Login
Username:

Password:

Remember me



Lost Password?

Register now!
Socialize
 

Recent Topics
   All Posts (okami_greywulf)




Re: Kuki swordwork
Just Passing Through
Joined:
2007/12/14 11:52
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 4
Offline
I've done armored fighting for many years,even before I started in the bujinkan, although age and surgeries have taken away that pastime
I've also done medieval style fighting against both a (good) kenjutsuka and a kendoka who competes nationally. Depending on the type of weapon there is little difference with the exception of weapon and shield. There is usually a lot of iaiuchi, but most traditional Japanese weapons stylist have one hell of a time trying to deal with a shield man of any competence. Yari and lance have very few meaningful differences, and single sabre against katana is a wash. It did get interesting with a foil or rapier vs katana, as both are speed dependent, but one is a thuster the other a slasher, but both with secondary capability of the other weapon.
I think that European medieval weapons styles have been give short shrift and that the practice of this kind of armored fighting has a lot of training potential for Japanese weapons stylists. If nothing else it is one heck of a lot of fun.
Your mileage may vary.
Wild Bill

Posted on: 2007/12/17 1:50
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: 9 ryu question
Just Passing Through
Joined:
2007/12/14 11:52
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 4
Offline
I wonder if we today are trying to lump together many distinct classes or groups that were different in different time periods. After all, if you read Takematsu sensei's biography, it mentions several times how much upheaval and change there was during his lifetime alone. I am sure that the exact definition of a "ninja", their job description and who was actually one of their number varied considerable over the historical period we are lumping into one definition.
For example, every daimyo was obliged to keep and maintain a system of spies and informers who fed information to him that was essential to his survival and that of his family. I think that in many cases these same spies and informers sold information to more than one master, too.
Would all of them be considered "ninja"? How about the youngest sons of various lords, who were often placed in religious orders and who acted as very effective spies in that capacity?
I've read that the majority of persons we today would consider ninja were actually samurai doing specific assignments, not a member of a "ninja clan" dedicating their lives to a secret ninpo ryuha. Intuitively, this makes sense to me, and I think that in most cases, what we call a ninja today is actually a construct of persona from several different places and time periods.
A good example of this is the Roman Catholic ex-saint Christopher. Supposedly this saint turned out to be a construct of the lives of several different holy men and monks, not a specific individual.
Your thoughts?
Wild Bill

Posted on: 2007/12/17 1:23
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Ryu and weapons
Just Passing Through
Joined:
2007/12/14 11:52
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 4
Offline
The problem here is that there are several lists floating around that are all different and there does not seem to be any clear definitive list extant.
I would also assume that each ryu has changed during different time periods due to the types of weapons and combat that was common at that time. In Takagi Yoshin ryu, for instance, the tessen (iron fan), tanto and jutte (truncheon) as well as the short naginata (4-5foot vs 7 foot battlefield nag) were supposed to be the weapons of choice, or so we were told during the year Hontai Takagi Yoshin ryu was taught last time. Not sure when that was, but I think the taikai in the US was one of Bud Malmstroms Atlanta Taikai. Tim Brathurst did a couple of really nice videos that year from seminars he did in the US.
However, I remember the old Togakure Quest video where Mrs Hatsumi is shown using the short naginata as part of kunoichi training. I wonder if this will be clarified in Soke's new book?
Thanks
Wild Bill

Posted on: 2007/12/17 1:06
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Haho Keri
Just Passing Through
Joined:
2007/12/14 11:52
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 4
Offline
I think it would indeed be happo keri, which literally means 8 way cutting, or at least that is what I've been told by japanese speakers.
Wild Bill J

Posted on: 2007/12/17 0:50
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer



 Top




Today's Sponsor