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Re: Self-practice
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Hi Amaterasu,

I personally feel the Tai-Chi method is great for Taijutsu. If you ever get to train with Ed Martin at a European seminar, you will find his method of training slowly and fluidly very much like the feel of Tai Chi.

If you get a chance to train with Sensei and some of the other Shihan, you will see (and feel if one of the Shihan shows you a technique personally) as to how soft and fluid their movement is (almost like Tai chi Push-hands or some Kung Fu sticking hands).

It’s a great way to understand centre of balance and create internal power if you practice as you do each day.

Cheers,

David Smith

Posted on: 2005/7/20 9:27
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Re: Standardized curriculum?
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Tenchijin is a good guide so one can understand THE BASICS (Sanshin, Kihon, etc), and communicate to other people you train with by using a common language. Yet I personally feel that an attempt to teach life-saving lessons in a set organised structure (eg: at 5th Kyu Koku and Oni Kudaki must be done to pass this level), goes against the passing of natural wisdom and learning. Hence, one of the reasons I feel that the only “official” test in Bujnikan is the Shinsa (Intuition Test) for Shidoshi licence and privilege.

Just imagine passing on life-lessons to your children via a set structured manner; you’re the parent, shouldn’t you know what your children need in order to function in society? Martial arts are a life lesson too, so each “parent” (Sensei) should pass on what they feel will get their “children” (students) through understanding the “social skills” (self-preservation concepts and fundamentals) so they can function in “society” (the Dojo and the street).

We must remember that not all people who learn Bujinkan (and have a high rank) want to be a teacher. So, they may not be concerned about what this technique is called or how many Ryu Bujinkan has. They may simply be in it for the sheer expression of the spirit through martial arts. Their grade may be an offer of acknowledgement from their Sensei to show that they have progressed (maybe not even on a physical skill level, but perhaps on an emotional, or even spiritual one).

These are just my personal thoughts and are not to say that anyone else’s posts are wrong or right. Just something that I feel hasn’t been raised in this discussion.

Cheers,

Posted on: 2005/5/11 16:27
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Re: Kihon Happo
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Someya Sensei taught a small group of us the Kihon Happo he stated was taught to him by Soke. The list was as follows:

Ichimonji
Hicho
Jumonji
Omote Gyaku
Omote Gyaku Ken Sabaki
Ura Gyaku
Musha Dori
Ganseki Nage

He stated that Oni Kudaki was added by Manaka Sensei and that it is from Takagi Yoshin Ryu, but some people add it to their versions. Kihon Happo appears to be very adaptable, so I guess there’s no rigid way to do it unless you are going by the Gyokko Ryu method.

Cheers,

Posted on: 2005/5/9 12:11
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Re: Hotels in Kashiwa?
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Hi Michael,

Here's a link to the Kashiwa Plaza location:

http://www.rs.noda.sut.ac.jp/~oryu/CONF/HOTEL-B.html

Cheers,

Posted on: 2005/5/6 14:53
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Re: Virtual Bujinkan Photo Exhibition Online
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Wonderful pics.

Cheers

Posted on: 2005/5/3 15:54
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RE: Why do you practice martial arts
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I got into martial arts after seeing “The Karate Kid” because of the mystery and morality that surrounded Mr Miyagi’s teaching (I was 9). During this I read books by Stephen K. Hayes and the practicality of Bujinkan came into play. It wasn’t until 16 that I travelled out of my town each weekend to train with a (then) authentic Bujinkan school (that teacher left Bujinkan eventually to form his own expression of Ninjutsu). Eventually I moved onto Kung Fu and back into Bujinkan with a new group of teachers who train with Soke. (Sorry for my personal martial art history lesson).

But as I grew in age the fantasy need was outweighed by the practical need and Bujinkan covered all aspects of self-preservation that other martial arts did not address.

Cheers

Posted on: 2005/4/29 13:16
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Re: Japanese Tai Chi?
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Try doing Sanhsin Kata slow and with deep postures. Breathe in through the nose and out through the mouth as you would Tai Chi or other internal arts. Remember these evolved from Chinese systems. I always refer to Bujinkan as being Tai Chi sped up.

A sticking-hands approach can be taken if you apply a slow and fluid movement when doing Kihon Happo or other Kata with a partner.

Cheers

Posted on: 2005/4/27 16:54
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Re: Togakure Ryu,Gyokko Ryu, Koto Ryu
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I believe that the Sanshin, Kihon Happo and three basic Muto Dori were labelled as Ninpo Taijutsu, and we all know they came from Gyokko Ryu. So I guess they intertwine and people can use whatever labels suit them. Even Koto Ryu Koppojutsu has been called Karate (Chinese hand) and the Iga ryu system of Ninja combat was called Karate (again, Chinese Hand) by Sandayu Momochi.

http://www.winjutsu.com/source/sandayu.html

Plus, one of the Gyokko Ryu scrolls on the Takamatsu DVD has “Ninpo” labelled on it.

cheers

Posted on: 2005/4/27 16:01
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Re: women's training?
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Sorry, double post.

Posted on: 2005/4/22 10:58
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Re: women's training?
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Greg, I totally agree that we should avoid brute force in Bujinkan, but from my experience, while there are good male practitioners who understand relaxed power, I’ve also witnessed some guys who still hold on to the “bang-it-‘till-it-breaks” philosophy. Kami help them when they get older and their muscle-mass doesn’t work as they expected it to. Hence I guess our discussion about the advantages of males understanding female movement in Bujinkan.

Females also teach us the beneficial aspect of the human heart and the need for compassion, like Kaela’s apologies after her use of brute and aggression hurts someone.
Quote:

antizen wrote:
[quote]
I train with Sheila often here in Monterey. She's wonderful. The whole issue of strength is really a non-issue in my experience since we're not suppose to be using strength anyway.

For brute force and agression however I would have to nominate my 12 yr. old 4th kyu daughter, Kaela. The nice thing is she usually apologizes after she hurts someone.


Posted on: 2005/4/22 10:58
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