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Re: Dojo websites
Kutaki Postmaster
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2003/4/14 13:45
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Quote:

bufuikan wrote:
Please consider about what you write online and what type of impact it will make.


This advice also goes to what people write on their websites. If I put crap up on my site, people should call me out on it.

Quote:
It is bad when people speak ill of those who are considered as seniors. Please consider the type of example you are setting for your peers and others.


I've known Phil for over 20 years, so I'm not saying anything online I wouldn't say personally.

Quote:
You don't have to like someone or train with them but you do have to respect the fact that they represent the Bujinkan and Soke.


If I believe that someone is misrepresenting their intentions (and I don't think the Onibujin people are doing it purposefully), then they are doing a poor job of representing the Bujinkan and Soke, whether they are senior or not. If I write that my website is "the official website for NYC training," everybody would be perfectly within their rights to call me out on it.

Many people have personal conversations with Soke or the shihan that they believe gives them EXCLUSIVE license to do things. I've yet to see any of those beliefs actually pan out.

I know there are other directories that require shidoshikai membership cards in order to be listed, that claim direction from such-and-such shihan, etc. When an actual Hombu administrator comes on and says, "Soke says this directory is the official directory of the Bujinkan," then I'll believe it. From a ninpo perspective, treating every rumor as gospel because it comes from a senior person is not very smart. How we choose to deal with these issues is an individual matter.

Posted on: 2009/3/2 13:01
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Jeff Christian
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Re: Dojo websites
Kutaki Postmaster
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I agree with Warren. With all due respect to Phil and whoever else is behind Onibujin, calling the site "the official network" is crap.

Posted on: 2009/2/25 12:08
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Jeff Christian
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Re: Over Confidence
Kutaki Postmaster
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Random thoughts.

1. While the idea of taking responsibility as a teacher for a "student who dies because of my faulty instruction" sounds laudable, I think it's a blanket statement that pre-supposes that the instructor was faulty in the teaching, rather than the student misunderstanding, misapplying, or simply being contextually unable to do as taught -- any of which are not the teacher's responsibility. If a student dies, I think it can be very difficult to know where to lay the blame.

2. Confidence is not like temperature, where you can set it to an objective level and know that's where it belongs. You adjust your confidence as circumstances change, in the same way that you adjust your evaluation of whether you're "hot" or "cold" according to what you're doing (sprinting vs. cooling down). The temperature hasn't changed, but your evaluation of how the temperature feels to you has changed.

Similarly, in a fight where the participants haven't changed, your feeling about the circumstances change as the fight progresses. Training and experience can place our confidence levels at closer to appropriate levels, but if your opponent turns out to be weaker than you expected, you'll change course in the fight (because you feel more confident) differently than if your opponent turns out to be stronger (and now you feel less confident) than you expected. This is true regardless of whether it's one-on-one or one army versus another.

3. Deception in appearing over-confident or under-confident is surely a standard part of kyojitsu. Our ability to not only manipulate our own confidence levels but to manipulate our opponent's perception of our confidence can be seen in the sanshin and kihon.

That's my ramblings. Interesting discussion.

Posted on: 2009/2/8 11:30
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Jeff Christian
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Re: Three points of contact
Kutaki Postmaster
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Quote:

侶武 wrote:
Frankly, I think it might just be a language issue that is separating most of the talk.


I agree. Otherwise there's a lot of talking around a subject without being able to actually talk about it. Arguably, most of it is best talked about in person anyway, but that doesn't stop us from trying.

Posted on: 2009/1/30 20:42
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Jeff Christian
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Re: Three points of contact
Kutaki Postmaster
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Quote:

Tengu6 wrote:
[quote]I think we all agree that you should only have as many points of contact as are necessary.


And there's the rub. How do you decide "how many" and "which one(s)" at any given point in time? Is the answer an absolute, a subjective, contextual, or variable? Or can it be answered at all? The study of these factors, I think, lead to interesting answers.

Posted on: 2009/1/30 13:16
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Jeff Christian
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Re: Three points of contact
Kutaki Postmaster
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Quote:

侶武 wrote:

It depends on what you mean by stable , I think.


Exactly. My imprecise vocabulary is muddling things, I'm afraid.

Trying to throw a 20 pound weight with two hands is much easier than trying to use one hand to throw a 20 pound balloon waving around in the wind. But if you could hold that balloon in place (make it more stable), then you can exercise more control over it (toss it, compress it, etc.).

On the other hand, it takes less energy to redirect a ball in midair than it does to pick up a ball and throw it where you want it to go. Using kuzushi (via 3+ points of contact, perhaps) so that they're stable (under your control) so that an appropriate technique can follow (perhaps using multiple points of control, perhaps less).

Ganseki nage: multiple points of control to create kuzushi. While uke is in state of imbalance, fewer points of control are necessary in order to create the throw. But the trick is that the uke must be stable (under your control) in that transition, otherwise they'll escape or take ukemi.

As I write this I see I'm doing an awful job of expressing myself, but that's hardly a first...

Posted on: 2009/1/30 11:21
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Jeff Christian
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Re: Three points of contact
Kutaki Postmaster
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Movement can be viewed as a compromise between stability and mobility. Lying flat on my back on the ground with limbs spread out gives me maximum stability, minimal mobility. Being in midair gives minimal stability, maximal mobility (control over that mobility is a different matter).

3 points of control makes the uke more stable and less mobile compared to only 1 point of control. This interplay between creating stability and mobility in the uke -- or the illusions of these dynamics -- is an important part of studying both kata and organic movement, I think.

Posted on: 2009/1/30 4:07
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Jeff Christian
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Re: Dojo in New York City area
Kutaki Postmaster
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Quote:

GSinger wrote:

Does anyone here know anything about the Tanuki Dojo? I found their business card in one of Masaaki Hatsumi's books in Barnes and Noble. They are relatively far from me but from their website they seem pretty well connected with Japan.



Someone put their dojo's business cards in Soke's books at Barnes and Noble? That's ballsy. And not in a good way.

Posted on: 2008/12/17 2:26
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Jeff Christian
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Re: Dojo in New York City area
Kutaki Postmaster
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There's not so many choices in the outer boroughs, unfortunately. We're in Manhattan, along with Mark Guest, Josh Polier, Anthony Lucas, and Orin Paliwoda. Josh also has some classes in Brooklyn Heights, I think. Not sure if Oliver Martin is still teaching in Manhattan, since his site is down.

Joe Maurantonio is in Bronxville, if that's more convenient for you. I think Warren Young is near there also, although I admit I'm clueless about anything north of the Harlem River.

Where are you at and what are you looking for in training? That might help you narrow down your search a bit.

Posted on: 2008/12/5 2:03
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Jeff Christian
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Re: Dojo in New York City area
Kutaki Postmaster
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It's a good idea to try out different places and find a teacher that you mesh with. Feel free to stop by our dojo anytime. You're right, you've got lots of choices in NYC!

Posted on: 2008/12/2 13:44
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Jeff Christian
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