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Re: What "weapons/objects" to carry
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Some of the things I carry or keep in mind to make use of are below. All are everyday items that would raise no or little suspicion.

1. Car keys - You almost always have them on you. When I'm out in public on open dark streets I usually make sure I have them in my hand and concealed. I ground the group of keys into my palm to provide stability and extend the longest key behind my index finger, you wouldn't even notice I'm carry them. If something was to happen the index finger can be moved aside to reveal to longest key protruding between my index and middle finger, making for a good jabbing instrument with a closed fist.

2. An alternative I've thought of for keys is to get a replica of your longest key cut (usually your car key) but then sharpen the teeth on it to make them more knife-like. You could make it quite discreet without it looking like a blade but just giving them a slightly better cutting edge.

3. A beer bottle cap - very easy just to slip one in your pocket at all times. A good cutting instrument that can be easily concealed between your thumb and curled index finger.

4. One I'm not sure a lot of people are familiar with is an aluminium soda can. If you are carrying one, fold it in half and then tear it half. Only takes a second to do and gives you an incredibly sharp and terribly lethal cutting instrument. If it contains any liquid at the time of ripping that can be used at metsubishi.

5. In winter especially its easy to get away with carrying an umbrella with a hooked handle. If you buy a decent one the handle is usually is a nice solid piece of wood. Doubles as a hanbo.

5a An extension of the umbrella is the rip off the handle and sharpen the metal stump underneath. When attacked, the handle makes for a striking weapon in one hand, the umbrella makes for a stabbing weapon in the other.

6. Credit cards - obvious cutting instrument. Easy to sharpen the edge of one a bit more to make it cut more effectively.

7. Retractable key chains - you can get light metal chains that zip back up into the round cynlinder. With a bunch of keys on the end its an effective weapon. If you start to swing it the chain will extend under centrifical force, to be used as a striking weapon. You can also thrust it out towards their wrist, it'll wrap up around it and snare their wrist. The chain can also be used for strangling or tying up your attacker. Retractable Key Chains.

8. I've seen belt buckles that pull off easily to reveal a concealed blade, the blade obviously being held behind the leather.

9. I've always considered somehow modifying a watch to contain a concealed weapon of some type. Wouldn't be obvious at all and someone who have to know to look for it to find it, plus its something you can always have on you.

Anyway, just some of my thoughts.

Dean

PS. I find it a bit strange that so many people here concentrated on the ethical side of the conversation when Papa-san clearly pointed out the point of the post was not to discuss that.

Posted on: 2007/6/30 10:34
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Re: Pro-wrestling vs Ninpo
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Interestingly, I started a new job today and was on induction. Sitting next to me during induction was a rather large guy. During afternoon break we got talking and turns out he's a pro-wrestler in training (half way through his fourth year) and is doing the work as a way to supplement the costs of training. We got talking about what we both do (I kept it rather vague) but we both excited about our respective interest in different forms of combat. We left the conversation interested to talk more and he said he's show me some of the stuff he does. Sounds interesting from a learning perspective and a safe way to explore techniques and counters.

Posted on: 2007/6/25 19:13
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Re: Wrists seem to get beaten up in Ninjustu
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Tucker,

I'm relatively new to Bujinkan myself, having only been training now for several months, I do relate to your impressions. I think this partly comes from the perspective of being new to the art and seeing it with fresh eyes. What appears like a lot of wrist twisting is actually more movement of body balance. A person reacts to having their wrist twisted, which shifts their body position and balance that then allows the person to finish them off. Its a slight manipulation of a person's balance using their natural reflexes and response. Once you start training you'll come to understand this sense of bringing a person off balance through manipulation of joints and reactions. For example, thrusting your hand towards their face causes any normal person to shift their head back, which changes their body position and balance. You may not even make contact but that movement is enough for you to utilise and get them down. You use that natural reaction to your advantage.

Other people have mentioned it here as well, but pain is a good teaching in training. You come to understand how you yourself react to it, and how to continue if you experience it. You also then learn how to use pain against others to make them move. For example, you may be struggling to get a person to role over and attempting to use a lot of force and they could be resisting, but grab a pinky finger and pull it backwards and watch how fast they roll over. You only understand that though understanding your own reactions to that sort of pain and through training. As Darren and others have said though, pain and injury are different things. People generally train with pain but not injury and I've found in Bujinkan most people are sensible and caring to their partners because it promotes a good training experience. So don't worry, start out light and work you're way into it as you get use to the movements and levels of pain. Honestly, its a common fear in a lot of people but really isn't that big a deal. Start training, start out light and then work up the intensity as you gain more confidence and become more comfortable with what occurs in within training. You'll become more comfortable with this idea of pain.

There is a period of body adjustment that happens in your first few months of training and you'll find parts of your body and joints ache. Mostly I found its because I'm learning to move my body in new ways. Its a process of body re-adjustment. As your ligaments and muscle stretch and grow these pains go away. You'll come to know when something is a growing pain that will pass with time, more training and stretching and when its an injury pain. I think its a normal human function to know the difference. When its an injury pain see and doctor and rest the joint. Common sense really. I've had one or two periods where elbows or knee joints started to hurt more than normal, so I took a week break. It allowed them to heal stronger and better and I then continued on with training, and the pains haven't really come back.

Lastly, you mentioned that even now you get sharp pains in your wrist. Bujinkan training or not, I'd get this checked out by a doctor. Its good to know what's going on. You could have some kind of ligament or small bone problem or it could be simply a case that you need to stretch them out. Either way, get it looked at.

Besides all that, don't worry too much about pain. As I said, attend training, start out as light as you'll like and over time you'll become more comfortable with how the techniques work and how pain works, at which point you'll find you naturally start to train more intensively. Its a learning process really. Just relax and have fun at class, the rest will all fall into place.

Posted on: 2007/6/20 10:57
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Re: A nice account of wisdom
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Quote:

鬼 wrote:
I don't even know where to begin... But, I am confused how a simple story has lead to you pulling all this "stuff" out.

I am not saying you both haven't made good points, I just don't think the oasis story has all this extra stuff in it.

I think this might be a case of reading to much into a story, or a type of projection of what one was thinking about at the time, and doesn't have anything to do with the story at all.


Hmmm ... this is like offering someone an apple and asking them to bite it and then describe it. Someone will just say it tasted sweet or crunchy. But others will go on to say it made them feel refreshed, lighter, more energetic, happy or even alive. Just because others got more out of tasting the apple are they wrong for doing so? Is their interpretation of the apple more correct than anothers? Someone could easily turn around and say, 'but an apple doesn't have "energetic", "happy" and "alive" in it, its just citric juices etc.' Are they reading too much into it or are they just getting more out of the experience? The beauty of stories and metaphor is that they mean different things to different people and people can relate it to different experiences of their own lives. If people are able to gleen more out of a story and apply it in meaningful ways to their lives, isn't that a good thing?

I dare say where they are pulling this "stuff" from is their own experience of life, which is telling you about their psyche and the nature of man and mind in and of itself. How much of the apple one is prepared to chew will determine how much one gets out of this.

Now, consider for a moment that you are socrates charged with the puzzle by the oracle as being the wisest man, and this dialogue (this one right now) is your interview with the many craftsman, and politians of the town. What are you discovering about wisdom?

Go on ... take another bite!

Posted on: 2007/5/22 0:17
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Re: A nice account of wisdom
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DontPost wrote:
Come to mention it, not only is wisdom speculative, illusory and unmeasurable, it is also momentary. Perhaps the 'Oracle' was a complete idiot who 'hosted' wiseness for a moment.


I have to disagree here. Wisdom is not momentary. Wisdom comes from insight into that which is not momentary, into that which is beyond time and space, beyond form and beyond formlessness. If it is momentary then it is not wisdom!

What you seem to be describing is wisdom as perceived by an outsider, hence its ability to come and go and to be feigned for a moment. All this points to a transitory nature which would be the nature of the mind caught perceiving wisdom with an incorrect view of reality ... thus things appear transitory to this mind, and bound by time and space. Hence all that is viewed by this mind becomes imbued with its incorrect view of life. Thus wisdom and ones understanding of it becomes viewed/understood as such because it has nothing else to base its understanding on. Wisdom is quite literally beyond the realms of comprehension to this persons perception in their current mindset. Truly, how can one understand and perceive something that is beyond ones current capabilities? Its like trying to understand and describe what its like for a bird to fly when your a mouse who's never been off the ground. Your understanding of life and the laws that bind you are different.

To a wise person though wisdom is nothing more than their current experience, its nothing special. Its like asking you, what do you call your current experience? Well you don't call it anything, its just how you view the world. Its your experience of "being". A wise person is no different in this regard and thus don't label their experience as wise, its just their state of "being". Its just that their state of being is not bound by the same laws as someone who hasn't had the same insight. To someone external to them though they'll appear "wise" due to their nature, their way of being, how they are unaffected by the same things that trouble someone else. They aren't bound by space and time, forms and the comings and goings of things. This is because their mindset is viewing the world differently and understands a different set of laws. This view of life is manifested in the way they then carry themselves, respond to events and behave. Put simply, Wisdom is an embodiment of insight that is manifested in action, thus as a way of "being".

Anyway, hope that helps.

Posted on: 2007/5/20 14:38
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Re: Your "Most Memorable Weirdo"?
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Quote:

stormy wrote:
Years ago i had a guy write to me and asked if i could teach him some Ninja magic, i sent him back a blank sheet of paper!!!!!


Hey Normski,

What makes me laugh is that guy is probably still sitting around home trying to figure out how to read the paper!! ... holding up to flouro lights etc. haha!

Posted on: 2007/5/15 13:31
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Re: Plateaus in Training,
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Quote:

GekiRyu wrote:
Dean Crabb Thanks for the comments I will keep them in mind and thank you for your time too.


No worries mate. Writing about spiritual and life aspects is quite tough actually and it is a skill that takes time. I spent a few years writing nearly daily on a zen and meditation forum. I used to get slammed all the time and it taught me to be more precise in how I convey my ideas. It was interesting watching over time how my writing evolved and grew. Practice helps. So keep writing. Its a skill to be able to express your thoughts on paper, and you only get better by doing it more.

Quote:

I wont be bothering rewriting it or posting the like again, (on here at least!)


Hmmm, just cause you burn your hand on the stove doesn't mean you should now avoid the kitchen altogether. Lessons have scope. Burning your hand is saying "Careful, flame is hot". If you over expand the lesson due to emotional reaction you then limit future growth. Keep the lesson in the context in which it occurs, don't let the emotion cause cross-contextualisation - that is, the lesson gets applied (badly) to other areas in which it doesn't apply. Again, don't be afraid to walk into the kitchen again.

Quote:

My Thoughts:
Ok I waffled! I should have done What dean said! I understand now that you guys like to get to the point so in future Ill do that.


Yeah, I hope what I said helps. I find it helps me a lot. Waffling is actually caused by a couple things, in my opinion - not being clear about your purpose in writing it, not being clear in yourself about the topic you are discussing and not being clear in how to phrase the message (there are obviously could more). My question "what am I trying to say here?" I think hits at the heart of all of these. Sometimes you can write something and its good but if I find I get to the end of something and don't feel like I nailed it, I'll go back re-read it to myself and then ask "What am I trying to say here?" You'll then normally come out with a one to two sentence statement that summarises everything you just wrote. Then go and write exactly that and scrap the rest. In time you'll find you can do the one and two sentence thing first up. Lastly, its important to note that how you talk to someone about something is different to how you'd write in on paper. Verbal communication is quite different to written communication. Attempting to write verbally in a written form will also come across as waffle. Anyway, not trying to say I'm an expert, but somethings I picked up through years of writing myself. Hope it helps in your future writing endeavours. Keep up the practice.

There seems to have been one or two comments from people about your writing as if you are talking about the "nature of man" and knowing-all. I think that appearance in your writing may be due to tone and also not writing as if it is your opinion or experience of things. Learning to know the difference between what is common for all people and what is your experience may help you to phrase them differently. Generally unless you are an enlightened being with some authority and confidence that what you are saying IS the nature of man/existance, it is best to phrase it as if it is from your experience. People are more open to hearing someelse's experiences rather than have someone tell them how their existance is meant to be.

Quote:

As for My students they Respect me ....and I told them What I Wrote about them on here, and they all laughed because they know that it was a joke, I forgot there were Americans on here and British Humour is sometimes lost on you, (don't miss-quote me now!)


Actually I'm Aussie and prefer British humour.

Anyway, keep up the writing. Expressing your thoughts is a skill and you obviously enjoying expressing your thoughts and ideas. Don't let peoples feedback dampen that spirit. Just learn from it in the context for which it is given.

Posted on: 2007/5/12 21:01
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Re: Plateaus in Training,
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Hey Tervor,

Okay, I read through the whole thing. In relation to Bogg's statement, obviously Bogg's doesn't know you enough to judge you but that's not what he was saying to you. He gave his impression of how you appear through reading that article. That's different than claiming to know you. As a writer you need to be aware of what impression you are presenting. Bogg's statement I feel is fair.

Personally the article read okay, but I agree with Bogg's on that last point. Your final closing statement about your students being terrified of you is stupid. What value does that add to anything? It doesn't serve you or your article at all. This could be left out without any impact on your statement or message.

Quote:

GekiRyu wrote:
All I ask is that you get the gist of what I wrote and understand what I'm trying to say

Then why not say what you trying to say? This is an important lesson I learnt from someone about communication and writing. My impression is that your conclusion summed up the feeling I got through reading the rest of the article, you were trying to saying something but didn't really say it. You need to be more succinct in your message. Often when I write something like this, it pays to read a section and ask yourself "What am I trying to say here?" and then scrap the section and rewrite it. It appeared to me as if you spoke around topics without getting to the heart of it.

Anyway, I hope this feedback helps with your future writing attempts. Cheers.

Posted on: 2007/5/11 11:28
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Re: Methods and Tatics
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All artificial methods?
That leaves me wondering,
why call them a fool?


Posted on: 2007/5/2 8:36
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Re: Knowledge Big K
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Quote:

AYAM1 wrote:
Okay. You misunderstand me Dean. Maybe I didn't make myself clear enough. What I wanted to say is that knowledge(which I define as information) of Truth is substantiated through one's own testing or application of it in their own subjective sphere of experience.


Okay, then that is fine. As I state in my second paragraph from my last post "In this sense the individualised consciousness it used as a tool of examination to understand truth. But one should always be aware this is a mental and subjective investigation of Truth, and not Truth itself." If you forget this premise then you've fallen into the mental trap of the individualised consciousness. Substantiated though is a bad word to use. Even if you are substantiating "information/knowledge about Truth" then its really still just an opinion based on your individualised consciousness and thus not Truth itself, thus all you're really substantiating is your own thoughts about Truth. Again if you forget the premise I've stated, then the knowledge you've substantiated will be misguided. Its a very slippery trail.

Quote:
We all experience this one objective Truth through our subjective personal pov don't we?


NO! Point blank, flat out ... no! I'm not saying that to be harsh, I'm saying that to be direct. This is a very incorrect view and I really want you to get this point. If there is the experience of Truth then that is all there is. Its not experienced through our personal POV. Its only later that we then consider and think upon it from a personal POV. As soon as you are viewing subjectively you've lost it. Re-read your own sentence here again, does it even make sense? How can one view The "Objective Truth" subjectively anyway? Once you are viewing subjectively you are really only viewing a memory of Truth, then its becomes a individualised experience. If you forget this then you're in all sorts of trouble.

Quote:
How else do we know it? Of course Truth simply is and doesn't need substantiating. Your second paragraph I agree with. You haven't clarified anything for me. You've just made assumptions about how I think that are erroneous. This could be my fault for not expressing myself perfectly.


Yes, I don't think you are expressing yourself very well but that leads me to wonder why. Its like koans I discussed earlier in this thread, a students answers give you some idea of their development. Knowledge and information about truth is the same. How a person expresses their ideas about Truth reflects their insight to truth. I am concerned about how you express yourself sometimes, to be perfectly honest, which leads me to think you may be misleading yourself. I can only implore you to re-question some of these statements (like the one above) that you hold as truth.

Maybe it would be worth your while to consider the question "Can Truth be experienced without the subjective personal POV, without individualised consciousness?" But don't then examine this question with your current state-of-mind, as you'll quickly answer no. The answer to this question is actually "YES!" but to substantiate it you have to go and and experience it and that probably won't be possible with your current state-of-mind. That then begs the question, how can this be experienced? If you follow that trail you'll evetually find the Truth we speak of. Good luck!

Posted on: 2007/5/1 16:40
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