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Re: One year of training...
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Thanks! That's very helpful indeed. But isn't there a dojo any closer to me? Isn't there any smaller dojos close-by, run by some shihan?

Another thing, how do you pay for the sessions? Do I have to bring a fixed amount each session?

Posted on: 2006/5/1 22:04
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Marcus Olsson
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One year of training...
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In the end of this June, I'm going to Tokyo to study japanese, for a year, at a languagecenter. Needless to say, I want to grab this moment to train as much as I can with the elite. As I haven't been to Japan before, there's some things I would like your opinion on.

First of, as a poor student, no matter how much I would like to, I probably wont have the money to attend the sessions at a regular basis. Is it considered rude if I don't attend to all of the sessions?

Second, I would like to ask where I should go and train. I will live somewhere in between Shinjuku and Ikebukuro as the languagecenter is located 3 minutes by foot from the Takadanobaba-station. To minimize the possibilities of totally getting lost I would like to attend sessions as close to me as possible. I've heard Nakadai is teaching somewhere in Shinjuku (or maybe I'm totally off here)?

Hopefully someone know's where Takadanobaba is. At the moment, I'm supposed to live in Shiki if that is of any help.

Additionally, I've heard something about bringing a letter from my instructor here in Sweden. Is that a smart thing to do before I board the plane, or is it the same?

Thanks!
Marcus

Posted on: 2006/4/30 23:40
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Re: Self-practice
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Thanks guys, the mirror-advice got to me. Though my bathroom is pretty small and isn't suited for practicing in, maybe it's worth buying a mirror to put in a bigger room.

I also think it really helps to close your eyes sometimes when you're really trying to get the feeling down 'cause it's easier to feel if your joint and limbs are moving smoothly or if the motion gets interrupted along the way.

Posted on: 2005/7/22 21:45
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Marcus Olsson
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Re: Self-practice
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I think it'll take some time before I get the chance to train with the hotshots, but when I do I promise you I will be there with the notepad and pencil

Actually I got to feel how fluid a technique can be when I trained under Roger Mattson (9th or 10th dan I think). At that time I were really amazed I can tell you. Not only did he do what was necessary to drop me on the floor, but he also managed to pop in about 9 boshiken at different places :D ... had I been one of those weakminded fools, I wouldn't have come to the next practice, i'd tell ya ! :D

I certainly feel that it does wonders for my sense for balance but I'm not that familiar with internal power (though i'm really interested of knowing more about it )

Posted on: 2005/7/21 20:29
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Marcus Olsson
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Taijutsu, you gotta love it
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From my experiences I've noticed that some bujinkan-practitioners tend to have their on "favorite" areas in their taijutsu. Some focus more on striking, others on kicks and some maybe on newaza. It doesn't surprise me though, Bujinkan is quite complete as a martial art and though the ultimate goal is to master all its areas fully, which in my opinion should take more than a lifetime. Like soke once said, unless we train the way he did with Takamatsu-sensei, we will never achieve such results as he did.

Since bujinkan is this complete and since we all have different likes and dislikes. And even though we all became attracted to Bujinkan as a martial art, we, as individuals, still are attracted to different areas of it. I recently saw a video with a german bujinkaneer (lol btw) that was demonstrating "15 techniques in hands". This, to me was really interesting to see, because though the taijutsu was there, the speed and movements of his hands reminded me of Wing Chun actually. That's when I come to realize as a 9th kyu student of Bujinkan: Why seek to practice any other martial art when you can make your taijutsu to fit practically all the aspects you want? That's why I think a bujinkan-practitioner would be quite successful in MMA events if he decided to adapt to their rules (this is however in my opinion to annihilate the budo in it).

This too, is one of the reasons why I like taijutsu like I do. Apart from styles that don't have this kind individualisation, you never really know what another bujinkan-practitioner's got up his sleeve. Unlike karate, where they (IMHO) all have the same kicks and strikes as their opponent. I think this is limiting karate and similiar styles as a martial art. They wouldn't fully know how to deal with someone that doesn't do their style.

If you'd like please add anything that you would like to empathize apart from the foundation. For example like one of my instructors told me: "People tend to underestimate the power of your knees. When you've got him on the ground, go ahead and pummel his brains out" (it was me, by the way, that got to feel the pummeling at this time).

Posted on: 2005/7/21 20:11
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Marcus Olsson
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Self-practice
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First of all i'd like to introduce myself since I just registered here at kutaki. I started training with bujinkan this january (2005) in Sweden and got my 9th kyu some month ago. I personally feel I don't have the knowledge to actually move a discussion forward but instead simply adding my views of the subject. Thus I'm mainly here for "information gathering" yoroshiku onegai shimasu!

Having that said, I will continue with the topic...

Since I'm not that lucky to have someone to practice with during the summer, I've been searching for ways I can "maximize" (lack of better word for it) the results of my training. I think I've somehow understood the importance of a good kihon and I'm now giving myself an half-an-hour to practice sanshin and the movements of the kihon happo. I've found that it's actually quite relaxing at the same time to do everything with a "tai chi-feeling" big and slow movements with some relaxing music in the background. I was wondering if someone else has found the same (or similiar) way of practicing the basics by themselves?

Shikin haramitsu daikomyou !

Marcus Olsson
9th kyu

Posted on: 2005/7/20 4:12
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