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Re: Authentic Style Ninjutsu / Ninpo Products
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Thank you for the reply.
I was wondering if they were authentically made, or simply shaped like senban.

Posted on: 2013/4/14 5:49
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Re: Authentic Style Ninjutsu / Ninpo Products
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I'll toss you a question right away then, out of curiosity.
Your senban shuriken, how are they made, what material are they made out of, and what did you use as source or example for size and thickness?

Posted on: 2013/4/9 11:54
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Re: Combat martial art?
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I truly believe that the Bujinkan techniques are combat techniques, but only if the students are allowed to train in such a way as to learn how to use them in combat situations.

Of course "mileage vary", just because you've learned and studied doesn't mean you'll survive a life and death encounter, be it on a battle field or mugging, but if you've never practiced applying the techniques in combat situations, you're more likely to be over-confident or simply be surprised at the difference between what you've learned and what happens in that situation, which very well may cost you your life.

Your friend made the right choice in the ring, the only thing he could have gained by breaking his opponents arm was what? A medal, a title, some money, he decided it wasn't worth it.

I'm going to hazard a guess that if the situation had been on the street or in war, he certainly wouldn't have hesitated about breaking an opponents arm.

Posted on: 2013/3/31 12:43
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Re: Masaaki Hatsumi: Dojo Art
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I'll take a bit of the role of devils advocate here.

Why traditional publishing, why kickstarter, why that amount?

Self-publishing would mean incredibly low cost, no pre-printing books, and I'm certain spreading word would be easy, most of us buy anything from or about Soke, and getting it into online stores wouldn't be difficult either (Amazon for example, support Print-On-Demand books from many places, such as Lulu).

Certainly artists and others working on the book should be paid, but if most of the $55.000 is going towards simply producing the book, it feels like that money could have been spent on other things.

As for me, I'll be supporting the kickstarter campaign, because I'd like to see the book published, and it seems to be the only option to getting the book published.

Posted on: 2013/3/30 9:18
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Re: Combat martial art?
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Thanks for the suggestion, Shimajiro, I'll check it out.

Posted on: 2013/3/23 5:34
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Re: Combat martial art?
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My suggestions above are certainly not a comprehensive guide. I'm working on that but that will take time.

Most hand to hand training in the military is limited, and while I don't take it lightly, I really do think that any Bujinkan practitioner with more than one year of experience should be able to outdo any soldier who only has basic hand-to-hand training.

And you're certainly right, the only proof is reality, how training stands up in life and death combat, some of us have and some of us will have that experience while others will not.

I have no doubt that a stricter and more actual combat oriented training schedule would be much more useful than what most are teaching today.

Posted on: 2013/3/22 8:24
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Re: Combat martial art?
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My suggestions for how one should teach are pretty straight forward, I'll write what I think aimed at someone new at teaching.

After teaching the basic movements and techniques, start working on reactive evasion and counter, start slow and build up.

There's little use to learn sword techniques early on, but the evasive techniques can be taught and adopted to modern equivalents such as knives and batons.

Sparring should be done with emphasis on counters and accuracy of basic techniques.

Teach how to move to align yourself and your opponent for follow up attacks, how to use feints and do teach them kyushu points and what kind of attack to use on what point.
Just start slow and add as they learn.

Ever had a strong boshi-ken to the ribs?
Put on some sparring vests and have the students actually counter and punch hard, without gloves (Need to start slow and take time with each student to ensure they have the proper technique so they don't hurt themselves).

How many of you have practiced *all* of the striking techniques against heavy bags or something else?

If you haven't, let me tell you.. you learn real fast what's wrong with your technique and improve really fast.
Doing it wrong at full strength can break your own hand or foot if you haven't practiced it.

Have them note the difference in how a technique is performed when refining it compared to applying it mid to full strength.

Use padded weapons and up the speed.

Teach different levels of intensity and force, in some situations it's only necessary to take down and pin an attacker, in other situations you may need to maim or kill an opponent to deal with other attackers, these situations obviously require different levels of violence.

Practice outside, make it a point not to run for shelter just because it rains, fights and combat don't always happen on nice dry surfaces with great grip.

Cross-train with other schools to let your students feel how to react to people with techniques and mindset other than their own.

Train hard but don't overdo it.

You should come out of training tired but with the feeling that you've learned and/or improved something applicable.

These are just some of the ideas with examples I suggest.

Overall I advocate changes so that training reflect combat application rather than refinement of technique or "feeling", at least until one reaches Shodan.

"join the military" is kind of a lame thing to say, seeing as Bujinkan is a *combat* martial art, with its main focus on hand-to-hand combat any Bujinkan student should outdo the little hand to hand training done at military bootcamp.

Posted on: 2013/3/22 8:06
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Re: Combat martial art?
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The ultimate point?

To hopefully open the eyes of those who wants to teach properly but may not be doing so.

The ultimate test of any warrior is life or death combat, be it one on one in honorable combat, or the nitty gritty of war.

Any teacher who looks at his students and doesn't think they would make it if they went up against another person with the same amount of training in a different art should take a look at how they teach and adjust it.

It really is that simple, Bujinkan Budo Taijutsu is a combat martial art, if your students won't make it in combat, you're failing to teach them right.

Moving correctly and fluidly is great, but in the end it's not more important than being able to use the techniques in real life.

If you can't *apply* the technique, what's the point?

Posted on: 2013/3/22 4:06
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Re: Combat martial art?
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Kent, those things are all part of training, and should be taught from the beginning on up.

But positioning and balance handling are only parts of the whole.

When was the last time you taught your students how to attack various vital points after they've outmaneuvered the opponent?

You say you teach historical combat arts, are you teaching how to make poisons, explosives, how to break into castles?
These things are all part of the schools history, and are techniques contained in the various schools.

The schools that make up Bujinkan Taijuts are all combat schools of one variety or another.

The techniques are designed to subdue, maim, or kill an opponent, that should never be forgotten in training.

There are many teachers making many excuses, ranging from "our techniques are too dangerous to spar", to "we teach historical ninjutsu".

Most of the excuses are not true, or taken to the extreme, such as the dangerous techniques one.

Randori is like going to the gun range, it's important and good, but it doesn't mean you're ready for combat.

Sparring is like going to a situation-course with marker systems, no actual bullets are fired but you train in a realistic manner with an unpredictable opponent with your weapons.

I'm saying that people have shifted from teaching a martial art, to teaching movements based on martial art.

In the end it's simple, Bujinkan Budo Taijutsu is a combat martial art passed down through hundreds of years of proven efficiency on the battle field and off, if your students aren't capable of defending themselves or others in life or death combat after a few years of training, you're teaching them wrong.

Think back a few hundred years and imagine the teachers of the various (Bujinkan) schools looking at your students, would they smile with approval or shake their heads in disdain?

Posted on: 2013/3/22 2:15
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Re: Combat martial art?
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I have not.

Though I see it as relevant to all Bujinkan teachers, I'd love to see input from Shihans.

Posted on: 2013/3/21 2:00
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