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   All Posts (Shinobiko)


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Re: Two different streams?
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It has been my experience that the people who want more tend to find it; at leas those I train wtih. These folks show up early for class or stay after and ask additional questions or train longer. I also have a class that is a little off schedule and not many people show up. Those who do are typically those who want more.

Jeff

Posted on: 2007/9/12 3:24
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Re: How do you teach the year's theme on your Dojo?
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This is the first year I have tried to follow the theme fairly closely. Prior to that, I would do some of the theme but felt like I had to stick too close to the basics to venture out much. I have found in my of my students, though, that if I expose them to the "higher order" stuff like the theme of the year, their basics get better. For example, I tell them they need to get their front roll down; then when they get tossed with some speed during class, they get the idea of what they have to do. The same goes with SSnK and KH. Right now, I open the doors to class an hour early. I have beginning students come then and I work wtih them on basic stuff. More advanced students come then to stretch for class, warmup, etc.; and they often get involved in helping me with newer students. When it is time for class, everyone gets in the same group and we work on the theme of the year. Given the number of weapons to cover, I am doing one class on dakentaijutsu and one class on weapons.

Jeff

Posted on: 2007/9/6 5:31
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Re: Kuki swordwork
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I understand what you are saying Coyote. I too think it is very important that we understand this art in its original and historical contents; and I don't think Duncan or Ed would disagree with that. HOWEVER, if you are going to understand the true nature of Kukishin and it's kamae, you have to do it with the proper situation. Kukishin was designed to work with heavy armor. Having fought with current armor plus packs, etc., I can tell you that your stances are much lower. Otherwise, you will lose your balance easily. When you don't have that same kind of weight, there is no reason to have low statnces becasue it does severerly limit your mobility. And doing the kata with low stances does not IMHO mimick what you are dealing with in armor. If you want the true measure of the kamae, put on a backpack with about 60 pounds of sandbags in it and do the kata.

Jeff Walker

Posted on: 2007/8/22 2:51
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Re: Are you the Sufi or the magician?
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I know for a fact there are people who fit the exact profile you are talking about. I hope that is not me. I don't think anything is possible, but I do think you have to make choices. It is unlikely I will ever be that good with the naginata. There are entire arts that deal with nothing but this, and it can be worked on for years. I am not going to do that. That doesn't mean I am copping out or trying to be mediocre (at least I don't think) I try to learn as much as I can about it and train on it when it is a part of the theme. The fact that I am not going to take an extra day of my week to work on naginata should not be taken as an acceptance of mediocrity. Or if it is, then fine -- call me mediocre.

Jeff

Posted on: 2007/8/2 12:55
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Re: Are you the Sufi or the magician?
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I agree with Adrian's post, but there is some problems in that logic. That is, we often cannot know what is in the mind of the person making those statements. Is this person just lazy and does not want to learn kenjustu? Or did this person find he was not good at kenjutsu, so he puts it down? Or does the person believe there are other weapons that can do just as much as a sword and are much more likely to be encountered in today's world? I think the differences in those motivivations makes a big difference. I do not train a lot with a sword. I have them, I try to train very hard and to the best of my ability when it is a part of the year's focus, and I do (and enjoy) tameshigeri. But it is much more practical for me to spend my time when I am not focused on the year's theme to work with something like a knife or hanbo becasue that is something I may very well use. Now, I try hard to never make the kinds of statements Adrian was talking about, because I don't want to discourage others. And I always try to help students who want to learn kenjutsu, or try to hook them up with a teacher who does focus on that if that is what they want. But it is the motivation that may be bad, not the statement themselves. A person who doesn't like ground fighting may work very hard and become very skilled in other parts of this art that keep you standing up and doing damage from there. There is a lot to this art and it is difficult (impossible) to become skilled at everything. People have to pick and choose to a certain degree. For me, as long as it is not the excuses, it is not mediocraty,l it is just a choice.

Jeff

Posted on: 2007/8/2 3:48
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Re: What weapons to buy?
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I was basing my opinion to get a shinai off of what the hombu uses. Typically it is a shinai rather than a bokken. I use shinai in class more (especially with newer students) because of the safety. I can certainly see the value of using a bokken though.

Jeff

Posted on: 2007/8/2 3:34
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Re: What weapons to buy?
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Unless you are in a dojo that does a lot of kenjutsu, I would skip the katana and wakishashi for now. I agree with Daniel that a shinai would be good. I would also get a good training tanto. Whether to get a bo/jo/hanbo depends on your teacher. In my dojo, we do a lot of bo and hanbo work, so those would be next for me; but that doesn't hold for a lot of people. Again, unless your instructor tells you to or you will be training on them soon, I would skip the KF and shuko. But again, that is just me -- you should ask your teacher.

Jeff

Posted on: 2007/8/1 10:33
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Re: Dhatu Vada Kata (subtitled, the myth of the correct kata)
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Quote:

TenChiJin Guy wrote:

Sorry for the misunderstanding: it came from your second sentence which read: "I spend a fair amount of time talking to newer students trying to get them to understand that there is no particularly "right" or "perfect" kata, but there are what I would consider "wrong" ways. If you don't think there is a right way... then how are you trying to get a perfect kata?


Fair enough. Let me explain what I mean. I teach, say, sui no kata a particular way that I currently believe to be the most proper way I can do it. That has changed over the years as I have learned more, talked to people who are supposed to know more, etc. Then I have a student come to me and say something like "I got a video of XX, and he does it this way. Which is right." I try to point out that this person may be doing it exactly as he thinks is best and I am doing it the way I think is best. I don't want to engage in a "he is right and I am wrong." Maybe both are right. Maybe this person did it exactly the way Hatsumi did it several years ago and I am doing it the way he does it now. Which is right? That is why I say there is no particularly "right" way. Plus, I may change the way I do it as I learn. Then I have told them what is "right" then tell them that is wrong and this is "right".

Quote:

TenChiJin Guy wrote:
The other part of my question assumed that you were learning the kata from Ed: The fact that my kata looks a bit different from Papasan's is fine -- as long as we are both continually working on making it better.


I did learn a lot of kata from Ed. I learned others from other people. I try to always check what I learn from anyone with Hatsumi, the Japanese shihan and others. Ed and I agree on a lot of the kata. In other places we do not agree. But that is ok because we respect each other and each other's rights to teach the way we want. Your example is a good one. The KSR kata are often five-step. I teach the whole thing all the way through each time and each kata. Ed does not because he argues it is the same up to the last punch. If I had a student that asked me about that, I would put it in the category of "that is the way he does it and explain how I do it and why."

Jeff

Posted on: 2007/8/1 8:09
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Re: Dhatu Vada Kata (subtitled, the myth of the correct kata)
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Quote:

TenChiJin Guy wrote:
Quote:

Shinobiko wrote:
...I will never get the perfect kata. That is not the goal, though. The goal is the process of working on getting the perfect kata.


Honestly, I don't understand this...

The goal "should be" the perfect kata - Right???

You may never reach it... but why on earth aren't you trying to get there?

Why are you even working on kata when you know the source for the information is considerably flawed? It makes no sense to ask for directions from someone who doesn't know the way to where you want to go, does it?

Or maybe that is why your goal isn't to get the perfect kata?

Honestly curious,

-Daniel


I thought I was quite clear Daniel. I don't see how you could get that I was not trying to get to the perfect kata. After all, even the next part of my statement that you quoted indicated the goal is the process of getting the perfect kata. Of course I am trying to get there. Does the fact that I doubt I will ever be as good as Hatsumi sensei mean I am not trying to learn?

Jeff

Posted on: 2007/7/31 12:35
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Re: Dhatu Vada Kata (subtitled, the myth of the correct kata)
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A very difficult task indeed. I spend a fair amount of time talking to newer students trying to get them to understand that there is no particularly "right" or "perfect" kata, but there are what I would consider "wrong" ways. I see it like this. I will never get the perfect kata. That is not the goal, though. The goal is the process of working on getting the perfect kata. The goal is not to get to the top of the mountain, the goal is to learn from the walk along the way. The fact that my kata looks a bit different from Papasan's is fine -- as long as we are both continually working on making it better. The "wrong" comes in for me when people say "Hatsumi says make this art your own. I don't really like this kata; I like the way we did it when I was studying Xdo. So I am going to do it that way. Therefore, I am done, I have it." I will never get all of this art -- maybe none of it. But that is ok. It is the path of purification -- not the end -- that matters to me.

Jeff

Hi Ed! One flight from the house. Be home tomorrow!

Posted on: 2007/7/30 13:08
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