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Re: Shields and the samurai?
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Slightly off-topic, but I have been told by a reenactor friend that he has seen police riot shields demolished by an axe. Which rather surprises me. I never pursued the circumstances, but could probably get more details if anyone's interested.

I assume you are thinking of fairly large shields like batwings or pavises. How would one use such a shield if you have both hands on the sword? In Europe there was a lot of single-hand sword use, which meant that sword and buckler or sword and shield was a fairly common combination.

What sort of single-handed Japanese weapons would work well with a shield?

I guess there are also targes which can be used strapped to the forearm, leaving the second hand free to hold a weapon, but the movement with it would be fairly restricted.

Posted on: 2005/7/19 20:37
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Re: bokuto
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As I pointed out in the last thread "boku" means wood.

To and Ken both mean sword. If I'm not mistaken, it's the same kanji, and 'to' (or is it 'tou'?) is the kunyomi or "Japanese" reading, while 'ken' is the onyomi or "Chinese" reading.

boku + ken just gets shortened to bokken because...err..because it does :D Probably just because it's easier to say.

Posted on: 2005/5/27 1:52
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Re: Problems with falling
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Quote:

Sachse wrote:

yesterday in training i thought a bit about it and found that falling as a result of beeing thrown is easier with people I trust ( at least a bit) than with people I don't trust. sounds silly doesn't it? I think practice (and I guess alot of practice) it will ease and after your comments I hope it will go away eventually.


It certainly doesn't sound silly. The more you can trust your training partner, the more you can both learn - you are concentrating on the bits of technique that you want to sort out, not worrying about that your partner will do something completely unexpected.

Of course, once you have the technique down pat then you move on to the "difficult" uke... :)



Posted on: 2005/5/26 2:37
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Re: Battlefield techniques
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Thanks for that, Andy.

Answers some questions ;)

If you remember some of way back then (98 was it?), maybe I could come up and visit you at some point and play...I might even be able to supply a small troupe of reenactors to practice against (and maybe a couple of Bujinkaners, too).

Unfortunately Australia's a bit far for me, so Evan's training camp is out of the picture for the now; Wales is certainly more accessible!

Posted on: 2005/5/25 0:02
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Battlefield techniques
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Which ryu specifically include battlefield techniques? I remember once doing some 'as-if-wearing-armour' movement stuff, and I assume that implies that whichever ryu that came from included battlefield training rather than just one-on-one -while-wearing-armour training.

Does anyone actually train in larger groups - as if on a battlefield?

I do reenactment training, where the whole focus is towards being able to fight in a line or in a group. With restricted movement, some of the techniques we normally practice in the dojo would be impractical; plus you have to remember that the guys to the left and right of you are friends, which not only means not hitting them with your strikes, but also not deflecting your opponent's strikes to hit them (something I seem particularly good at doing - at least it gives me a bit more space to work in!)

I'm also interested in the more tactical and strategic considerations - how to organise a battlefield group, how to move them to get desired results, etc.

Posted on: 2005/5/24 22:14
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Re: Why do we call it Japan?
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Mistaking "tantou" for "tonto"?

Perhaps you mispronounced the first syllable :P

'tanto' in Spanish would be 'much'.

Anyway, I'd look at you a little oddly if you pointed at me and said "knife! knife!"

I understand the feeling that Spanish and Japanese vowels (in particular) seem to be pronounced the same. I remember trying to say something to my Host Mother when I was in Japan, completely missing the fact that I was using a word in Spanish ("muro" for wall, iirc) - just because the whole sound "felt" right for it to be Japanese. It took me ages to work out why she was looking so bemused!

Posted on: 2005/5/21 2:32
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Re: Kutaki's random quotes.
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If 'evil' and 'good' are just words...

An individual defines those words in his/her own context.

A society defines them within its context.

If an individual is a member of that society, then his definitions are tainted by the society's definitions.

...or is the society's definition tainted by the definitions of its members?

(Devil's Advocate? Maybe just a little :)


Posted on: 2005/5/20 19:57
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Re: Training weapon names
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Yes....but it's not specifically a _wooden_ short sword. It's the "boku" in "bokuto" and "bokken" that means 'wood'.

However, I've never been entirely sure what the difference (if any) between a shoto and a wakizashi is....anyone care to enlighten (or point at a website that has accurate info).

(Failing that, I'll get a friend to lend me his book on arms and armour - it's a quite encyclopaedic resource for all periods and all areas)

Posted on: 2005/5/19 2:29
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Re: Thanks Shawn and Ed "Papa-San"
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I would also like to give a very big thank you to everyone.

The organisation was excellent (I even got my lunch on Saturday, despite having left my tickets at the hotel)

The atmosphere was superb (everyone got along as if they had known you before that day)

And the instruction was great - there was so much there, that I think I can remember about a 10th of it. I really hope my muscle memory is better! Definitely looking forward to the DVD.

While I have no complaints, I would like to make two suggestions:

1) Credit cards accepted at the 'shop'. (I don't know if you had a reason for not accepting them, but I heard several people (including myself) asking if you could accept them)

2) Rental (or loan?) of weapons. While most people were able to bring their own, some people were not able to for various reasons (for example, airline charges/refusal). It would be nice to be able to borrow a 'seminar' weapon for the day; especially if something other than bokken/hanbo/bo is going to be used. Yes, I appreciate that you cannot supply 200-odd weapons, but would a 'limited number' not be possible?

(As always, please don't flame - I fully appreciate that there are issues that may not make either of the above possible.)

Posted on: 2005/5/18 20:57
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Re: Real Fighting, the truth according to me
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Quote:

antizen wrote:

And by the way, I'm not at all impressed by anyone claiming to have never lost a fight. What interests me is someone who has seriously had their ass kicked. *THAT* is useful experience.


One of the things I actually remember _learning_ at university (indeed, perhaps the only really useful thing) was that failure is more instructive than success. I certainly noticed that I tended to have more to write about in my lab reports than the people who always got it right!

Quote:

Sorry for the rant.


Good rant :)


Posted on: 2005/4/21 0:44
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