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Re: Christianity and Bujinkan?
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I guess that whether BJK is compatible to your own religion depends on which religion this is, what 'subsect' you belong to and how you view your religion. The BJK is of course a modern construction that maybe surpasses religion, or has not much to do with it. However, I think you have to be honest to yourself that Koryu are rooted in ancient Japan and usually have strong ties to either Mykkyo Buddhism or Shintoism, both of which have much point that are frowned upon by many who follow the Judeo-Christian religions. These being, among others, the veneration of different Gods, the use of certain practices that could be seen as magic, etc. Mind you, in my opinion, Catholicism has similar practices. Protestantism is another cup of tea of course.
So while the BJK may not be religious, the nine schools are. Especially Kukishin Ryu can not be separated from the Amatsu Tatara practices, which are Shinto.
This is in my opinion by no means an issue, yet when practicing these schools you have to see them for what they are, and they are tied to a religion that is not western. Which to me is no problem at all, yet this is for everyone to decide for themselves. I know a teacher who started his own substyle of 'ninjitsu' because he is strictly protestant and was not comfortable with these things. To each his own.

Regards,

Tom.

Posted on: 2012/1/28 20:31
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Re: Bujinkan Budô Training Manual ???
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Yesplease!

The writer's of the manuals do not seem to profess that you can learn from it. It is not like RVD's home study crap. What would be wrong with having a reference at hand for personal training to follow up what you learn in the dojo. Unless, as Skugvarg implies, there are mistakes in them. Which one would of course see when one had learned the kata in the dojo.
So who has these books and what do you think of them?

Regards, Tom.

Posted on: 2011/3/20 2:05
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Re: Is it true? If so, the Bufu is not as strong a wind as before...
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My thoughts exactly...

Posted on: 2010/10/27 20:42
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Re: Read Kacem's New Book(Very disappointing!) Proof wa?
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I see where you're coming from, and scientifically speaking there is a problem of how things can be verified. Yet calling it blind faith would in my opinion be a bit far fetched. In works like these, so history/journalism on closed societies, the author for instance often brings up interviews with anomymous people, or people only he/she has access to. Now in this case, it concern documents that at least exist, many people asides from Mr. Zoughari have seen them. The only thing is that he was one of the very few that has gotten the privilige, for that's what it is, to research them. No the here we would have, as I said before, to trust Mr Zoughari's professional skill and integrity. He has never done anything that would make one think that these two are not of high standards, in fact, most of his published work on Budo and Bujutsu is very knoledgeable and accurate.
So 100 percent scientific proof? No. But blind faith? Also no. Somewhere in between and as far as I am concerned closer to proof. Please remember what I have said before that proof in the historical sciences is something that is not as strict and conclusive as it is in the natural sciences. Furthermore, as I have said before, Mr. Zoughari hase never before caused his judgement to be drawn into question so why should this be done now that he has decided to tackle a difficult subject. He could have stuck to the safer 'regular' bujutsu.

Regards.

Posted on: 2010/7/10 17:21
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Re: Read Kacem's New Book(Very disappointing!) Proof wa?
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I totally agree with Skuggvargs last lines. The thing really is that this is not a simple subject which is easy to study. Earlier I compared it to researching the Yakuza or the Freemasons. Indeed we should be happy that someone who is very vested in the subject matter and who has access to the source is giving out information.

Regards.

Posted on: 2010/7/7 18:29
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Re: Read Kacem's New Book(Very disappointing!) Proof wa?
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Skuggvarg,

I tried this one, stating that in this kind of research, where the object of research is a closed group or society, that we have to trust the judgement and opinion of the researcher who gains entry, usually after much hard work. Not much response on that actually. I do believe that some of the evidence presented by Mr. Zoughari dates the schools to at least before Takamatsu, and then there comes the point where we would have to believe is skill and sincerety. And why would a man like him jeopardize his whole career to tell bogus stories or by not researching things correctly? If he wanted a subject that isn't 'hot' and dodgy, he could have written a book on Katori Shinto Ryu or whatever.

Regards,

Posted on: 2010/7/6 19:15
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Re: Read Kacem's New Book(Very disappointing!) Proof wa?
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Mr. Wills,

I do not believe we agreed on these matters, yet it seemed we agreed to disagree, no problem with that I guess!

Regards.

Posted on: 2010/7/6 0:40
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Kuki Takei
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I was wondering if I could pick someone's mind about something that's been bothering me. The Wikipedia page on Shinden Fudo Ryu mentions two people studying under Toda, these being Takanake Tetsunoke, supposedly a senior studend of Kano, and Kuki Takei, a member of the Kuki family. Does anyone know where this comes from? I know not to trust Wiki, yet this has attracted my attention.

Regards!

Posted on: 2010/7/4 1:30
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Re: Read Kacem's New Book(Very disappointing!) Proof wa?
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A few things on this. At first, when studying history, dating a text to a certain period based on a careful analysis of script, handwriting, paper and language used counts as proof. Of course it is not extremely accurate, but it is definately accepted. And for the record, C14 is not the answer to everyting, for if a forger would use paper from the 17th century, this forgery would not be detected by this method. It dates when the material of which an object was made originated, not when the object itself was made. So it dates when the plants that were used for the paper grew. Nothing more.
Furthermore on the Togakure thing. It is very important in historical work to keep an open mind to all possibilities. This includes things done or not done by Takamatsu Sensei, but also things like the opinion of the Kuki family. On their site they implicitly state that they are not glad with other lineages of Kukishin Ryu being around. An historian should not take everything Takamatsu wrote at face value, but the same goes for the Kuki family, especially if there seems to be some kind on animosity or rivalry.
Then, Takamatsu Sensei did spread out his 'debated' schools to more sources then Hatsumi Soke. Fukumoto Yoshio received Menkyo Kaiden in Togakure Ryu and Ueno Takashi received Koto Ryu from him. Oddly enough this line of Koto Ryu seems to be recognised by the Japanese Koryu community, so it would actually be interesting if Takamatsu Sensei 'made this up'.

I hope the above shows that right and wrong, yes and no and the proof for things are not always clear or easy to establish when studying history, especially not when it concerns difficult subjects such as these. Definite proof is hard to find. Viewpoints and interest may vary, and it takes a dedicated scholar who is well versed in the subject matter to give an educated opinion. And more then an educated opinion we will never get. Maybe this is hard to stomach for people who are used to the strict parameters of the Beta sciences, but this is how the study of history works. Which brings me back to the first points. Mr. Zoughari is one of the first historians with the righ background and connections to study Togakure Ryu. Not many others have done this and most of them were not as qualified, either because they were Koryu researchers but did not have access to the source, or, then had access but were not proficient enough in Japanese culture and history to go to the depth where Mr. Zoughari has gone. And the book is a fine example of this. Sure, more could have been written, and I am sure there is a hell of a lot more there if we were to have access to Mr. Zoughari's computer ;) . But the book is a very good start for the general public because it is a good overview and for the Koryu researcher because it presents excerpts from up until now unpublished texts.
Regards!

Posted on: 2010/7/2 22:19
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Re:
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The post on ego and lessons is very interesting. Giving someone a rank could also be a test as in how they/their ego handles it, a fase to work through, a mountain to climb.

I do believe time is of vital importance in the study of Budo. Yet it should not be viewed so strict as in 'how many years in the Booj'. A few examples:

Above was already mentioned that you can train for 10 years, one time a week as a hobby, or someone could train several times a week, visit seminars, set high standards for himself. In this way, no 10 years are the same.

Also, there can be prior life/Budo experience. For instance someone starts in the BJK but is a yoga master. the command of his body and energy would certainly give him a head start. Same goes for other MA. On the one hand, you may have to shed certain (bad) habits you've picked up from other arts, yet prior experience can give you a 'head start'. So again no 10 years are the same.

And then the Godan test. One can imagine someone who is not in the BJK and has now knowledge of our Taijutsu passing the test, just because he is very sensitive through years of Kungfu training, meditation, actual combat experience etc. Of course from someone in the BJK one expects knowledge of the art, but I do believe that the actual thing that is tested with the sakki-test is something far beyond mere skill. I do, however, believe it is the responsibility of the persons taking the test to be at a certain technical level as the test implies that they can teach, and to teach the art one has to posess this technical skill.

Just my 2Eurocents...


Posted on: 2010/7/2 21:00
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