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Re: Instrictor attitudes on students training with other instructors.
Kutaki Postmaster
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Quote:

Yamazu wrote:
Ah, ok, valid point!

Though... How can anyone certify oneself to be a "good" teacher... A good teacher to one might be a bad teacher to another, right?

All we can do is our best, try to follow the path shown by our own teachers, and help those willing to tag along.

Could this be turned around, too; should we teach anyone who comes asking?


All valid points and questions. I am better at teaching certain things than others.

At the same time, there are some stupendously awful teachers out there, and almost all of them advertise in the Yellow Pages. :)

We definitely should not teach just anyone that comes asking.

Posted on: 2013/8/28 12:34
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Glenn R. Manry -

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Re: Instrictor attitudes on students training with other instructors.
Kutaki Postmaster
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Quote:

Yamazu wrote:
Quote:

Given that there are so many poor
teachers in the martial arts in
general, this makes it so much
harder.



Terminology here, too, makes a
difference; what do we mean by
a bad / poor teacher?

The quality of teaching?

Teacher's ability?

Or something else....?

EDIT typo


My point was, given that there are so many poor teachers out there in general, it makes guiding your students that much more difficult. If they have been burned by others, then they may not be as open to listening to advice, even when it is good or appropriate.

Posted on: 2013/8/25 15:27
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Glenn R. Manry -

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Re: Instrictor attitudes on students training with other instructors.
Kutaki Postmaster
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Quote:

Good point!

These are two different issues, indeed! Wanting
to keep students "tied" to oneself... or trying
to keep students from bad things.

Might be difficult to convey it, though... not
to get misunderstood the latter for the first.



This is always the problem. Given that there are so many poor teachers in the martial arts in general, this makes it so much harder.


Posted on: 2013/8/19 15:25
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Glenn R. Manry -

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Re: Instrictor attitudes on students training with other instructors.
Kutaki Postmaster
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You should always talk to your teacher before deciding to train with a different instructor. First, it is just the respectful thing to do. Secondly, there may be things you are not aware of concerning that instructor.

If you have doubts about your own teacher, then the first point is moot.

I had a student once, in a kickboxing class I was teaching, who decided he wanted to train with some guys at a local MMA club. I told him to avoid them, because they have a reputation for injuring people. He went anyway, and got his hand broken (previously injured in a match), because he let them goad him into sparring, when he knew he was injured. They accomplished exactly what they wanted. My student had been successful at some local events, and they wanted him hurt, but probably felt they couldn't do it in a match. Sometimes it isn't ego that prompts a teacher to tell you not to do something.

That being said, if a teacher says you should only train with him or her ever, period, then that may be a sign of a problem.

At the same time, why do you want to go train with another person? If you don't feel you can tell your teacher about it, then maybe that issue needs to be dealt with in a mature and polite fashion.

Posted on: 2013/8/19 4:44
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Glenn R. Manry -

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Re: Interesting questions (I think)
Kutaki Postmaster
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Quote:

koryu wrote:
Thank you for your contributions, I am enjoying.
And waitiing for new ones.
Just a little note before leaving yourselves to continue.
I think what has come down to us from the old schools is
only the soup of the soup of the soup, lots of water and little substance.
Don't you think so?
Yet we still like it and try to figure out how should be
the authentic flavor.


With some schools that might be the case. If you can find the right teachers in the Bujinkan, their is plenty of substance.

Some schools of iaido definitely seemed to have lost their deeper meanings and applications and have replaced it with spiritual mumbo jumbo.

This has happened in a lot of karate as well. Although there are many schools returning to their roots to figure things out.

I think this is why Hatsumi sensei was speaking so much about kaname recently. Make sure you understand the essential points. Therefore, find good teachers.

Posted on: 2013/3/11 10:30
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Re: Interesting questions (I think)
Kutaki Postmaster
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These are good questions for people to consider if they are not familiar with kobudo or koryu.

In iaijutsu schools, there is the omote and ura of kata. Without going into too much detail, the omote is what is showed to the public, while the ura is what is "more realistic." When you are showed these kuden, then the entire character of the school can change dramatically.

The same is true for the schools in the Bujinkan. Hatsumi sensei has frequently showed the ura and omote of kata at Daikomoyosai, and some of these are on video.

The mention of the two Koto Ryu kata are good examples of when things flip, and you see "offensive" movement.

This is why it is so important to get competent instruction, so that your teacher can eventually point these things out when you are ready.

My experience in the Bujinkan and other budo has shown me that these arts are very, very deep and always shifting, for all their tradtion.

Posted on: 2013/3/10 15:17
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Glenn R. Manry -

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Re: Reiho question
Kutaki Postmaster
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When I said kensen above, I was informally (sure, not because I am exhausted) referring to the sankyo position, as in kendo and some iaido practice.

Sorry if I caused confusion.

Posted on: 2012/10/31 15:52
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Re: Reiho question
Kutaki Postmaster
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There are so many forms of reiho throughout bujutsu. Even in iaido/iaijutsu, even within the same general schools (but different lines) there can be profound differences.

Masaoka ha MJER is different from Yamauchi ha MJER (and there are multiple lines in Yamauchi ha too that probably have differences).

Kukishin is different from Takagi Yoshin ryu, and each line has its differences within those general schools.

My take on it has always been to see the generalities of purpose and how the specifics of each school address those general areas that are found in each school.

In Yamauchi ha MJER, for example, there are specifics for how the sageo is handled, and the reasons are combative, even though it is Reiho, and that is just one example. This is true for every legitimate form of bujutsu.

Differences, like the ones you speak of may stem from situational considerations. Are you indoors in formal clothes, outdoors in armor, or are you in the midst of a combative exercise (kensen for example).

Today, we practice reiho as ritual more than as practicality, but it is good to study what is behind it.

That's about all I will say on this topic. There are others who can delve into our ryu-ha much more expertly than I. As I said, understand the generalities first, specifics after.

Posted on: 2012/10/31 15:28
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Glenn R. Manry -

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Re: Instructors in the Napa Valley area
Kutaki Postmaster
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There used to be a dojo in Santa Rosa, not sure what the instructor's name was.

I remember seeing it when I visited with my wife, but that was over ten years ago.

Wait, just found their web page.

http://santarosabujinkan.com/

Posted on: 2012/8/27 13:58
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Glenn R. Manry -

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Re: Tanren Uchi
Kutaki Postmaster
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Quote:

Toruko-jin wrote:
I agree that Cold steel's Bokken is nearly undestructable still I do not like it much as it shakes a lot to the sides. You mostly can not feel the straight angle of the cut because of that expansion.
For the Tanren Uchi, I do not follow a discipline...whenever I want I find sth. to hit..a wall, a tree..whatever works..try to punch, hit with fingers, grab etc. just to keep the hands strong enough.


I thought this too, at first. Then I realized that it flexes because I apply too much pressure through my right hand. So, I use its flexibility as a tool to assess how even my power application is through my hands.

If I keep it even and use my body and legs, then I get no flex. Also, I use the okatana rather than the regular katana, it is a bit more stout.

I appreciate the reply. Hopefully, this can continue, as I am being reminded of a lot of things.

Posted on: 2012/3/26 13:21
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