing with a confrontation. They are in some sense exaggregated for pedagogical and exercise reasons.

Once you have developed good taijutsu skills you can of course apply them freely in your striking. Once you can generate power with your body with maintained balance and structure, superior distance and angeling, you are free to strike from whatever footwork that is appropriate. (In fact, you will proably not think about striking your opponent as much as about manipulating him.) Its a matter of learning how to crawl before how to walk, so to say.

This is my personal opinion of course. You should also keep in mind that traditional budo does not have short cuts, you are supposed to train hard for 10-15 years to be good at the basics. Also, these techniques were created before there was sports martial arts so they target somewhat different needs and circumstances.

Good luck with your training. If you keep going I am sure you will find many layers of development that you are yet unaware of. Like all of us.

Kind regards

Kent


Posted on: 2014/2/2 5:45
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Re: Shidoshikai Forum: Card Upload Module Finally Working Again
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I managed to upload, but never found the actual Shidoshikai forum. Where is it?

Posted on: 2013/4/26 19:09
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Re: Combat martial art?
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Dear Marcus

Perhaps you read thins into my answer that I did not mean, but ok.

Let me pose a counter question; do you propose we should stop training our positioning, balance handeling etc and that it would make us better prepared at fighting?

I always consider my training to be of traditional combat art. However, the combat aspect may be empahzised to a higher or lower degree at different times due to the short term training goal at hand.

Best regards

Posted on: 2013/3/22 0:00
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Re: Shidoshikai Forum: Card Upload Module Finally Working Again
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I dont see it under main menue? How do I do it?

Posted on: 2013/3/19 22:18
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Re: Bujinkan Training Theme 2013
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Nice slipper!

Posted on: 2013/3/19 22:13
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Re: Combat martial art?
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Than you for your post. I will share some immediate thoughts.

There is a lot to train in the Bujinkan and a lot of techniques are outdated in terms of direct modern application, eg armor specific stuff etc. However, training in the Bujinkan gives you a chance to go deeply into the study of traditional fighting that in my opinion is unique considering the depth combined with the range of schools and weapons.

On the other hand, training these things can have an indirect effect on your ability to defend yourself as it gives you understanding of distance, timing, angles etc. The same goes for a lot of the training we do in balance manipulation etc. It builds skills that are useful in a real fight even though some of the dojo training we do are exercises in developing those skills, rather than directly applicable self-defense techniques.

Then, of course, it is possible to always train for the purpose of fighting and defending. However, the best way to do that is to limit your training to the simple stuff. Kicking the groin etc. That is fine, but for me I would probably be bored very soon if I only got that kind of training. I would probably be fed up after a few years ant move on to something else.

Personally I shift in focus depending on what I want to pursue at the moment. Right now I try to improve how I use my hip to get faster and cleaner taijutsu. At other times I train more self-defense, or go into exotic weapons etc depending on the interest I have at the moment. I tend to keep bringing up self defense in my class but most of the training are around themes that I set up for each semester.

Whether or not I as an instructor is "obliged" to teach combat I think depends on what I communicated to my students. If I marketed my dojo as a combat training, I should provide that. If the dojo is marketed as a cultural historic study of traditional martial art, there is no need to put a lot of time into self defense or randori or such. The important thing is to be clear about what you teach and deliver on the expectations you create.

On the topic of fighting, I noticed that the Bujinkan methods appear effective as long as the attacker is attacking with an offensive intent, to injure or kill. But with sports martial arts attackers, they tend to attack defensively, they are keeping a defense while attacking. This makes it difficult to receive the attack in a way that allows for manipulating the attacker in the way we tend to train in Bujinkan. I know some dojos have worked much more with this so it would be interesting to hear opinions and suggestions about it.

Cheers

Posted on: 2013/3/19 21:15
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Ever wondered what those scribblings mean? Chinese character translation tool
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Posted on: 2012/10/17 21:06
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Re: Is Bujinkan’s credibility eroding?
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Talking about youtube I hade another interesting experience recently. We had a meeting in the Dojo and happened to start talking with some junior students about where they heard about Bujinkan in the first place. Actually, all of the students still left from those starting in recent semesters, none had their interest triggered by our posters. All of them had seen Bujinkan videos on youtube and decided to look for a dojo in their area!

I think of the general marketing tendency of people being satisfied when delivery meets or exeeds expectations. Was that many of the people who quit during the semester attracted by ads or posters, but the ones who saw BT on youtube had more correct (or lower ;) ) expectations and did not get disappointed when coming to training?

Did any of you guys have similar experiences? Would be interesting to know for promoting the dojo and attracting people with better precision.

Posted on: 2009/12/9 19:37
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Re: returning too training after a very long absence.
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Motoric skills are developed in primarily in the brains motor cortex, you dont store much "technique" in your body as such. E.g.thinking techniques is very similar to the brain as actually doing them, it is another part in the brain that jacks-in the body so to speak. There are limitations though, without actual movement you dont get feedback through the neuron pathways from your body which is also of importance. Thats one reason mental training can be effective, but not as effective as physical.

What I am trying to say is, dont worry so much about the body. Just get going and things come back quite quickly. Actually you may benefit from loosing some bad habits on the way!?

Personally I feel that Kamae is one area that suffers from absence from training and where it pays a lot to put effort.

Good luck and remember to enjoy!

Posted on: 2009/11/17 1:07
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