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Re: New student requesting some information.
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kweaver wrote:
Most martial arts techniques (regardless of the system) are not meant to be applied against resistance. Like anything else in life, if you have have to force it, it is probably wrong. Combative sports (MMA) often work on the "over come" basis. Martial arts use openings, weak points in armor, defense, or balance to apply just enough energy in precicely the right way to achieve their goal. Otherwise, it makes as much sense as repeatedly running into a wall hard enough and long enough to make a door, when there is an open window right there.

The aspect of training you seem to be asking about, the application under stress, has less to do about making the tachniques work against direct resistance (forcing a joint lock when they are fighting it) and more to do about learning to find the weak points and exploit them under stress. The best way to do this is repeatly and slowly to teach your body to feel them. These arts have been around a long time. They way they are taught is tried and true. Trust in this and be patient.


I think you're mentioning the top level resulting from dedicated training over a ridiculously long period of time. This notion is fairly modern. Most practitioners of arts like this, using them during the period in time when they were most used, didn't have the luxury of training for a one in a million chance they had to use it. Instead, the had to trek out into the battlefield with whatever small amount of training they had. The strongest survived and, if lucky, got to refine technique long after their fighting days were done.

You're right, though. These arts have been around for a long time, but if you think they are being taught now like they were then you may be fooling yourself. The top level of Kukishin for example, has you perform certain techniques against random attacks forcing you to find a way to get that technique applied. I don't recall seeing that type of training recently

Posted on: 2014/1/13 10:52
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Re: Can someone tell me what Hatsumi book this is - probably pretty rare.
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I think you are referring to Kimi no mo ninja nareru (you too can be a ninja). It's about 30 years old now, I think, and if you are able to locate a copy it will likely be on amazon marketplace for a considerable sum.

Posted on: 2014/1/12 12:32
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Re: New student requesting some information.
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Kframe wrote:
Thanks for the clarification guys. Any tips on the the last kata of sanshin? After I step off line, I have to throw up my other hand in distraction and do a front kick. I having issues with my balance coming from so far to the right and back to center to kick.

Oddly despite all the practice I have with the kick on my own, I still have to really concentrate on just doing it right. It seams so counter intuitive to the MT teep or Karate front snap kick.. Keeping the leg straight till I get to the desired hiegth then chamber and kick, with out bending my back is very difficult. So far I can only kick knee hiegth correctly. Yet with the other styles I can do it to face level.

I wonder what the advantage of this kick is?


This seems contrary to how I learned it. Your knee should come up to your chest while your leg is bent so it is already chambered.

If you feel you have too far to go to kick when you move offline chances are you're leaving your front foot behind when you move. It should be coming with you enough that you require only a slight shift to free the kicking leg.

Posted on: 2014/1/5 0:04
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Re: New student requesting some information.
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I have experienced oni kudaki as an elbow dislocation. Many people are strong enough in the arms that a 90 degree bend on the elbow isn't enough. Once you start to open up the angle the opponent loses the leverage needed to resist and his elbow goes 'pop'.

Posted on: 2014/1/5 0:01
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Re: New student requesting some information.
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mrdunsky wrote:

But don't take my word for it, look at all of the "Documentary" evidence for the variation in styles of movement in the Shihan. Look at Oguri Sensei's movment and compare it to Nagato, Noguchi, and see the definite differences but also what they do in common.


I feel they move differently because they are different generations of students of the art. The more I watch the original shihan move the more similarities I see. I don't feel the same about others, however.

Posted on: 2013/12/18 16:29
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Re: New student requesting some information.
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Kframe wrote:
Mr dunsky, I know my opinion is of little value, but being a laughing stock is not something any martial artist wants. I want to be taken seriously as a martial artist. Its hard to be taken seriously if your part of the very small group of practitioners that are not larping, but training hard.



Just a question for you, Joshua. Are you already concerned or dissatisfied enough with your training that you need to post your questions/concerns on at least 3 different martial arts forums?

What can people here provide you that you can't get from your teacher and his relationship with his teacher?

Posted on: 2013/12/18 16:28
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Re: New documentary featuring Dr. Kacem Zoughari
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Lockfield wrote:
1. It's easy to say that he is questioning the validity of the technique due to effectiveness, it's different when you are doing something to really validate it's effectiveness.

2. If Ninjutsu and/or Koryu is supposed to be effective at any setting, including MMA (his words), well the proof is in the pudding: where's the pudding?

3. His account of ninjutsu is majorly focused on assassination. Historical documentation of ninja assassination please. I don't know (and if it did, I didn't catch it) any point in the video that he references ninjutsu as intelligence gathering, which has documentation from various sources.

4. He talks too much in the class setting. His uke's tsuki sucks, instead of addressing that technical deficiency, he focuses on the higher stuff of strategy, tactics and philosophy.


MY final verdict: actions speak louder than words, and his actions don't speak much.


I don't see how the physical elements of the video (and people other than the main person in the documentary) have anything to do with what the person in the documentary is saying. If this were an instructional video you might be on to something but as it isn't what you write makes little sense.

And the irony of someone on a bujinkan message board writing things like 'the proof is in the pudding' causes my sides to hurt from laughing.

Posted on: 2013/12/10 13:10
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Re: Question on koku
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I agree with the above poster. It's important to learn from someone who knows how to do it properly. Koku is the first and in many ways most important kata from Gyokko Ryu. How you do it will influence how you do the other waza from the school so it's best to be sure you've been shown correctly and then practice it that way.

Also, it's probably best not to do it exactly as shown in the video posted here.

Posted on: 2013/10/14 15:59
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Re: Interesting questions (I think)
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koryu wrote:
I agree with most of your comments.
And yes, I have the best teachers, Hatsumi Sôke and the japanese shihans ;>)


If you have the best teachers, why do you feel you are getting a watered down version of something. Also, if your teacher is Soke, why not ask him these questions you have?

Posted on: 2013/3/14 13:07
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Re: Takamatsu's successor
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Shimajiro wrote:
Ed never said we shouldn't trust experts.

He said we shouldn't trust "experts" who aren't really experts.


Yes, that is what I was saying as well. I was merely pointing out that the large majority of us don't have the experience or knowledge to be able to determine for sure whether Hatsumi sensei is an expert or not.

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There is a very big difference, to me at least, between Hatsumi Soke's immense legacy of training, teaching, writings, demonstrations and interviews from the 1960's to the present, and the frowning concern on the faces of various "experts" worried that Hatsumi Soke's legacy might somehow be not legit.


I imagine you know as little about the experts' qualifications as you know about Hatsumi sensei's documentation. While the people who make the most fuss are usually the most ignorant (I'm referring to basically Non-japanese-speaking people who make youtube videos and the like) there are other more knowledgeable people who may question Hastumi sensei's claims.

Quote:

If I honestly believe someone is truly an expert in their field, I listen and listen carefully. I don't think Ed is saying anything different in his post. Hatsumi Soke is clearly (to most of us) the expert, and is the one Ed (and I and many others) listen to for all things ninjutsu.


That is the key word. You believe someone is what they say. That's what I was saying as well. I also believe Hatsumi sensei's claims to legitimacy but that's because I choose to accept what he says. I have no way to prove if he is or isn't so I act on 'faith'.

My issue with what Mr. Martin wrote is that it came across as stating "Don't listen to the words of experts but listen to that expert." It seemed a paradox.






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Posted on: 2013/2/2 20:30
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