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Re: The Grass is always Greener - part 2 (the sequel)
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Just a short question for Ralph.

You wrote earlier that the Inosanto/LaCoste system is the one you feel is the most complete. How is it then that LaCoste veteran of 18 years Roy Harris (yes, the BJJ guy, for those in the know) was so easily defeated in a sparring match by Romy Macapagal of Kalis Ilustrisimo? Did that have to do with the individuals involved, or the styles?

Scroll down here for more information:

http://www.realfighting.com/issue7/romyframe.html


Tobias Goldstein

Posted on: 2006/2/16 3:02
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Re: Sparring equals stress testing
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Once you set parameters for the altercation you're trying to replicate, in this case squaring off, your results are “proof” only in engagements that have those parameters. Since the real world is unpredictable, I see sparring mainly as a tool for developing attributes of speed, timing and other important things. That is ALL it is good for and it proves nothing unless the engagement on the street closely resembles it and in many cases experience has shown that the real world does NOT resemble that. What you're suggesting is, IMHO, a breeding ground for the mindset of symmetrical fighting, as opposed to assymetrical combat (the latter is what I've been taught being the preferable alternative, i.e. stacking the odds in your favour rather than slugging it out with someone to see whom is the toughest).


Tobias Goldstein

Posted on: 2005/9/29 6:23
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Re: Here we go again ....
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I apologize, I could have mistaken his first K1 fight with his first match elsewhere, but I do recall having heard something along those lines. (However, I know people who have trained boxing for years whom have still gotten through without having been forced to spar. Even so, hard focus pad drillings and shadowboxing etc. can't really be called slow movement, can they?)

Does anyone know if the "Brazilian Behemoth" Montanha Silva had any previous fighting records before being matched against Musashi, BTW?


Tobias Goldstein

Posted on: 2005/9/23 7:07
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Re: Here we go again ....
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From what I've heard that wasn't the case. I'm going to check my sources and get back.

Posted on: 2005/9/22 12:39
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Re: Here we go again ....
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CroCop won his first K1 match easily, and to the best of my knowledge, he'd never sparred full contact even once before that. Just something to consider.

Tobias Goldstein

Posted on: 2005/9/22 4:16
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Re: Training with Non-Bujinkan Practitioners
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Where I currently train there's recently been a couple of drills done that might be described as "isolation sparring". One of these was built on the following premises - one guy uses whatever punches he feels like (only punches, no kicking in this particular exercise), and retracts his punching arm after every attack. Meanwhile, his partner tries to move in, establish some kind of momentary control, and then apply torite kihon or a couple of variations thereof. To be perfectly honest, I'd say I actually fared quite well last time. The things that made my movements successful were, IMHO, these three things:

a) bend your knees and move the feet a lot, try to keep your weight on your rear foot as much as possible so you can apply an offensive triangle with your ichimonji upon physical contact.

b) a hand moves too fast in order for you to catch it and apply a lock, so establish control of his elbow instead (this also means that it is often safer to seek your opponent's flank rather than to meet him head-on - look at how a bullfighter handles the situation ).

c) the "flinch response" where your elbow comes up like a spear and your hand covers your ear, it's extremely effective, covers you well and is easy to pull off even against a totally spontaneous attack.

Just my two cents.

Tobias Goldstein

Posted on: 2005/9/19 9:17
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Re: I realy dint expect this...
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Luckily, the amount of times I've had to defend myself, as opposed to having been an active, willing participant of a fight (which is illegal by the way - the same is not true for defending yourself), has been relatively few times.

Tobias Goldstein

Posted on: 2005/8/13 13:34
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Re: Pretending to be something you aren't...
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While I do think Daniel has some valid points, it is my firm belief that the "village idiot" should not be underestimated. Mark Twain once stated that the world's best fencer does not need to worry about the world's second best fencer, because the largest threat to him is the incompetent fool who does not even know how to hold a sword properly, and who does not follow any easily anticipated, trained movement patterns. Or as Murphy would have it, "professionals are predictable, but the world is full of amateurs".

Tobias

Posted on: 2005/8/8 22:37
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RE: Close Combat
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What I'm saying is that you cannot engage in a long, drawn out "contest" with someone in which the winner will be the one with most strength and endurance. That is a very good way to a) get beaten by someone more powerful and b)be an active, willing participant of a fight, which means you were half the reason the situation escalated.

As for quick flurries of punches, well... he needs a certain distance to pull them off. You can be inside that distance, or outside.

Tobias

Posted on: 2005/8/3 7:34
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RE: Close Combat
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Kickboxing is based on a give-and-take premise. This is not what you want at all.

Tobias

Posted on: 2005/8/3 7:08
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