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Re: Clearing the boards
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Once upon a time, a moderator deleted a thread after I gave him some undue and complimentary credit. Can someone in that position please delete the completely irrelevant posts? You know the ones!

Posted on: 2015/4/9 2:18
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Re: The Most Direct Path
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Getting back to the original topic...

Duncan, I agree with you wholeheartedly on a social level. What you’ve laid out is a situation where someone healthy is able to pursue martial arts training. This could be the situation in any martial art from what you’ve laid out and from my experience, this framework is usually what is followed by people who show up at the dojo.

On a practical, skill-building level, the training methods you’ve described are not the most effective IMHO. Simple repetitive basic movement is not enough. Difficult to manage without someone to train with but we’re all part of a dojo. And I’m playing on your all else being equal situation :)

Solo practice and with beginners calls for Static training. That is individual, specific movement, that can be done repetitively. Ukemi, Uke Nagashi, Tsuki, Sanshin, kyuho uchi/giri, etc. This is where someone can practice their role in a technique and polish that to make it efficient and natural.

That will get to a point where timing and placement are screaming for attention and a need for interactive training comes up. Fluid training, as I’ve seen it described, finds it way into what are commonly called drills. Think Ura Gyaku and transitioning to Omote Gyaku when that’s done so Tori can find out what it feels to disrupt balance and Uke can find out and feel what it’s like to be forced to move. We can also think of two people practicing Sanshin back and forth to find the distance and the flow.

In order to reach another level of integration, we need to do more controlled “stress-test” training. It’s much more Dynamic and the need for a third-party to act as referee or judge is key to prevent injury. This is when, under pressure, a budoka can really get a feeling for timing and distance. At that point, practicing this way, someone can look at their technique and know whether or not they can say, "So Far So Good".

All three of these have their benefits and shortfalls if done out of balance with the others. These are not specific to an art but really any interactive physical activity. Soke’s classes reflect this and often the third type of training is introduced for multiple opponents scenarios. It seems that his art is not subject to basics-only.

If this reads familiar, I think Rory Miller also has a PPCT instructors’ manual. It’s basics sports practice.

Please keep writing your blog. It’s a good read :)

Posted on: 2011/6/5 4:52
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Re: An article with solid advice across arts
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refreshing to be on a topic that doesn't involve "saving" the bujinkan. Been busy. Will reply in more detail soon when time allows. Good conversation.

This is a good topic. We're at a time when it is more important to explain in rationalized detail why we do things the way we do. Soke is and has been very good in this regard.


Posted on: 2010/10/30 15:44
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Re: An article with solid advice across arts
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Quote:

That wasn't the point of the article. To put it in perspective say you go to the hombu and train with one of the shihan and some random 15th dan, not the teacher of the class, walks around the class giving advice willy nilly. Should the 15th dan dispense advice in the presence of that teacher?

And similarly say you have a visiting budoka and he gives advice to your students about how to do certain techniques. Ought he do that, given you are the teacher?


Posted on: 10/21 5:23




Rob,
You're changing your argument. What started as a comment about dojo training in general has now become a venting session about foreigners who visit and dole out advice like its their birthright and responsibility. Nobody likes when those guys do that. Those guys don't like when other guys do it to them, either.

Really, you've never been solicited advice from a Japanese national? I don't believe that. It happens. It especially happens to women. It may be a result of Soke leaving room for foreigners to do it. It may be another reason. The article leads me to believe that this is more of a common annoyance for all martial arts schools in general.


Quote:

RJHIII wrote:
Jim,

I would agree there might be times when certain people out to give unsolicited advice, however I'd like to keep that number down to 5-6 people total, i.e. Hatsumi sensei and the menkyo kaiden holders.

We have a slight problem if we allow more than that, what qualifies a person to be highly experienced. Would RVD count? Also, what is dangerous to someone that can do it? For example, a juggler of chainsaws juggling chainsaws ins't all that dangerous, but to someone who can't juggle them it may be.







So that we don't get careless and go dangerously off course, I'll respond to the question involving the analogy. That game's fun. The straw man and the ad hominem you can keep. You know better than that.

I should have qualified experience to say "outside experience". It was implied but not explained well enough. My bad. Under your analogy, it would fit if the juggling "lesson of the day" at the Rob the Magnificent's (sorry I couldn't resist :) ) juggling school was specifically on fitting chainsaws into the act. Jim No Thumbs, an ex-logger who is new to the school, arrives a little late but just in time to see some cool skills but hear some bad advice about chainsaws he once received just prior to obtaining his current moniker. There are senior students at the school who have studied there for years. Everyone holds them in high regard, looks to them for advice and sometimes for lessons outside of the normal class time. Each of the class seniors swears up and down that they are all seeing this for the first time. It's coming their turn to start picking up chainsaws.

Given his years of experience in his previous career that had him carrying, using, and practicing chainsaw safety (most of the time ;) ) ought Jim No Thumbs mention his concern to the instructor of the class?

I believe so.


-Jim

This is a good topic. Thanks for bringing it up.

Posted on: 2010/10/26 13:22
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Re: An article with solid advice across arts
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If a high-ranking, or highly-experienced individual shows up at the dojo and sees the instructor teaching something wreckless, careless, or dangerous, that individual has a responsibility to bring it up with the instructor. Dojo and organization be damned.

It isn't an ego trip. It's compassion toward everyone else in the room.

If someone is going to put themself out there and take the position as an instructor in this art, the responsibility is always there to provide the best method and practices available. It isn't a challenge to the instructor's ability to politely question or raise concerns. It could be the first time they've heard that point. It could be a simple oversight. It could be a challenge (real) to see who is paying attention, been training somewhere when that happened. It's irresponsible though to visit another dojo and correct the students there without knowing their curriculum. In two hours, you might only get a snapshot of a month-long lesson that incorporates factors you hadn't planned for.

No problem raising questions to my training partner. That two-way dialogue is important. I'm hesitant to raise points to a class where I am only visiting. Especially if they have different teachers than me. There are a lot of bad teachers out there, but there are also a few good ones whose method of transmission is just fine.

Mostly in agreement,

Jim

Posted on: 2010/10/25 6:10
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Re: Swordwork
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Back to Joel’s original post. The three main differences I see in training between using fukuro and bokken are edge, weight, and friction on contact.

The first two have already been discussed here but the third hasn’t really been emphasized. If you are doing swordwork that absolutely never involves clashing swords, using bokken isn’t that big of a deal. Why not just use steel? Since we tend toward clashing (Kukishin kata Kiri Sage comes to mind) and catching (insert kata name here), using fukuro gives an unrealistic feel. What may seem like a good trick with a fukuro shinai is often shown to be particularly stupid with a bokken. There’s too much friction with fukuro.

When at the dojo or at a seminar, I’m usually glad to have a training partner who uses fukuro shinai. Information overload is not conducive to proper control. By day two of learning something new, zombie-mode sets in if there’s already been hard training and lots of pace changes. While “that guy” tends to be the newbie, if we’re training, we’re using softies.

-Jim

Posted on: 2009/3/8 0:44
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Re: SPECIAL OFFER! NINJUTSU TEACHERS TRAINING COURSE.
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Interesting. Nice page layout. Um... hooray for gassho?

Posted on: 2009/3/7 1:26
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Re: Importance of Dojo members
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I like this post Rob, but more from the perspective of the importance of getting your shiRt together before you get to the dojo. The article summed up in this line:
"Our study reveals the ongoing support of friends and family to be one of the most important factors influencing sports performance”.

In other words, if your life sucks, your skill probably sucks, too.

I come from a dojo where those who are self-reliant tend to receive the most support. Those who accept the loneliness of diligence tend to have the most friends. I’ve seen others come and go who seem to have an entitlement sense that increases with their arrival at the dojo. As if appearing in the room were enough dues to pay or to grant some-dan ranking. These types usually feel the most left out and then quit or chase some other ego-boosting pursuit.

I’d personally like to see more personal responsibility taken for poor skill, more acceptance of good criticism, and more openness to sharing with those who are willing to take pains to improve. But the latter is already here for the most part and is one of my favourite reasons for training with Bujinkan people.

Rambly yours,

Jim

Posted on: 2009/3/7 1:23
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Re: Can Budo gain any advantages from "sport"?
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There are multiple sport-options for someone looking to minimize their injuries. Among these options, focused exercises (the sports themselves) that can help with overall wellbeing.

It’s a vague response but if we’ve only got this question to go on this discussion, then we can find in the athlete’s experience any meaning we’re looking to find. Reading through your posts, what you’ve presented Ed is a challenge to budo-practitioners with an understanding of Kinesiology and Sports Psychology.

Anyone here qualified or knowledgeable enough to take him up on that?


Jim Shore

Posted on: 2008/6/18 4:15
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post-seminar: .Rob Renner
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Just want to thank everyone who attended this last weekend's seminar with Rob Renner. It was great training for those who made it out and good to see the improvement in movement from the beginning to the end. The theme was Structure and Tension, and Kieru ("disappearing"). Rob gave examples of drills and exercises for improving flexibility and range of motion, controlling distance, controlling your opponent, and many more!

For those who have never met or trained with Rob, he uses his kinesiology background and experience in martial arts to explain in simple terms what Hatsumi sensei teaches in his classes. If you get the chance to train with him, you will likely find that what he teaches enables you to perform techniques previously taught to you but difficult to apply. And training with him is fun.

Hope to see you at the next one,

Jim

Posted on: 2008/4/8 17:58
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