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   All Posts (Brian)


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Re: blogging?
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Posted on: 2009/6/21 4:55
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Re: blogging?
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Hey Darryl,

Stop by and check out my blog some time:
The Instinctive Edge
http://brianvancise.wordpress.com/

Brian R. VanCise

Posted on: 2009/6/21 4:48
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Re: New book by Soke - Unarmed fighting techniques of the Samurai
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Just received the word through amazon today that the shipping of the preordered books is delayed. They are having trouble getting the copies here on time.

Posted on: 2008/7/3 0:26
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Re: New book by Soke - Unarmed fighting techniques of the Samurai
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I am looking forward to getting the book here in the States eventually. Even though I preordered the wait is killing me. Still, it is very interesting to hear everything from the people who have either read it or translated it. Keep going!

Posted on: 2008/6/28 5:31
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Re: Tank takes aim .... Whose Thread is this Anyway?
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Fact: This thread is an interesting read.

Fact: We may not like it all the time but Daniel and Lance do bring up points to consider.

Fact: Everyone here needs to train more!

Posted on: 2008/6/7 23:03
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Re: Tank takes aim .... Whose Bujinkan is this Anyway?
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Wow this is a great discussion.

Personally having been and training still in other martial systems I enjoy the freedom within the Bujinkan. That being said this freedom does come with a price and that is some individuals with poor technique, training, etc. Unfortunately when said individuals continue on and become Shidoshi or Shihan then they pass on their poor technique, training and mediocrity in general.

Take a look at two arts that I am intimately familiar with. The first Brazilian Jiujitsu. Okay when you roll with a blue belt you pretty much know within a certain range what you are getting. In general you are getting someone prettty darn skilled and also tough. (though it has changed a bit in the last few years due to popularity of the art ie: starting to water down a bit) As you go up the ranks in BJJ you will find that it is still not watered down and a purple belt is bloody tough and a Brown Belt even tougher and a Blackbelt well they are really, really good technicians and can back up everything they do. (ie. do it in real time) This ability to do what they do in real time against a fully resisting opponent makes them very formidable and effective. Most BJJ bluebelts would own Budo Taijutsu 10th Dan's in a friendly sparring match. (yikes) On the street with tools involved well the odds should change a bit.

Okay now let's look at the Filipino Martial Arts. In general the FMA's are a little looser organizationally and yet the creme does rise to the top. In the FMA's someone depending on their system may just be a practitioner or an instructor and that is it. Or if they are a part of a system that has belt ranking then their training may be more organized and have standard testing etc. Now, all the FMA's that I have worked in and around have alive sparring. Meaning they like to get at it and they like the contact. (alot) This contact and the ability to dish out a hit and absorb a hit makes them mentally tough. Not alot of people like taking full power hits to the head with a stick. Particularly if you are only wearing fencing masks. So in my experience many filipino training halls are pretty small. Now here is a point of note: there are few FMA instructors that are not tough. Sure there is an exception here and there but by and large challenge one in sparring and they will not back down and will make you pay. The manner in which FMA's train and the alive sparring would definately give your average FMA practitioner an advantage over a Budo Taijutsu 10th Dan and above with or without weapons. (yikes again)

Now this brings us back to Budo Taijutsu. As I said above I enjoy the creativity and freedom of movement. However, a beginner or someone who has been training for just a while (five to ten years of course this is an arbitrary number and would have to change depending on the individual) should probably be working those basics religioiusly and not creating as much. Solid basics training will allow someone to succeed at the higher end material. However, if those basics are skipped then forget it you will have mediocrity. Too many people in the Bujinkan have skipped the basics, went to the more advanced material and are mediocre at best!

Now here is the positive! A Budo Taijutsu practitioner that does not skip the basics and religiously trains them and sticks around long enough to be able to move with freedom and create using said strong basics can be just absolutely scary! I have met a few. (just a few out of thousands) However, those few individuals are dynamite! Simply fantastic exponents of what Budo Taijutsu can do for you.

I think any practitioner owes it to themselves to practice their basics and have strong foundational skills. Add in a little alive training (does not have to be much) and look out. Do that and in the future the opinion of the Bujinkan around the world may change!

Of cousre the above it just ones person's opinon.

Brian R. VanCise
http://brianvancise.wordpress.com/
www.instinctiveresponsetraining.com

Posted on: 2008/5/30 23:37
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Re: Important Notice Regarding Blacklisting of Individuals
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Thanks Shawn!

Posted on: 2008/5/10 8:42
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Re: Zero Points
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Lots of great rave reviews for Rob! Keep up the good work!

Posted on: 2008/4/30 7:19
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Re: what are you training?
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Quote:

Papa-san wrote:
"I see Hatsumi sensei as that sort of master blender."

Dale I very much appreciate this view!! Sensei has taken all the traditions of which he is Soke and made a "Bujinkan" from them. His movement (IMO) demonstrates this blending. Each of the different ryu have value but blended together they are more then the sum of their parts.
OK, I am one that thinks our art is continuing to grow and expand, not everything out there, in the martial arts will fit what we do and it really takes someone with a lot of understanding to decide which will fit and which will not. Those of us who have experienced other arts before coming to the Bujinkan will have in our movement "some" of that influence. This in not necessarily a bad thing. It does mean that we must be even more aware of the "does it work" idea. Your own body is one of the best evaluators of what works for you and I for one think you need to honestly listen to it. As far as the cross training, well you must be able to see what helps you and what is just attitudinal BS. Be careful of also accepting the attitude of some of those arts, no matter what they say you aren't made of steel. As far as a "seemless" system in the MMA, what I usually see is just brute force and that, for most of us, is absolutely the wrong way to go. The less youth, strength, and size you have the more you must rely on subtlety. Subtlety is always an advantage even if you are big, strong, young, and fast.


Nice post Ed! While I do not agree totally on your point on MMA being brute force as they do have some very refined techniques and movement that works very well without strength. The rest of your post is absolutely great particularly on your body being the evaluator of what works for you! Thanks again for the post!

Brian R. VanCise
www.instinctiveresponsetrining.com
http://brianvancise.wordpress.com/

Posted on: 2008/4/29 22:33
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Re: what are you training?
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Quote:

Boggs wrote:
Quote:

My point was that your change of opinion from one extreme to the other seems to have evolved within little over a year. Many of us have been in the same boat as you are now but remember it will probably take quite a few years of training in martial arts which use shiai as a tool for growth before you finally come back to see what is spectacular about BBT. Remember that Hatsumi and Nagato came in from that background and were completely converted. I understand now too.


My most extreme change occured when I shut my brain off and listened to "this is how you train" from people in Japan and around the world and took it as some kind of Gospel. Before that I did train in everything I could find, and trained hard. The extreme I took was turning off the critical thinking part of my brain and accepting things just because "senior" people said them.

Before my BBT days I did TKD, I did Aikido for seven years and while studying Aikido the first UFC came out (the ones without the rules) and the gracies dominated. So we began to work on BBJ when I was still in high school, though admitedly not under a certified instructor. Also while taking Aikido one of the instructors was a black belt in some kind of full contact karate and I was his sparring buddy (dummy) for years, two other guys (big twins) were black belts in TKD and I sparred witht hem at least a few times a month. Also in our school we had a Jujutsu school that held a monthly fight night and invited any schools who wanted to attend where we sparred just hands, hands and feet and then did grappling. During one of these fight nights a bunch of Bud's students came in with a video camera to show how good Ninjas they were and every single one of them god stomped.

My first BBT instructor taught BBJ and did tons of mitt drills and weapons sparring, when I moved to Baltimore we devoted entire classes to "dealing with a boxer," or ground fighting.

So I used to train the way that I advocate now, but again as the political structure changed and these Rank Giants emerged that we are supposed to listen to I was a good little soldier and I did my best to follow what was being put out there as "proper."

My first rule for martial arts is that it has to work. If it does not work, put it aside for now and revisit it later, if it still doesn't work after coming back to it several times then it's probably crap. Why I ever shelved my first rule is beyond me, I guess I just really wanted to jump up and down and yell "I BELIEVE, I BELIVE!!!"

Quote:

My opinion is pretty solid and has been formed over more than 20 years now. But I recognize that my opinion is not widely accepted within the Bujinkan community. I accept that there are many different ideas permeating here and I accept this. Maybe many years from now my budo will be strong enough that people will accept these opinions on the basis of seeing it. Maybe my budo never be that great and my theories will fade away.


I just broke out a calculator and I'm only at 17 years, unless you count the three years I did as a kid:) What I have remembered is that organized faiths will hold onto their dogma like a hunk of concete even as it drags them to the bottom of the ocean when all they need to do is leg go and swim to freedom. If people are not capable of using their own reasoning then they are in a cult, not a martial art.


I think it is very important to never shut off your brain and to always question. I also think that any good teacher will always tell you that there are no absolutes. Nothing will work all the time and vice versa sometimes the most unlikely thing will work.

Brian R. VanCise
www.instinctiveresponsetraining.com
http://brianvancise.wordpress.com/

Posted on: 2008/4/24 23:34
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