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Re: The reality of seme: An article on Kenshi
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Very interesting read. Thank you.

Posted on: 2010/11/6 17:03
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Re: Kacem's Interview
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I generally agree with what you have to say, but in this case I must take issue with the point about Lesnar though. Dr Zoughari pointed out the issue of the average BBT guy against the average MMA guy, not against one of the top in the field. You and I both do judo; wouldn't the same apply with judo?

Posted on: 2010/11/6 17:01
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Re: Kacem's Interview
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Quote:

benkyoka wrote:
Quote:

Papa-san wrote:

Ninjutsu does adapt to the person and their is something there for everyone.


Maybe it's just me but I don't feel that 'Ninjutsu' adapts to everyone. I think most people (almost everyone) get away with not 'adapting' to Ninjutsu.


Well said, Mr Sked. It seems that many people are content to skip the 'shu' stage of shu-ha-ri, despite the fact that that order exists for a reason.

Posted on: 2010/11/5 1:26
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Re: Kacem's Interview
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Carson, perhaps we should give Dr Zoughari the benefit of the doubt regarding the word 'real'. I can see how that would have a different connotation in French, which is his native language.

Posted on: 2010/11/4 23:45
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Re: Kacem's Interview
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I find it very inspiring to read how he was from a poor family, went to Japan at 17 to train, was taken in by a shihan and went on to become a scholar of Japanese history.

Posted on: 2010/11/4 19:12
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Re: Kacem's Interview
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Quote:
You talked before about the lack of fighting experience even from very highly ranked Ninjutsu teachers, who can’t stand in front of an MMA athlete. MMA people claim that it’s the lack of sparring responsible for that in your art. What do you think about that?

Dr.K.Z.
: I disagree. I don’t mean that sparring doesn’t have its value. It teaches you a lot of things like distance, rhythm and timing and it also helps you check the validity of many techniques as well as your ability to do them. However, sparring is governed by rules where as real combat isn’t. Therefore sparring isn’t the panacea that will magically solve all problems. I believe that the problem in Ninjutsu (apart from the false grades of course) is that attacks are never made in reality, with full force and intent. Therefore the defenses are also loose and trainees never learn to work with correct speed and power. Also, practitioners don’t feel the need to learn the details of every move as well as correct body alignment, necessary ingredients for a technique becoming efficient, since all is done in cooperation and no one is in danger. Now you will say, if techniques were done that way, then we would have injured or even dead on the tatami. Correct. That is exactly the reason why real martial arts are finally aimed only for an elite group of dedicated people and not for everyone. From the moment of opening the doors to everyone, then a martial art has to be “diluted” and in that way loses its battle characteristics. Nevertheless, we can find the via media so that training can be realistic and at the same time have the least possible injuries. And that is the bet for someone who wants to work correctly.

Concluding our very interesting interview, I would like you to tell me what you consider most important in a person practicing martial arts.

Dr.K.Z.
: Honesty concerning one’s intentions, seriousness and continuity concerning one’s training, and no “blindness”. If you discover along the way that something isn’t right either with your master, with your art or with you, don’t hesitate to admit it and to change it at once, even if the price for that would be to start over from the beginning.


I thought this was particularly noteworthy.

Posted on: 2010/11/4 9:16
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Re: Shodan No Maki, by Van Donk?
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YoruKage, is this place in Boise Valley accessible?
http://www.bvjudo.com/ The instructor is a judo rokudan.

There's also this aikido place that seems well-regarded on aikiweb http://www.komyozan.org/site/index.ph ... on=com_frontpage&Itemid=1

Judo would be my top suggestion if you can get to it though because it will give you good conditioning and understanding of kuzushi before you get a chance to start taijutsu training, and if you'll be traveling once a month, it will be a good way to reinforce what you're learning in between.

Posted on: 2010/11/3 11:29
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Re: Shodan No Maki, by Van Donk?
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Even if you can't find a Bujinkan instructor, return the set and use that money on some good judo or aikido.

Posted on: 2010/11/2 13:24
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Re: An article with solid advice across arts
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Quote:

wawup wrote:
I'm not sure if this applies to me, as my knowledge is fairly slim. But if I was in a class and a teacher showed something foolishly or dangerous for myself (without having been a prior set or series of lessons), I might be interested in having a guest come over to share their experience with the technique, or a similar out-of-the-dojo technique, it could be beneficial to my training.

I don't know if the above is logical at all. If I was shown something dangerous and I was none-the-wiser... I think I'd welcome a guest sharing knowledge with me.

However... I'm not sure if that really falls under unsolicited.


A lot of people have been bringing up straw man examples like this involving an incompetent main instructor teaching something and a competent guest instructor correcting.

However, given that the discussion here seems to be about Hatsumi-sensei's class, that does not apply as clearly Soke is not incompetent and instructors (by which I don't mean the shihan, I mean Westerners) trying to "explain" his teachings are more likely than not to distort them.

This is paraphrasing what I read in the thread. I don't have any personal experience with this so I have no opinion on the matter.

Posted on: 2010/10/27 13:06
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Re: Columbia Tai Kai Godan Test
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Quote:

mcronin wrote:
Quote:

kouryuu wrote:

He states his opinion, stays on topic, and leaves it at that.

Shawn


I beg to differ:

Quote:

RJHIII wrote:

This seriously sounds like a complete work of fiction, let me know when the movie deal comes out.




To be fair it does sound Sho Kosugi-ish.

Posted on: 2010/10/20 2:24
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