Login
Username:

Password:

Remember me



Lost Password?

Register now!
Socialize
 

Recent Topics
   All Posts (mindwrench)


(1) 2 3 4 ... 9 »


Re: Training Armour Good or Bad...
Villager
Joined:
2003/2/3 9:05
From Tokyo, Japan
Group:
村民 :: Villager
議長 :: Mod
Posts: 90
Offline
Hey Matt,
Looking a the evolution of clothing and considering its use for training is absolutely part of our budo.
I mean, we DO practice with full armor at times, this includes ukemi in armor.

The problems you are talking about with your shoulder is something many people I have trained with in the bujinkan also share. usually do to improper learning of ukemi. Most people seem to think that just going out and "doing" a lot of rolling and leaping and what not will give you good ukemi. But, as Hatsumi sensei says "taihenjutsu is the foundation of taijutsu", so - would you want to learn your taijutsu in the same manner? I would guess not.

There is a systematic way of learning ukemi ( and remember, ukemi is NOT only rolling, but "recieving" or "catching" the attack, even, as Soke has been telling us lately, "sustaining damage"), this includes learning how to accept punches, kicks, and throws, as well as falling. Learning this way, you will develop your proprioception (position sense) along with increasing the range of motion in your body, becoming able to compress and expand your body to allow the force to dissipate or be redirected appropriately.

Also, before worrying about ukemi, you need to develop the "rope-like body" Soke keeps talking about this year. If you cant move your body through its natural range of motion, you're going to have a hard time with ukemi.

So, next time you're in Japan come on out and do some ukemi training with us...


Rob

Posted on: 2009/11/6 9:30
_________________
Rob Renner

The question you should ask is not
"What will his next attack be and how should I respond to it?",
but "What could I have done beforehand to pre-determine his next move!"
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: A Favour to Ask
Villager
Joined:
2003/2/3 9:05
From Tokyo, Japan
Group:
村民 :: Villager
議長 :: Mod
Posts: 90
Offline
Although "politics" can be impediments to our training, it is also common for people to ignore what Hatsumi Sensei says by claiming they "don't want to get involved in the politics".
What Hatsumi Sensei says consistently over time (such as "train with all of the 4 top shihan" or "there are many high ranked people in the Bujinkan - you must find a good teacher")is not politics. Someone not liking who Sensei has deemed the top 4 shihan and then critisizing one or more of them because they dont do what their teacher does, is politics.

I also heard the rumor that Sensei supposedly said "you should ONLY train with the Shitennou", but there have only been a COUPLE of people that Sensei has said NOT to train with, and they aren't even around anymore!

Like Shawn said, its not possible for everyone to consistently train with ALL 4 of the Shitennou (although I think more people could venture outside their comfort zone and try it occasionally), that doesn't mean someone doesn't have valuable information to share. Hatsumi Sensei is very smart and also quite aware of this fact.
That is why he always tells us that we need to develop the eyes to see what is important in someone's taijutsu and to be able to tell what is real from what is fake.
Therefore it is up to you to make the decision of where you should spend your time, effort, and money.Sensei has made his recommendations the rest is your choice.

Although, again like Shawn said, none of us living in Japan have a full-time, commercial dojo, you should train with everyone, looking for consistency with what Hatsumi Sensei teaches, for example: does it look similar to Sensei? feel similar?
Of course, you should feel free to challenge the information being presented (there are polite ways and not-so-polite ways of doing that and depending on our own level of awareness and ability, we may not be qualified to judge anyway!)

Also, if you want confirmation of a rumor or story when you are here in Japan, check with multiple sources who would know, like people that were actually present when something was said or done. Although I am lucky enough to attend quite a few classes regularly, I don't hear every pronouncement Sensei or the Shihan make, and even if I hear, I could misinterpret it, so check with other people THAT WERE THERE!
(Once again, if it IS confirmed, don't just dismiss it out of hand should it go against your "political viewpoint")

Rob

Posted on: 2009/5/31 23:53
_________________
Rob Renner

The question you should ask is not
"What will his next attack be and how should I respond to it?",
but "What could I have done beforehand to pre-determine his next move!"
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: blogging?
Villager
Joined:
2003/2/3 9:05
From Tokyo, Japan
Group:
村民 :: Villager
議長 :: Mod
Posts: 90
Offline
Quote:

dseago wrote:
"(Paul Masses)"

Oopsie, a typo in haste: inadvertent pluralization. There is only one Paul Masse!


Thank god!

Posted on: 2009/5/19 1:16
_________________
Rob Renner

The question you should ask is not
"What will his next attack be and how should I respond to it?",
but "What could I have done beforehand to pre-determine his next move!"
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Scott Sonnon, "Be Breated", Zdorovye
Villager
Joined:
2003/2/3 9:05
From Tokyo, Japan
Group:
村民 :: Villager
議長 :: Mod
Posts: 90
Offline
Quote:

kouryuu wrote:
As one of those "other styles" that the OP had asked about, has anyone else heard of Scott Sonnon? He's in the past promoted the "Zdorovye Slavic Health System", "Be Breathed" ("Don't breathe - be breathed"), and others.

Here's the wikidpedia article on Scott, and here's some interesting YouTube stuff featuring him.

I'd be interested to hear people's comments...

Shawn


Oh yes, I have indeed heard. But, if you want Russian style information then you are better off to go to actual Systema sources, like Vladimir or Mikhail.

Also, he is quite happy to attack anyone he thinks is using his inventions (words he trademarks), but he will quite happily "appropriate" other people's work and/or unique names or terminology without permission. (IE; rmax powered Bujinkan)



What specifically did you see in his work that you were interested in Shawn?

Rob

Rob

Posted on: 2009/4/3 9:02
_________________
Rob Renner

The question you should ask is not
"What will his next attack be and how should I respond to it?",
but "What could I have done beforehand to pre-determine his next move!"
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Rob Renner Chicago seminar
Villager
Joined:
2003/2/3 9:05
From Tokyo, Japan
Group:
村民 :: Villager
議長 :: Mod
Posts: 90
Offline
Thanks Mike,

I have to say, I was very happy with all the seminars for a couple of reasons:

First, the people who have trained with me in the past are making obvious progress, which makes all the effort of traveling abroad worth it.

Second and more important is seeing the true dedication of the senior people who attended the events. It becomes obvious who is truly interested in Sensei's art.
Guys like Dale Seago, Dick Severance and Bill Atkins, just to name a few.
Although they have been training for more years than either Paul or I, they don't let that stop them from learning and improving.
Their minds are open to exploring new information, even if that information at first seems to contradict what they already "know".
This explains why they, like Hatsumi Sensei, continue to improve.

I feel very fortunate to be part of a community with such high-level people. This "network" fits right in with Sensei's theme this year of being connected. In fact he is always saying that everyone needs to be connected with the training in Japan.

So let me publicly thank everyone who made the seminars as great as they were (you guys know who you are) and I look forward to seeing all of you at training here in Japan.

Rob

Posted on: 2009/4/3 8:48
_________________
Rob Renner

The question you should ask is not
"What will his next attack be and how should I respond to it?",
but "What could I have done beforehand to pre-determine his next move!"
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Another request for info on Tokyo area training
Villager
Joined:
2003/2/3 9:05
From Tokyo, Japan
Group:
村民 :: Villager
議長 :: Mod
Posts: 90
Offline
Hi Steve,

Out dojo is located at the Matsudo Undo Koen, about 12 minutes from Ayase on the Chiyoda Line.

You are welcome to come join us.
THe schedule for classes is below:

Sun - 3pm
Tue - 2pm
Thu - 2pm and 7pm
Fri - 3pm

As you can see, classes are mostly during the day so that I am able to attend Hatsumi Sensei and the Shihan's classes at night.

Hope to see you in Japan,

Rob Renner

Bujinkan
Zeropoint
Dojo

Posted on: 2009/3/2 9:41
_________________
Rob Renner

The question you should ask is not
"What will his next attack be and how should I respond to it?",
but "What could I have done beforehand to pre-determine his next move!"
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Three points of contact
Villager
Joined:
2003/2/3 9:05
From Tokyo, Japan
Group:
村民 :: Villager
議長 :: Mod
Posts: 90
Offline
Good posts guys.

Rob, I understand where you are coming from, but even this year, with the theme of rope, Hatsumi Sensei has talked about having many points of contact so that you allow your opponent to become "tangled up" in your rope-like movement.

If you are saying that only 3 of the points he uses are necessary, well...maybe. At my level I will try to give as much false data as possible (kyojitsu), when I get to Sensei's level, I can do it with a maximum of three.

Anyhow, rather than try to limit ourselves to the "exact way that it is", keep in mind that whatever we think we know right now, will look foolish or at least incomplete to us in the future.

So Rob, work with your three point theory, flesh it out, and let me know how it goes (in the dojo).


Speaking of points of contact and kyojitsu, Paul Masse is amazing at this. If there is anybody in the Bujinkan who can mimic Sensei's taijutsu and come up with the kind of ideas that Sensei does, its Paul.

So the seminar there in the San Fran/ Sacramento area should be a great one Dale. Looking forward top training with you again!

Posted on: 2009/1/29 11:38
_________________
Rob Renner

The question you should ask is not
"What will his next attack be and how should I respond to it?",
but "What could I have done beforehand to pre-determine his next move!"
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Three points of contact
Villager
Joined:
2003/2/3 9:05
From Tokyo, Japan
Group:
村民 :: Villager
議長 :: Mod
Posts: 90
Offline
Quote:

侶武 wrote:


The main disagreement is with having more points of contact.

If you are defending against a highly aggressive person the more contact you make with the person the more aggressive they will become. There are several books on this subject, as well as articles you could look up.

And secondly, the more points of contact the more support you give to them they can borrow your stability.


This is true if you are "torquing" (applying lots of uncontrolled, non-specific tension) into your opponent.
If, however, you are doing what Hatsumi Sensei and the top Shihan are constantly demonstrating, using specific amounts of tension to create a false sense of security in the opponent's proprioceptive system (kyojitsu), then you will be able to have many points of contact and still "take the fight out" of him. (This is what Papasan is referring to I believe)

No matter how aggressive someone is they are still bound by the dictates of bio-mechanics and this includes the pre-conscious feedback mechanism of proprioception. Specific tension applied to multiple points can create proprioceptive dissonance, where the person's nervous system attempts to respond correctly to the contacts, but the data coming in is in conflict with each other, and so causes inappropriate responses ( in terms of balance, placement of body weight, etc).

That being said, you should gradually work up from many points of contact to one or no points of contact (this is also being shown by Hatsumi Sensei and the top shihan regularly).
Whatever the number of conatct points, kyojitsu is always available.

Rob

Posted on: 2009/1/29 1:22
_________________
Rob Renner

The question you should ask is not
"What will his next attack be and how should I respond to it?",
but "What could I have done beforehand to pre-determine his next move!"
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Zero Points
Villager
Joined:
2003/2/3 9:05
From Tokyo, Japan
Group:
村民 :: Villager
議長 :: Mod
Posts: 90
Offline
Hello,
Sorry we are in the process of updating our website.
Please be patient and we will get some material up for you soon.

As for the Aikijujutsu stuff, it does have some crossover (as does gymnastics and many other movement systems), but many of the fundamental principles are actually quite different.

PM me and I will hook you up with some material.

Posted on: 2008/9/9 0:46
_________________
Rob Renner

The question you should ask is not
"What will his next attack be and how should I respond to it?",
but "What could I have done beforehand to pre-determine his next move!"
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Great new blog form Paul Masse
Villager
Joined:
2003/2/3 9:05
From Tokyo, Japan
Group:
村民 :: Villager
議長 :: Mod
Posts: 90
Offline
Paul Masse has started making his writings and artwork public on his blog:

http://web.mac.com/phmasse/martial_profile/Welcome.html

For those of you that don't know Paul, he has been living in Japan for 14 years and training with Hatsumi Sensei 2 or 3 times a week consistently during that time.
He has put much time and effort into following Sensei's footsteps by studying many of the same sources that Hatsumi Sensei studied and by delving into the world of art and Shodo.
This had led him to a very deep understanding of many of the concepts put out there by Sensei and he translates those concepts eloquently.(It doesn't hurt that his taijutsu kicks a$$ too!)

Take some time to check out his blog, you will be glad you did.

Posted on: 2008/8/16 1:13
_________________
Rob Renner

The question you should ask is not
"What will his next attack be and how should I respond to it?",
but "What could I have done beforehand to pre-determine his next move!"
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer



 Top
(1) 2 3 4 ... 9 »




Today's Sponsor