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Re: Techniques or concepts?
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don´t think that sience and spiritualism are dealing with the same question but ´cause they are dealing with the same world confusion is predicted.
A scientist is about to solve the question of "how does it goes" and develops a model. The question to be solved by spritual "rersearch " is more like "what is the meaning of". I know it is simplified, but you can write long books about this task and there will still something not covered.

To the "takamtsu sensei tought soke the feeling first"-thing:
Sensei had already quite big exp. in ma at this time. So he was able to feel...

tech. vs conc.:
There are always at least two level of a technique. How often am i standing at class/seminar and try to get what is shown and realize something like: "o.k.in the end it is a kind of chi no kata", but can be sure it will only help me to repeat what is shown, but to catch what is taught i´ll still have to ask the person who is teaching. Often they say sth like, yes you can look at this in the way you do, but try to explore this and that as well...(very polite people, i think)

***offtopic:
Everbody is talking about basics. But if you ask someone to show you kihon he´ll most likely do so and add:
"This is the way I do it."
Do you see the problem?
end of offtopic***

Take care,

Burkhard

Posted on: 2006/4/17 19:45
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Re: Web Suicide Pacts Surge In Japan
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Quote:

Cuthalion wrote:
I have the feeling that this is a "problem of abundance".


Maybe the opposite is also correct, esp. in modern societies there are huge differences between the chances in life for people, depending on the level of education of your parents, the people you know and many more.
In addition to this point (which has been valuable over the times), the speed of development has increased sharply over the last decades. So it gets more and more difficult to follow this process. Third point might be the transparency of possible "going down" by a crisis like unemployment, divorce, decreasing income because of changing cirumstances in your contract etc
So maybe modern societies are "too fast" for some people, who are skilled enough to see the danger but not strong enough to face it. This point of not-being-strong-enough is maybe the result of experiences which tought the person in question to deal with problems by him/her own, instead of seeking help. Because asking for help seems a sign of weekness to them.

Quote:

Cuthalion wrote:
There are so many things to learn and experience out there! If someone can't recognize this, that person is mentally or emotionally "lazy".


So is it possible that they are not "lazy" but tired?

jm2c

Burkhard

Posted on: 2006/2/10 18:02
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Re: Poor Representation of a Bujinkan Member
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Quote:

seryph wrote:
quit beating around the bush, what's the guy's name and what did he do... ...i don't think it a bad idea for the rest of us to know if something funky is going on.


But it is nothing to discuss in this form. I don´t think it would be a good idea to do "like them" and throwing rubbish around the www. I am aware that you (like me as well ) wants to know about problems between people. E.g. to be aware of hidden trapps when interacting with a person don´t know very well and/or not to offend some without need. We should be careful if an open internetforum is a proper tool to spread information like that for ( at least) two reason.
First of all you can not controll who is getting these info and what is he about to do with, worst case could be a kind of "online-whitch-hunting". Even if we try to do it foolproof we´ll fail ´cause as we all know :"fools are inventive!".
Second, we would indicate that it is ok to offend people in this form, which makes it a problem to blame them for doing so.

hope i made my point clear?

regards,

Burkhard

Posted on: 2005/12/27 17:51
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Re: Statistic research: how long have you been training?
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about 13 years (incl. a break of one year bec. milit. service)


Posted on: 2005/11/10 19:59
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Re: How to become a "good" student?
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Quote:

mindwrench wrote:
So, the question is this:
What particular tools or methods do you use to give your students (or yourself) the ABILITIES to emulate the type of movement from a high-level instructor?
Rob


I am not sure if this is the "correct" question if you want to discuss how to become a good student. It might be better to think about how to act in training to get as much as possible from your teacher. Don´t want to chatter about common things like watch carefully etc, but if you have problems with some stuff, try to explore where you loose your way.
Is it e.g.
- the way to move your feet
- the way to break the balance of your uke
- the ankle you should line up to your uke
and much more.
I can imagine that many people are about to reply something like " a good teacher should see this by him-/herself" which is true. But first they are all just humans, experienced ones, but humans. And second I think it is up to me to understand the principles which are taught, so if I realize e.g. that I have general problems with keeping my balance and ask my instructor for help in this problem, the hint will be probably helpfull in more situations then the hint which "make the techn. work"...
To sum up, take as much resonsibility for your own development, because your teacher can help you, but we have to understand that WE HAVE TO DO IT, not anyone else

jm2c



Posted on: 2005/5/6 22:49
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Re: Punching technique
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Quote:

flagship wrote:
Hello brothers in arms...was wondering if one could explain the punching tech in our art.


The very first punch i has been taught was the ´classical´ straight tsuki starting from shizen / ichimonji ending up in a "forward-ichimonji" with the knee of the front leg placed aprox. over the tip of the toes. We were asked to aim not AT the target but on a point 5 - 20 cm behind it depending on the kind of aim.
In the following the repertoire of striking methods increased steadily. Snapping punches, circled blows etc.
I don´t believe that there is a general way to punch. This days i prefer a way of punching by sitting down, this was introduced to me by some kukishinden ryu stuff. It´s interesting for me because i don´t risk my balance while punching. Maybe you have someone who has some exp. in this, asked him for help.
Second hint, try to apply punches "by accident" when doing a technique, that means, you take a step to avoid the attack? Try to hit uke without changing your movement(too much). You shift your balance from left to right leg? Try to explore the punch "hidden" in this movement. etc
When doing you´ll hopefully develop a good feeling for the dependence of your striking technique on the target and your plans(e.g. creating pain, brake sth., balancetaking...).

I know it is allready said, but once more: normaly you use your full body to strike, but you´ll explore many ways to do so. None off them ways is THE right but A right way to do it, if it fits to the situation you have to face.

just my 2ct

happy training!




Posted on: 2005/1/19 20:13
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Re: Defense Vs. Offense in the Art
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Hi Chris,

i strongly suggest to read Davids post again, and think once more about. ´cause he is pointing at an important part of our art. To extend his advice into practial terms, you could change some of the kata e.g. 1.)leave away uke´s first attack or 2.) don´t be the one who is attacked as well as 3.)some "catch the bad guy" -stuff

For no. one you can choose nearly every kata you know. for 2.) i had some nice things learned by adapting takagi yoshin techniques 3.) Just try to get his balance, try to find out if striking is everytime the best way to do so.

In general i don´t think that a very agressiv strategie is the first choice, if your opponent is not a fool he´ll use your opening to defeat you. If he is not that good you can allow him to do the first step, maybe manipulted in way which was allready mentioned.

-> David if i took you wrong, i am sorry.

Burkhard

Posted on: 2004/12/29 4:52
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Re: So how many shihans do have 15th dan?
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Quote:

whether he does keep the top secrets of a Japanese art for the Japanese or not WE SHOULD ALL BE THANKFUL that we have the privaledge to train in his art. There is soo much that he has already given us...


good post! soory for abusing it

is there realy anyone who believes in the fairy tale of secret knowledge, hidden from "gaijin"-bujinkan-students"?
(Jon <- i don´t think you are one of the ´believers´!)

For what reason should one first open up his art art for(nearly)everyone and cut off some important details in a second step? This wouldn´t make any sense, as far as i see.
Maybe there are parts of our art which are not taught, but there are things that can´t be taught. E.g. have you ever been trying to teach experience, courage or the ability of being happy with any situation which comes up?

sorry for exaggerating the offtopic-tendeces,

a good and peaceful holiday season to everyone who is celebrating it!

Burkhard

Posted on: 2004/12/23 20:57
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Re: Gogyo
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Hi Jibran,

i believe the Sanshin No Kata and the Go-Gyo Kata to be the same thing. But this is mainly based on my listenings to Sveneric shihan at a seminar a couple of years ago.
And as you can see i am german so maybe i didn´t understood him correct, or it was only the same in connection with the stuff he taught there.
But i am quite sure because i never did anything unexpected when being asked to do go-gyo ( or the people where very polite )

so before you take me too serious, better wait a couple of days for correcting or additional comments by other villagers...

good luck with your studies

Burkhard

Posted on: 2004/9/29 17:16
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Re: How long before you can apply ninjutsu in real life?
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Just to put my 2c to the thread, I am not sure if the techniques we are learning are supossed to “work” in the way we train it. As far as I understood this art til this moment, my answer of the question “when one is able to do apply some tech. in a real situation” is NEVER, because while I am trying to DO a tech. in a real fight I´ll be beaten up ( my exp). If you are able to decide what tech. you want to do by your “normal” thinking just like “I´d like to take him down by using tome o nage (not sure about the spelling) you wasn´t in danger at all.
The techniques are like the latters in any language, you are in need to know them to be able to understand what an other wrote you, but they are just vehicles to transmit strategies and principles. Everyone of these latters is important, but some are more used than others.
Some things you´ll learn you can use without any timelack, other will take maybe 20 years.
You will know what I am talking about when you take the chance to see one of the senior instructures, they do not DO techniquies they just let them happen. (when they are teaching they DO tech. but to make things more obvious to the audience). I think it will be the small things you will be able to “apply” quite fast but the whole technique won´t work, but you´ll be able to respond on the problems/change of situation, esp. because you have exp. in MA at all, so you will maybe explore some benefits of some tech. I didn´t realized till now.
And to give a direct answer, I am learning this art for about ten years, with changing intesitity, feel quite comfortable I strange situatuions, but I still don´t like them. It took me about five years to reach this, but maybe I am a coward .
If you can manage to train five days a week guided by an instructor you see two times a week, you will be able to produce progress faster than me, so just do it and answer the question yourself, but let us know...

Don´t be surprised if a more expriencenced ones is about to correct me, but it is the way I see it this time…

Posted on: 2004/9/8 11:38
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