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Re: Earthquake!
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The time has come... anyone in Japan get as far away from the fukushima nuclear plant as you can, find shelter and water!

As a friend, I urge you to get out while you can... They are now stating that they are loosing the battle to cool the fuel and they feel a full melt down is at hand.

As a nuclear energy worker I have been watching as this unfolds, I did not want to cause panic and jump the gun (a heightened level of radiation does not mean they are at dangerous levels, and I had hoped they would be able to cool and contain the fuel...that no longer seems to be possible).

I feel that the time has come and that you should all get as far away as possible! Find the best balance between distance, shelter, and supplies that you can!

Remember that inhalation, absorption (through the eyes as well) and ingestion are all pathways for Alpha and Beta, so if you must go outside stay covered. For Neutron and Gamma radiation your best defense is distance and barriers (buildings).

I hope for the best, but I fear the worst. Hopefully it is not to late and you will be able to make your way.

Posted on: 2011/3/15 9:56
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Jon
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Re: Earthquake!
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Thank you for taking the time to post shawn. Glad to hear that things aren't as bad in that region.

Hopefully the initial reports were inflated & that expedient response will reduce the impact.

Posted on: 2011/3/11 22:37
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Re: Kihon training
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Quote:

markspada wrote:

So....let me see if I got this right....

You inexplicably decided to stop your hardcore, arduous training session that we must presume you were engaged in at the time in order to see what was happening on Kutaki and decided to lower yourself to our level in order to explain to us the importance of behaving as, how did you put it...."gentlemen".

Thanks, buddy.

Perhaps Kutaki and other forums like it should be shut down entirely so as to ensure no further distractions from your pursuit of the warrior ways of enlightenment.

That gentlemanly enough in your opinion?


- Mark Spada


I appologize for any confusion brought about on my part, but I was not refering to 'our' or 'us' when I made my comment. I was refering to those few, like yourself, who seem to feel the need to comment in a deconstructive manner on other members in the forum. Maybe taking some frustration out on a punching bag or something similar would be a better outlet. As I'm sure many other members would prefer that the discussions on this site stay on a constructive path, unlike so many other martial arts forums. Though I do not presume to speak on anyone else's behalf.

You're welcome. We're all human and we all have our moments.

Perhaps... though I enjoy reading other peoples perspectives occasionally when I'm at work.

Yes, that was a much better attempt Mark, I appreciate your concern. I think that being a gentleman is one of Soke's most important teachings.

Posted on: 2010/9/16 17:12
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Re: Kihon training
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I recall a quote I've often heard and have read in Soke's books.... something about 'being Gentleman'.

Just a thought!



Let's try to have constructive discussions... if you find that you have so much time to comment on others... maybe some of that time could be dedicated to training instead of typing!

Posted on: 2010/9/16 14:49
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Re: Self Defence
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Quote:

Zenigata wrote:
That being said how do people rate the Bujinkan system as a from of self defence? Is the ability to defend yourself and / or win a fight even important or is it about something else (eg an art of living, a cultural practice, a form of art for arts sake etc)?


On the philosophical side:
I would have to agree with Shawn here... be a gentleman! Thats one way to avoid confrontation. Cause and effect.

Another would be awareness training. Awareness of your surroundings, the people you associate with, the situations, the environment, etc. Just avoid going to that particular bar... you know there will be trouble there... avoid it! Be aware of when you may 'appear' to be an easy target... don't be a victim!

On the Physical side:
A fight is a combination of many factors. Physical ability, technical ability, spirit, and luck. Increasing any of these is to your advantage. Obviously physical strength can be an advantage.

Bujinkan Taijutsu is based upon natural movement. It teaches the use of the whole body [if you put in time & train under a qualified instructor]. As such, practitioners should be capable of striking from a larger range of distances & strike with the body behind a strike not just the muscle of the arm. If you utilize the skeletal alignment taught in taijutsu you will deliver a greater percentage of the force you are able to generate (absorbing less impact into your shoulder in the example of a punch).

The next advantage is that attacks are to weak areas. Whether a strike to a kusho, a joint, or the eyes the force is directed against a weak point in the attackers anatomy.

Taijutsu is considered an unarmed fighting system, though I would argue that it is not applied in such a manor. Whether I pick something up (anything for that matter) or whether my body 'becomes' a weapon (ie 16 striking treasures) I am NEVER unarmed!

There are many forms of self defense & many more arguments to be made. But the woman in your example can use her whole body against the larger attacker, which would be more than enough if applied to the right vulnerable area. And she will be able to utilize taijutsu when she's older and cannot rely on the muscular strength and rigidity of many systems.

My 2 cents

Posted on: 2010/8/3 19:11
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Re: Kyoketsu shoge
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Is there any chance you would have patterns for any other tools?? Feel free to PM me or post on this forum.

Thanks

Posted on: 2010/5/4 7:21
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Re: Mindset
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Flexibility of both mind & body is very important in this art! As you would limit your physical movement, so too would you limit your mental growth.

This is an art, don't be the artist who refuses to try another canvas...

Posted on: 2010/1/26 12:10
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Re: The topic of resistance
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I agree with Nicky690, EXCEPT that I feel that henka are more important than achieving a kata technique... in this way you can better flow with your uke's resistance (on the street)... that being said you should try to learn the technique in the dojo.

IMHO ... a good uke is one who doesn't go for the tori but does not resist the technique. Later you can help the tori with suggestions or by showing openings and ways to improve their taijutsu.
If your tori requests that you move faster or slower, or that you resist more than normal, or less than normal you should help them by doing this.

For now consider your role as uke to be helping your tori to learn techniques that will protect them on the street... don't just go for them & let them build a false confidence that will get them hurt on the street. But don't resist them to build your ego.

In addition to assisting your tori's training ... it is very important that you train while you are uke! Use this time to your advantage, practice your ukemi when thrown to the ground. Look for possible openings in yourself and your tori. You could consider this an opportunity to double your training time in the dojo.

You have to keep in mind that resistance would be lessened when you receive a strike or 2 throughout the technique... tends to loosen ppl up a bit. When you train in a technique & improve your taijutsu you will begin to see more and more of these openings throughout a technique.

How many ppl have continued to wrestle on the ground after having a hand put in their face... they aren't aware that that hand placed on their face was in fact an attack to the eyes. Not many have the mental strength and pain tolerance to continue a fight after having their eyes gouged out! But training is a personal ego battle, it isn't important that you let them know you 'won' so long as you understand the effect of your 'attack' so that you will be better able to protect yourself and your loved ones should that burden fall upon your shoulders in the future.

Posted on: 2009/12/12 16:09
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Re: Nollaig shona agus athbhliain faoi mhaise
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Thank you for the well wishes! I hope all here can appreciate the time spent with your loved ones, loved ones that may one day benefit from your BJK training...

As much as I avoid and hate holiday shopping... May I suggest heading out and studying human behavior under stress at your local mall. Closest thing to a safe "riot" I can imagine, that being said I do like to witness the occasional picketing/ nightclub brawl, etc etc...

Just thought I'd mention that this is a once in a year opportunity to see 'normal' people acting primal. See if you can maintain your calm while observing the mess ; )

Posted on: 2009/12/6 21:06
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Re: Dojos in Southwestern Ontario (Toronto, Waterloo, Kitchener, Guelph etc)
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Hi Tim,

Please let me know where you plan to relocate to in SW Ont...

I've recently graduated from waterloo & there was nothing there when I was there (had to make the trip back to my dojo as often as i could manage). There is a Genbukan dojo in Kitchener which I never attended. There is also a dojo in milton, again I have never attended. Those are the two closest to Guelph to my knowledge.

As for the Toronto area ... there are a few that I am aware of... It would depend upon you're location and how far you are willing to travel. In addition to what it is you are looking for in training... and how far you are willing to travel for quality instruction.

I would highly recommend attending the Canadian Shihan taikai http://bujinkancanada.org/index.html if you are able. This is a good showcase of the Canadian Shihan & their students. Craig Olson has done a great job of bringing the Canadian Bujinkan together. Craig has my thanks and gratitude... for what that's worth ; ) If you are able to attend the event, it may be a good way to evaluate potential instructors... as rank is... well ...rank it is what it is in the BJK. Some chase it & some run from it.

Feel free to post on this forum or PM me. though I will not be able to reply for the next week or so.

I personally train under Frank Hill, in Oshawa. I currently live in Toronto but will be moving 3.5 hrs away... I'll still make the drive! Frank & his senior students are very talented practitioners and instructors... that being said I've only known him for 9 yrs so you may wish to come check things out for yourself. ; )

Posted on: 2009/12/6 20:56
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