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   All Posts (YuTaiSheng)


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Re: Call out for a renku
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Posted on: 2006/8/31 9:53
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Re: Call out for a renku
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A renku is a form of linked verse, the poetic form between waka and haiku. Renku is its truest form is actually made by linking 7 character Chinese couplets together(lienju in Chinese) but the Japanese developed an alternate form that involves alternating between units with 5-7-5 and units of 7-7, with the 7-7 being alternately written in Japanese and Chinese called wakan renku. Following that model, Phlux and I created an eikan renku, with Phlux writing haiku in English and me composing Chinese couplets. So that's an abridged explanation of what a renku is and what I'd like to do again.

Posted on: 2006/8/31 9:30
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Call out for a renku
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Hey all,

It's been a long time since we did a renku, and having talked with a Columbia grad student who brought up the need for scholars to try producing the poetry they research, I've gotten in the mood to do another renku. I definitely want an odd number of participants (either 3 or 5) so that there's alternation between composing leading lines and capping lines. So who's up for this?

Posted on: 2006/8/30 16:27
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Re: Cross training
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Quote:

antizen wrote:
I believe it was Harada sensei that pointed out to a group of us Shidoshi that the Bujinkan has nine schools, any one of which is easily a lifetime of study. Considering that in the "old days" in Japan, a warrior's total training came from a single one of our nine schools, it seems ridiculous to me that Bujinkan teachers feel that it's a good use of time to borrow yet from OTHER arts in order to teach Bujinkan.


I understand and completely commend your loyalty and devotion to Bujinkan, but your statements raise a few questions: How many shidoshi know all the techniques in all nine schools? How many shidoshi know more than one school? Is it a plausible expectation to learn all the techniques, even though you may just use a set number of them in an event ouside of the dojo?

Posted on: 2006/5/15 4:21
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Re: what is yhe difference between Tai Chi and Ninjutsu
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Quote:

Strider wrote:
defining taijutsu as an "external" martial art is silly.


After having watch Dave Chapelle on Inside the Actor's Studio, I gotta say that's totally dismissive. It shows you don't understand that "external/internal" distinction. The distinction is particalur to Chinese martial arts. So while it is problematic to talk Japanese martial arts in terms of a typology of Chinese martial arts, don't be so casual in saying it's "silly."

Quote:

Hatsumi sensei has been saying as far back as the 1993 Daikomyosai that you don't need to study things like chi kung....if you train taijutsu correctly.


It's interesting to hear a statement like this. I'm working on my dissertation and one of the issues involved is othropraxis, or the correct practice (in my dissertaion this centers on waka poetry). My rejoinder to that statement is that this is something that is, in the words of the late Jacques Derrida, is deferred. This means while the possibility of correctly training exist, the actual achievement of correct training is like a carrot-on-a string in front of a horse. It hangs ever so slightly out of reach. What makes things even more interesting is that a concept that appears in taijiutsu and in Derrida's philosophy is play. Play is the concept in Derrida's philosophy that destablizes everything, including the philosophy itself. When I read Derrida, I'm never sure when to take him seriously because everything could be at play for him. A joke could be a serious statement and vice versa in his philosophy. You never know where you stand. I think there is some truth of that in taijutsu. The only differencce is that it is sought after. Taijutsu operates in that unstable space and uses it to its advantage. But the space is unstable and that means there are no guarantees, not even of correct training. Something to think about.

Posted on: 2006/5/8 4:54
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Re: what is the difference between Tai Chi and Ninjutsu
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Quote:

Shinoobie wrote:
One definition of a genius is a person who can communicate complicated things in a way that makes them seem simple. If you must speak in a complex way then you do not truly understand something well enough to teach it. A wise man who speaks in riddles is only wise to himself. Please be mindful of this when applying square aphorisms to round holes.

K.I.S.S.



So by your logic Zhuangzi or Gong Sunlong are wise to themselves? Don't confuse not getting the allusion with not understanding. Besides, you can look up some of the terms I used up online or in a dictionary if you really don't understand them. My point was that the fundamental ontology of this question is that of a cut. It's more about splitting things in two or placing things in categories rather than having a dialogue. Hence my citation of Zhuangzi's passage from the "Discourse on the Equality of Things." If you're serious about addressing this question logically, you should be mindful that every answer you give potentially ostracizes some one or something in some manner. Is that clear enough for you?

Posted on: 2006/4/28 10:11
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Re: what is the difference between Tai Chi and Ninjutsu
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I'll paraphrase Zhuangzi and answer it this way: Saying there is a difference and there being a difference are two things. Saying they are two things and the fact that they are two things means there are three things.
Be mindful of the fundamental ontology behind this question before you give an answer.

Posted on: 2006/4/28 8:05
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Re: what is the difference between Tai Chi and Ninjutsu
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I think it was in very poor taste for folks like Lockfield and mrdunsky to make such crass comments about Taiji. In light of that I could answer the question by saying Taiji practicitioners have some ethical respect while taijutsu students don't. But I've met some taiji people who have more ego than they do skill. The point is not judge any one style. I've respected all the taijutsu people on this board; any question I've asked about the art has been a sincere attempt to understand the art and the people who practice it. But I can see the same is not always true of my art of taiji among some taijutsu practicioners. I can't help it if you think so poorly of the art of taiji; just have some common courtesy to keep your comments and opinions to yourself.

Posted on: 2006/4/26 14:10
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Re: Bunbu Ryodo: balance of literary and martial arts
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Quote:

MannySan wrote:
Mr. Sheng, I just want to be sure I understand your viewpoint. Like you said, many martial artists try to apply martial skills to their lives, and sometimes start practicing "traditional" artforms as a training outlet. Are you saying that people should be more creative in applying their skills to daily life, rather than looking at ancient traditions?


No, I'm the last one to dismiss ancient traditions. I'm often reading and citing Confucius, Mencius, Zhuangzi, etc. In fact I'm also learning gagaku, Japanese court music, perhaps one of the oldest continuing traditions. I just feel that the larger goal is to, in the words of Confucian philosophy, cultivate the self. Sure things you learn in one area of life can easily apply to and inform other aspects, but I find it hard to make one aspect of your life the center around which others should revolve. Have I practiced wushu in places other than my wushu class, of course. But I never actively tried to turn my college classroom or other places in a practice area. It was more out of boredom and my mind wandering that led me to work on my sword form or practice my Chen Taiji in some place outside of wushu class. So I'm questioning the rationale behind actively trying to turn your workplace or classroom into a second dojo. What is being foregrounded, what is being backgrounded and why?

Posted on: 2005/12/16 16:37
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Bunbu Ryodo: A Different Angle
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Let me take this in a different direction. I don't practice taijustu; I do wushu and taiji and heard a variation of this phrase in my early days of practice: "The scholar should be as adept with brush as with sword." This puts a different interpretation out there than what's been mention thus far.

Up until now the underlying assumption has been that the martial skills can be translated into other aspects of life, hence the search for ways to practice outside of the dojo and the querries into whether "traditional" artforms can be beneficial. But the version I heard puts another read out there; that it is the person, not the skill sets, that need to be able to change and adapt. I see it in a more Confucian framework; the individual needs to be comfortable with the various roles (s)he has in society. This idea is said a bit more eloquently in the Matrix when the young boy tells Neo, "Realize the truth: there is no spoon. Then, you'll see that it's not the spoon that bends, but only yourself." Here's hoping that your spoons (or any other eating utensils) bend upon reading this.

Posted on: 2005/12/16 10:33
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