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Re: Body Conditioning
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I do Warrior Fitness. :o)

Posted on: 2012/2/25 11:54
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Warrior Fitness Guide to Striking Power is HERE!
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Dear All,

The Warrior Fitness User Guide Series Presents:
Warrior Fitness Guide to Striking Power – Level 1

by Jonathan Haas, founder of Warrior Fitness Training Systems

* Specific Physical Preparedness for ALL striking arts from old school Traditional Martial Arts to modern MMA!
* Learn how to build a powerful structure to stabilize punches, kicks, and martial movement!
* Learn how to use low-tech, high yield tools to strengthen strikes throughout a range of motion!
* Sledge Hammer for force production, rotational strength, grip strength, and old school conditioning!
* Medicine Ball for explosive strength and rotational strength!
* Resistance Bands for force production, rotational strength, increased stabilization!
* Bodyweight Exercise and Isometrics for structure and stabilization!
* Learn how to use Intelligent Tension rather than general tension to power strikes!
* Learn Breathing and vibration exercises for recovery and restoration!
* Over 50 pages of pure, 100% actionable content – no fluff, no BS, no filler!
* Sample Workouts!



Please check it out HERE!

Thanks,

Jon Haas
www.warriorfitness.org
www.shinobi.org

Posted on: 2011/7/29 23:15
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Re: Dojo near Mt Laurel, NJ?
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One more option for you... My good friend, Chris Rydbom, has a training group in Medford, NJ. It's a little closer to you in Mt. Laurel. Check out his website here - http://sites.google.com/site/medfordbujinkan/

Hope that helps!

Posted on: 2011/5/23 7:41
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Re: The Shuriken Thread
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Good stuff, Duncan. Thanks for sharing! Another idea for those who don't have any shuriken, or don't have a safe practice area in which to throw them, is to use business cards or playing cards. Not a perfect substitute, but you can practice the movement and accuracy in a safe manner without putting holes in your walls. :)

Posted on: 2011/5/23 2:27
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Re: Dojo near Mt Laurel, NJ?
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We train every Saturday in Mercer County Park. It's only about 35 minutes from Mt. Laurel. Check it out - www.shinobi.org

Let me know if you'd like to come by.

Thanks,

Posted on: 2011/5/16 6:15
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Re: The Most Direct Path
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Good thoughts, Matt. Thanks for posting! How are you enjoying Bujinkan training so far?

Posted on: 2011/5/12 5:15
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Re: The Most Direct Path
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Quote:

Zenigata wrote:
I assume that you mean that the student needs to develop fitness above the level of performance of the activity because he needs it for self defence. But what if he doesn't want to learn self defense? Does he have to to make you happy?


I would argue that yes a student does need to develop fitness above the level of performance of the activity, but not necessarily for self defense purposes only. Proper fitness training will enhance any activity, as well as aid in injury prevention by strengthening joints and muscles slightly outside the range and depth of the activity being performed. And please don't be silly - no one has to train in fitness least of all to make me happy. My students, like yours, are free to pursue it or not as they wish.

Quote:
On the purest path budo is studied for budo's own sake. If you decide you need to add something to support one of your other goals or interests that's fine but it is not the most direct path since the time consumed doing this other thing is not being used directly in pursuit of training in accurate performance of the budo being studied.


Fair enough.

Quote:
My point isn't "this is the way you have to train" but to try and identify the shortest path to budo mastery with no attachment to any goal, ambition or desire other than perfection itself. Once that is identified then as you add your supportive and/or supplimentary goals / interests you can still stick as closely as possible to the direct path.


Okay, but how then do you define "budo mastery"? Since these arts were born in combat and Sensei constantly refers to how he is the only one still teaching them as they were used/taught during Sengoku Jidai when did pursing budo for budo's sake become the goal? And, if that is the goal, then again, how do you define mastery? BTW, please understand that I am not asking these questions to annoy you, but am honestly interested in your response. I hope that you, like me, are enjoying the discussion of different viewpoints and not getting frustrated.

Quote:
But looking at the list I wrote on the blog how many people practice ALL those other things and do no work on working through the flow of basic movements while concentrating on maintaining the correct basic mechanics?


True. I do agree with you that those things should be supplemental and not consume the entirety of one's training time.

Thanks,

Posted on: 2011/5/1 21:20
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Re: The Most Direct Path
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Perhaps. But, if we are to use your race car performance analogy, we still encounter various problems. One being that a race car's performance is dependant simply on the ability to go round and round a track as fast as possible. The number of variables required for that type of performance are very small and do not change. Yes, there's some agility required, to pass and manueuver, but again in a very limited scope. Now, take that same performance race car, which performed admiraby well around the track and put it into a smash up derby? What happened to its performance?

Or, from a different angle, a high performance race car requires a stronger, more fit engine than your run of the mill sedan. That high performance race car also must have a bigger gas tank to fuel it so that it doesn't run out of gas during the race. How do we (as humans - not cars) build a bigger gas tank? Conditioning. Fitness is required to be able to run (drive) that race to the finish line.

Just my perspective. So, it really depends on your definition of performance, I guess. What race are you training for? :)

Posted on: 2011/4/30 21:54
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Re: The Most Direct Path
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Quote:

Zenigata wrote:
You are completely missing my point here.


Okay. Can you please help me to understand it then? I think the words you used in your post kind of rubbed me the wrong way because you say "good performance of budo". This makes me think of a show - something superficial and lacking depth. It could just be the way you worded it. I'm perfectly willing to admit I misunderstood. :)
Can you expand more on what you mean because I don't think I'm the only one completely missing your point.

Thanks in advance.

Posted on: 2011/4/24 21:50
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Re: The Most Direct Path
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Quote:

Zenigata wrote:

b. Don't borrow the authority of Hatsumi-sensei and Takamatsu-sensei. Anyway, I don't agree since my understanding is their training being of the type I described in my article. In fact 95% of the training I have done in Japan with my sensei and sempai have been of this sort.


I wasn't borrowing their authority, merely using an example to illustrate my point. For example, I would seriously doubt that a warrior who had to behead people in China wasn't concerned about the combat effectiveness of his art.

People seem to think they are training properly as long as they copy the form correctly, but what's truly important in budo lies not in the form (solely), but where the form is not. Although I do think form is important, it's not the end all be all of our study, nor should it be the only place our concentration and focus lie. If it is, then I believe it becomes a direct path to medocrity.

Thanks,

Posted on: 2011/4/23 22:56
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