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Re: Black Belt 1966 / 67
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Quote:

mrdunsky wrote:
Who is Andy Adams? Did or does he train with the bujinkan? It is not a name I am familar with.

Marty


He was just a freelance journalist. Looking through old Black Belt it seems he was a major contributor back then. Even when I was living in Japan in the first half of the ‘90s he was still reporting on sumo.

I am quite interested in the timeline of the early Bujinkan and the first foreign students.

Going by my research the first person to have been involved would have been Charles Gruzanski in the late 1950’s early 1960’s. Both Gruzanski and soke were students of Yumio Nawa-sensei prior to Hatsumi-sensei training with Takamatsu-sensei. It seems their friendship and shared interest in Ninjutsu extended to Hatsumi-sensei opening his own school although I don’t know if Mr Gruzanski ever trained with Hatsumi-sensei.

In May 1961 an article “The Art of Invisibility” was published in Argosy magazine. I received a copy from Charles Gruzanski’s son. It was “photographed by” Ray Falk – I’m not sure if he also wrote the article, if Mr Gruzanski wrote it or it was done by a staff writer. Some of the photo’s were reproduced for the book “Spike and Chain”

In the article it says Hatsumi-sensei has about twelve students and teaches twice a week.

Doron Navon is supposed to have started around 1963. He was one of the first resident students at the Kodokan. I’m not sure if he was first or Terry Dobson was but I believe they both were training about this time.

In 1966 Danny Waxman and Quintin Chambers started training. Hatsumi-sensei told me Quintin Chambers was his only ever uchi-deshi (although Mr Chambers says he wasn’t living at soke’s house but would stay there the night after training and catch the early train to Tokyo in the morning). He trained for about seven years before returning to Hawaii.

From my understanding the budoka ex-pat community was quite strong then. Donn Dreager, Doron Navon, Danny Waxman, Quintin Chambers plus guys like Arthur Tansley and Andrew Adams all knew each other very well.

I think the interest from martial arts journalists, researchers and photographers such as Donn Dreager, Andrew Adams and Arthur Tansley in 1966 plus a couple of new foreign students starting reflects this.

Posted on: 2010/1/12 22:55
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Black Belt 1966 / 67
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Posted on: 2010/1/12 12:08
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Re: Takagi Yoshin Ryu
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Since Takamatsu-sensei brought it together as one thing it would be pretty hard to find differences that aren't just henka of what we do anyway.

Maybe compare to other branches for similarities and difference such as the Hontai Yoshin Ryu

[youtube=425,350][/youtube]

Or the Takagi Ryu
Youtube - Takagi Ryu Jujutsu

Posted on: 2010/1/3 17:05
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Re: 2010: Rokkon Shojo
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Quote:

dseago wrote:
"Rock On" what?



"Rock on Shoujo"

_MSC_CLICK_TO_OPEN_IMAGE

Posted on: 2009/12/23 21:56
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Re: The topic of resistance
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I agree with Shawn.

The shihan in one dojo in Japan prescribes resistance for normal technique / kata training at 20%. If you just flop about and jump into throws then it is probably not enough, if you are pulling back, fighting back then it is too much.

Posted on: 2009/12/15 12:04
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Re: The unspoken contract
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Quote:

Tessen wrote:
Duncan,

were you referring to me? Thanks for not curb stomping me. We're training Budo, right?

The intensity of the training for me comes when I learning how something. My interest is in taiju ido, kamae, kihon, shisei, mawai, kankaku. Tairyoku not kinniku.

The fact that you could drop your knee in my chest and crush me is interesting to neither party. Nobody learns anything new that way.

Nobody is claiming that I'm particularly skilled and my only claim is that I've improved since...before (-: I just train.

I talked to one of the Vampires who is now in Europe. Best of luck to him and his family!


A good post Liz ... and yes I was referring to you.

I like training with you, not just because you are such a nice person, but as I do with small people with very good ukemi. I remember George laughing at me at the hombu for one day training with Hosoda-sensei and the next session with Shiraishi-sensei, but I get a lot from training with smaller budoka. I have to drop the intensity and work with greater precision and more economical / tighter movements. It's like moving from bridge building to watch making. The precision increases the intensity in a different way for me.

Of course a smaller person can gain a lot from moving large people around, they have to be accurate in their movement and hit the right spots in terms or distance and balance or the big guy isn't moving.

Quote:

Tessen wrote:
We're training Budo, right?


Exactly, as I said I enjoy training with you and get benefit from it ... maybe you get something out of pushing me around. This is an experience of budo that isn't (as) possible in kakutogi.

My point is adjustments in intensity are (I think) not only based on different levels of ability and certainly not based on rank .... I think there is much to be said in putting yourself into situations where you have to readjust your intensity and refocus it differently.

Quote:

Tessen wrote:
Nobody is claiming that I'm particularly skilled and my only claim is that I've improved since...before (-: I just train.


I only see you once a year so I see improvements in bigger increments. I think you're doing pretty well.

Posted on: 2009/12/10 22:08
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Re: The unspoken contract
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Quote:

jwills79 wrote:
Just like the last thread you simply avoid all my questions being asked of you then change the subject. Care to answer my questions first?


If you insist.

Quote:

jwills79 wrote:
How many of those same Shihan do you believe would have preferred to have the mediocre skills displayed by so many in the Bujinkan?


The question is too loaded. I don’t know

Quote:

jwills79 wrote:
Do you think they would not have trained that way or just been better prepared for it?


I don’t know without guessing other people’s opinions.

Quote:

jwills79 wrote:
Do you think Hatsumi sensei would have preferred Takamatsu sensei go easy on him looking back on it?


I have only seen the training on the Takamatsu-sensei DVD. I don’t know how hard the training was or if Hatsumi-sensei’s view of the intensity (without guessing).

Quote:

jwills79 wrote:
If your answer is 'Yes' to the questions in the first section then why do you train in other martial sports hoping to improve your skills?


I train in other martial sports because I enjoy it.

Quote:

jwills79 wrote:
When you are faced with that kind of opponent do you just quit your judo tournament?


No

Quote:

jwills79 wrote:
If it is serious then shouldn't the training be serious as well?


Yes

Quote:

jwills79 wrote:
Quote:
BujinkanBrisbane wrote:

I don't train in kakutogi to "improve my skills". I do it because I enjoy it a lot.


Really?? That is the only reason. So you don`t mind if I was to quote you from a previous thread where you say that you train in other martial sports for more than the simple enjoyment?


Yes it is the only reason. I don’t remember posting differently before but I may have. My reason for training in the Bujinkan is also because I enjoy it very much for some similar reasons and some different.

Posted on: 2009/12/10 14:51
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Re: The unspoken contract
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jhealy wrote:
I think there are good points on both sides. It's true that we're not practicing ballet and that the senior Japanese Shihan trained quite hard with Hatsumi-sensei in the beginning but there are a few things that I think should be considered:

1. The Japanese Shihans' movement being what it is doesn't neccessarily correlate with how hard they were thrown and hit. It might have more to do with constant and intimate exposure to and focused attention from someone as skilled as Hastumi-sensei.

2. There are plenty of people who trained hard in the past who are no longer training because of the resulting damage.

3. Just because someone is senior to someone else doesn't mean they're skilled enough, aware enough or sensitive enough to inflict unexpected pain in a safe way. I can't even count the number of green belts I've overheard talking like masters to more junior green belts. Same goes for black belts. Our art seems to allow (if not breed) delusion, which makes unilateral decisions on training intensity dangerous.

4. An "I'll decide how much pain you experience" attitude might be appropriate to a master/disciple relationship, but there are very few if any real masters below the Japanese Shihan, and students (especially paying students) are not disciples. A teacher/student relationship is very different from a master/disciple relationship.

I'm not saying there shouldn't be any pain during training, only that I agree with Ed in that I think it should all be agreed upon ahead of time and that it's the more senior person's duty to care for the safety of the more junior person.


Some good points here.

I think it’s also important to differentiate hard and/or intense training for injurious training. The level of ability in performing technique by tori and the level of ukemi by uke will dictate the safe intensity in my opinion. Unless you increase in skill then training fast and hard with bad technique and bad ukemi will only cause injuries that hold up your training.

There are other factors. Someone starting training at 16 will be able to start from a level of intensity different to that of someone starting at 45. In my home dojo in Japan if I’m training with Liz (of whom I’m probably more than twice the size of) I won’t be picking her up and slamming her down with a big throw then dropping the knee on her – I’ll tone it down a bit. Then if I change partners to one of the Vampire brothers I can lift the intensity of training to a level which is difficult with most partners.

At the Hombu if I’m training with someone I’ve met for the first time I will (at least start) at a lower intensity. If I’m training with Yabunaka-san the intensity will be back to what is was when we used to train years ago.

As Seno-sensei said, there are a lot of people at level one who are trying to train at level ten. First you have to go through levels 2 to 9 to get to 10.

Posted on: 2009/12/10 12:01
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Re: The unspoken contract
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I am also training at the University of Queensland Judo Club and Garra BJJ club.

Quote:

I personally don’t want to train with someone who looks like they are going to injure me.


This statement still applies .... I really really don't want to train with someone who looks like they are going to injure me. The most likely candidates have white belts around their waists.

Quote:

jwills79 wrote:
why do you train in other martial sports hoping to improve your skills?


I don't train in kakutogi to "improve my skills". I do it because I enjoy it a lot.

Quote:

jwills79 wrote:
You can get hurt doing those as well.


I can get hurt driving my car to training. I can minimise the risk of both by taking care.

Anyway I have felt more in danger of being injured in Taijutsu or even Aikido than in Judo, BJJ, boxing or MMA.

Quote:

jwills79 wrote:
When you are faced with that kind of opponent do you just quit your judo tournament? I would hate to see your record in tournament competition.


The stress of competition is huge but I don't feel in danger of injury. At the same time in competition or randori I tap if I'm in an armlock, I don't block ippon throws by landing on my head or extending my arm out in front against seioi-nage etc - I'm a club and veteran player so I'm happy to take a fall for a good ippon rather than try to land on my head as if I'm fighting for the Olympic gold medal.

My competition record is improving - my last comp was four wins and two losses (both losses against the same guy). My best result to date was taking gold in the Australian Masters Games in the 30 - 39 group.

What's your competition record?

Who do you train with again?

Posted on: 2009/12/9 21:42
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Re: Looking for 2008 daikomyosai DVD
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Posted on: 2009/12/9 20:57
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