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Japanese required?
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Thanks Brian!

Unfortunately, if I'm not wrong the info inside is only useful if you can understand Japanese, isn't it?

Or are the pictures clear understanding enough?

Alvin

Posted on: 2003/8/27 14:53
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What is in the Ima Ninja book?
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There's a book displayed on Richard Donk's website, Ima Ninja, and the description is thus:

Quote:
Ima Ninja - Kono Chitekihenshinjutsu (Now Ninja - Mental Disguise Technique) This is the reprint of the first of two philosophy books written by Hatsumi Masaaki. 5 Chapters. The first four chapters consist of 61 seperate short essays. The 5th Chapter focuses in detail on recommendations for diet and health. Specifically, the last 15 pages is about Hichibuku Goshinjutsu theory and technique (this information has been out since 1981). Hichibuku Goshinjutsu is part of Amatsu Tatara. Includes several pages of illustrations of recommended breathing/stretching exercises and seitai techniques. The cover you see in the picture is the new design. Author: Hatsumi Masaaki Year: 2001 Pages: 230 pages Photos are in Black and White


Does anyone who has this book and can read it maybe tell me more about what's in this book? And is Ninpo Wisdom for Life the translation for this book or another?

Thanks.

Alvin Soon

Posted on: 2003/8/26 15:11
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Alvin Soon
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Reviews of 1998 & 2000 Daikomyosai videos?
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Hi all,

as I've come into a little extra cash I was thinking of getting one of the Daikomyosai videos.

Browsing around on Richard Donk's site I was thinking of either the 1998 Shinden Fudo Ryu one or the 2000 Koppojutsu one. But the descriptions given make it hard for me to choose.

I was wondering if anyone who had these vids could give me a brief review of their contents that I might better make a choice?

Any help would be appreciated, thanks

Alvin Soon
Singapore

Posted on: 2003/8/24 16:58
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Alvin Soon
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Cost of training & staying?
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Hi all!

Well, I've never been to Japan for training, so I was wondering if anyone could give me a clue. Lets say I was to stay a week around a place close to the Honbu dojo for training, making whatever training I could fit into a week, how much can I expect to pay for everything? That is, training, accomodation, transport, food? I'd just like to hear an estimate based on experience.

Posted on: 2003/6/8 22:58
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Alvin Soon
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What was Ninjutsu?
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I have a general sketchy idea of what Ninjutsu was through speaking with my teacher and from reading. Sensei's not a big history buff tho and I was wondering if anyone could help me clear up my perceptions here.

I'm not a big history buff either so I'm going to speak generally, and not go into details.

From what I understand, ninjas were considered the 'black ops' groups of samurais, like the SAS or Delta Force modern day equivalents. These 'black ops' specialities, eg stealth, intelligence gathering, silent insertion skills (pardon my abuse of military terms if any...I'm not a military buff either, everything I learnt from the video games) were given the blanket term of 'ninjutsu'.

For these ninjas though, ninjutsu was considered only a subset of skills that they had to learn. In that, ninjutsu was not a fighting style per se, but a set of 'black ops' skills. The fighting and weapons skills weren't visibly or all that different between the various ninja and samurai schools, so there wasn't a 'ninja' style of fighting opposed to a 'samurai' style of fighting.

Am I correct so far? I ask for your patience if I'm seriously mangaling it up.

In effect, to lead up to what we are practicing modern day, Bujinkan Taijutsu. As far as we are only learning the fighting arts, that is taijutsu, it is not ninjutsu. Only the other non-fighting skills like the ninja aruki are considered ninja skills. Am I correct to say this?

Posted on: 2003/6/1 12:24
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Translations of the Ryu names
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Hi all,

I'd thought I'd take a stab at translating the 9 ryu names, looking at the kanji on my membership card. I'd like any additional info or clarifications on my efforts if possible. Thanks!

Togakure Ryu = No idea :P

Gyokko Ryu = Jade Tiger School.

Kukishinden = Legend of the 9 Ghosts/Demons School.

Koto Ryu = Tiger Felling School.

Gikan Ryu = No idea, that's really old kranji.

Shindenfudo Ryu = The Immovable Legend(s) of the God(s) School.

Gyokushin Ryu = Jade Heart School.

Kumogakure Ryu = The Cloud School (?)

Takagiyoshin Ryu = I'm not very sure, but I think Takagi is the name of a person, and I'm not sure what yoshin means

Posted on: 2003/6/1 12:12
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Interesting experience doing Sanshin with my eyes closed
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OK, I'm sure I'm not the first one to have tried this out, but I just wanted to share my own experience because it was quite an interesting one for me.

On a lark, one day while I was practicing the sanshin alone, I decided to do it with my eyes closed. Whoa! What a difference! Suddenly, when it seemed easy to move and keep my balance, now my balance was all over the place. I was really surprised, and it added a whole dimension to my training experience.

Somehow not being able to see changed my kinesthetic awareness radically. Anyone else have had this kind of experience? I'm sure that I'm going to play with this kind of training more from now on.

Posted on: 2003/6/1 6:16
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Re: Chi & Jing Training in the Bujinkan
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So let me sum up what I've learnt here:

There is no chi & jing taught in the Bujinkan, not like other martial arts with still and moving meditation, guided imagery, visualizations, and physical movements coupled with breathing exercises.

All the seemingly 'miraculous' things that Soke does (like where he shakes off his students with an 'energy shell' on the last page of Ninjutsu: History And Tradition) is a result of and can be obtained by correct training in bujinkan taijutsu.

Posted on: 2003/6/1 6:07
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Interesting
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Quote:
Budo is moving meditation. In time, you gain the state of "no-mind," which is what people are sitting on their butts trying to achieve. In time, you also gain "ki" (for those of you who believe in it), which allows you to use "kiai" (true kiai, not the grunting of a base Karateka) and "kihaku." Both kiai and kihaku are part of Soke's teachings, but you still don't see people running around in class kiai-ing all the time. Why? Because that is a crass way to learn this stuff. If you just do Budo, everything else will come....


Hmm...interesting. I've never thought about it this way before, nor have I ever seen it. All that stuff where Soke (and other martial artists) throws people without touching them and drops people with just kiai comes from training in body movements?

How can something so 'miraculous' come out from training in physical ways of moving the body? Why can't NBA's top atheletes do this?? Just kidding, but I am wondering about how taijutsu is ki training...

Posted on: 2003/5/24 17:01
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Soke's quote
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From 'The Grandmaster's Book of Ninja Training'

When your taijutsu is perfected, I will teach you then. When a person's taijutsu has reached a level of development suitable for the kuji, I will teach him. If I did not wait, the results could be disastrous. If I taught it too early, the student would probably just get hurt. Anyway, people who aren't good enough don't particularly want to learn it. Also, it's got to be taught correctly. The instructor has to teach it correctly, as I would. When the student is at the right stage, is of sufficient caliber, I will teach him the kuji. It would be extremely dangerous to teach somebody who is not suitably prepared: it could result in his death. To put it simply, if in a critical situation he tried chanting the kuji thinking that he would disappear, and then didn't disappear, for example...Well, you understand?

Posted on: 2003/5/24 16:47
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Alvin Soon
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