Login
Username:

Password:

Remember me



Lost Password?

Register now!
Socialize
 

Recent Topics
   All Posts (Yukkuri)


(1) 2 3 4 ... 8 »


Re: Good Taijutsu from outside the Bujinkan
Villager
Joined:
2003/2/2 17:26
From Abbotsford, BC Canada
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 73
Offline
Quote:

benkyoka wrote: Where does Sutemi fit in?


Sid,
To me it looked like Blue went for a rising move on Red (maybe an overhook?), Red responded with a leg-lift throw. Blue then went for a forward flip, then managed an ugly takedown as part of his recovery on landing. I could accept that as a sacrifice throw.

To answer the OP; I believe that interesting, even amazing movement exists in many styles of MA. We sometimes get caught up with language, using foreign terms to describe things and make them sound more mystical and important. Religion is rife with this, martial arts even more so. So if you take "taijutsu" to simply mean body skills for fighting (and you may not ) then yes other styles can exhibit good taijutsu. If you take it to mean specifically the combative movement method and style unique to BBT, then no. Then there is everything in between, to which I answer;" It depends..."

Chris

Posted on: 2011/8/6 8:17
_________________
Christopher Taylor
Bujinkan Taka-Seigi Dojo Abbotsford (BC) Canada
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: First Class
Villager
Joined:
2003/2/2 17:26
From Abbotsford, BC Canada
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 73
Offline
In the summer of 1983 I convinced my mother that a weekend seminar with a ninjutsu instructor was just the wholesome sort of activity her 15 year old son should engage in. The seminar in question was being hosted by "The Toronto Survivalist Association" and was being held a 4 hour drive from my home.

My mother drove me down and dropped me off in a university parking lot early on a Saturday morning. As I got out of her car a dilapidated cargo van pulled up and disgorged a half dozen dubious looking individuals in mismatched combination of tanktops, black ninja "outfits" and jungle camo. "Have fun!" my mother yelled as she drove off. I was a little concerned....

I need not have worried. They were a pretty good bunch. Some were possibly suffering varieties of mental illness but all were friendly and helpful. I remember doing a lot of work with kusari fundo and tanto, including striking targets with our ropes and cutting rolled up newspaper with live blades. We beat the crap out of each other, and had an amazing amount of fun. A lot of the training then was quite -different- from what it is now. I kept in contact with those guys for many years. Ed Brown became my first sensei, and I owe it to him to starting me on the path those many years ago.

Posted on: 2011/8/3 5:57
_________________
Christopher Taylor
Bujinkan Taka-Seigi Dojo Abbotsford (BC) Canada
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Waza, Kata and Technique
Villager
Joined:
2003/2/2 17:26
From Abbotsford, BC Canada
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 73
Offline
Others here who speak and know Japanese better than me can probably provide better answers...
"Waza" are structured forms of movement, that in the English speaking West we often describe as "techniques". I.E. "kihon no waza" - basic techniques, "omote gyaku no waza" - outside wrist throw technique.
"Kata' are longer forms of movement, typically part of the transmission of knowledge of a particular school/tradition. I.E. "Koku no kata" from Gyokku ryu kosshijutsu. They can be a vehicle for "waza", but they are so much more as well!

I wouldn't recommend that book unless your instructor advises it to you. Your own notes would be much more valuable to you. ***You can't learn BBT from books!*** Books and videos are really just REMINDERS to help you recall something you have learned previously, or perhaps to help you look at a different aspect of something that you already have some understanding of. Think of a connect-the-dots picture. The photos in a book are just the dots - a good instructor helps you draw the line to connect the dots and BBT is the picture you get at the end.

YMMV
Chris

Posted on: 2011/7/28 4:32
_________________
Christopher Taylor
Bujinkan Taka-Seigi Dojo Abbotsford (BC) Canada
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Pitfalls and things to Think about when running a dojo
Villager
Joined:
2003/2/2 17:26
From Abbotsford, BC Canada
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 73
Offline
There are a lot of vampires out there.... so be enthusiastic about what you do, but don't let the uncommitted feed off you. I.E. Don't spend lots of time with back and forth emails and phone calls with people who will never even show for a class. (nb Number of emails X Amount of superlative enthusiasm is inversely proportional to chance of actually coming out. Buying a black keikogi after the first class is the kiss of death. ) I found meeting with prospects for a coffee was a really good way to weed out the undesirables and the poseurs. Its time intensive, but you really only need a few good students.

Posted on: 2011/6/28 5:20
_________________
Christopher Taylor
Bujinkan Taka-Seigi Dojo Abbotsford (BC) Canada
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Musashi Brand Swords
Villager
Joined:
2003/2/2 17:26
From Abbotsford, BC Canada
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 73
Offline
I picked up a "cheap-o" Musashi sword a little while ago, took the edge off with a file and some sandpaper to use like an iaito (not AS an iaito). I would rather have the steel blade than zinc alloy or aluminum And I don't want to bend or destroy a $400+ sword in regular training.

I have a much more valuable blade for cutting.

At work, I have an $800 pair of ophthalmic needle drivers I use for suturing corneas.... however I also have a $10 pair of "Pakistani Surgical Steel" drivers that I keep in my daily use "Suture Kit". Just say'in, sometimes a cheap tool IS the right one for the job.

Posted on: 2011/6/23 4:23
_________________
Christopher Taylor
Bujinkan Taka-Seigi Dojo Abbotsford (BC) Canada
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Fabric for dogi
Villager
Joined:
2003/2/2 17:26
From Abbotsford, BC Canada
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 73
Offline
Ooops!

I assumed incorrectly it would be the same as other fabric weights - I noticed that for cottton duck they actually go by a piece of 36"x22" a bit over 1/2 a square yard. I still go by the 12-16oz weight recommendation however.

Judogi tops are often made of a (softer) different weave. And they're still pretty tough...

Chris

Posted on: 2011/3/1 7:25
_________________
Christopher Taylor
Bujinkan Taka-Seigi Dojo Abbotsford (BC) Canada
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Fabric for dogi
Villager
Joined:
2003/2/2 17:26
From Abbotsford, BC Canada
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 73
Offline
Quote:

Hanna_B wrote:
What kind of fabric is suitable for a dogi? What properties should it have? What might suitably types of fabric be called?

"Duck cotton" is what I often get.

Quote:

OTOH I guess all fabrics have some elasticity in them.


Depends a lot on the weave I believe.

Quote:

but I'm not sure if oz in context menas ounces/square meter, or something else).


oz./square yard traditionally. I usually like a 12 to 16oz weight.
Quote:

The fabric that bought dogis usually is made is a type of canvas, or so I have been told. Most canvas fabrics are very sturdy stuff, not something you use for clothes at all, but I also have in my hand a swatch of canvas that is too thin for a dogi (and that btw also stretches quite a bit).


When I wash mine - it has to be FOLDED, like a piece of cardboard to fit in the dryer. It gets that stiff when wet.

Quote:

How much do the fabric in your dogis stretch, if you pull it diagonally? Perhaps I'd better ask to make some stretching experiments in the dojo next class to see how the fabric in the dogis that people use actually behave.


Good Luck!
Chris
Not much at all - but breathability can be very important.


Posted on: 2011/2/26 7:14
_________________
Christopher Taylor
Bujinkan Taka-Seigi Dojo Abbotsford (BC) Canada
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Interesting article on Tameshigiri
Villager
Joined:
2003/2/2 17:26
From Abbotsford, BC Canada
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 73
Offline
Quote:

RJHIII wrote:
http://kenshi247.net/blog/2011/01/28/ ... ri-from-famous-swordsmen/

[quote]Tameshigiri is something that should be done after many long years of iai training, once one has reached a certain level of licensed proficiency.


In my opinion this is very true, if you are studying iaido. I think the dude in the first video (throwing the sword) needs to go back and spend a lot of time with his iaito before ever being allowed to hold a shinken again.

One of the very cool things to me about BBT is the lack of rubric sensei seems to encourage in us.
I think it important that my students learn how a sword actually cuts, because we don't "just wave it around in the air", but perform kata with a partner, and are envisioning working in that kukan. To practice muto dori with a bokken, but to have never felt how easily a blade can slice through tatami omote, or to envision cutting kesa giri but not to realize how easy it is to get a blade stuck really robs one of significant knowledge.
I also take students to the gun range so that they can understand those weapons better too.

The guy in the 2nd video - at least he's safer with his blade (until he eventually breaks it). Cuttting for him might teach him faster that a sword is not a baseball bat. Then again, his footwork might best be served by something else....

The things people will put on the web (Shaking My Head)

Posted on: 2011/2/1 7:09
_________________
Christopher Taylor
Bujinkan Taka-Seigi Dojo Abbotsford (BC) Canada
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Sudden loss of aerobic capacity?
Villager
Joined:
2003/2/2 17:26
From Abbotsford, BC Canada
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 73
Offline
Quote:

Close follow up with a physician is important to be sure you do not end up like so many of our fellow budoka, dead too soon.



Ditto. Sorry, I also should have put that in, but rushed off. A good diagnosis will,lead to the best treatment!


Chris

Posted on: 2010/12/29 6:51
_________________
Christopher Taylor
Bujinkan Taka-Seigi Dojo Abbotsford (BC) Canada
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Anyone tried Rosetta Stone?
Villager
Joined:
2003/2/2 17:26
From Abbotsford, BC Canada
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 73
Offline
I like the Pimsleur program because it was all on CD and I could play it my car while I drove around. It builds over time with lots of recursion to past lessons, and they start asking you questions to which you must respond.

Chris

Posted on: 2010/12/28 3:51
_________________
Christopher Taylor
Bujinkan Taka-Seigi Dojo Abbotsford (BC) Canada
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer



 Top
(1) 2 3 4 ... 8 »




Today's Sponsor