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Re: Teaching methods
Kutaki Postmaster
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Quote:
Masatoki wrote:
At first, my teacher followed the Ten Chi Jin very closely.
However, nowadays not at all. I'm not feeling at my ease, at this regard.


Why?

The worst thing you can do at this stage in your training is not trust your teacher's judgment of what you need to grow in this art. Just keep going.

"Wax on, wax off"

I personally have NEVER used TCJRNM in my teaching, for example. I feel I can teach things more effectively through other means. Perhaps your teacher knows more about your needs than you do.... Crazy idea, I know.

-ben

Posted on: 2006/3/5 6:40
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Re: Teaching methods
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Quote:
Darren wrote:
You may live in an area where the only training around is a shibu ran by a kyu ranked student, but if it's the only training available - then take what you are being offered.


...and as they are affiliated to a Shidôshi/Shihan who is teaching them in turn on a regular basis, you will be getting that too. There's surely seminars in the area, and trips to seminar outside. One just needs to grab the tail of the horse as strongly as possible and ride!

Posted on: 2006/3/5 16:03
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Ari Julku
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Re: Teaching methods
Villager
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From Anderson, Ca USA
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Well said Ari and Darren!

The primary effect of this art appears to generate in the student a willingness to depart from the usual routine of Martial training. Such as, Take every "Free Introductory" Course offered in your accessible area over and over again until they catch on and ban you. Or you join another system in the hopes of meeting up with someone from the one you want.

For example, I support sport sparring for kids (try saying that three times fast), and attend and have performed Demos at tournaments. I have been requested to judge, score, perform logisitics and Administration. I have met many a Budoka through these many roles. I am certain there are others who do too.

Through attending seminars and tounaments our little group became and has spread. Thanks to contact with many Bujinkan people at these events. All this was possible through being there! Getting to be personally known.

You are never alone, just go where the budoka hang out. Events are a great opportunity. Attending is often cheaper than advertising, and the rewards so much greater. Participation is your option.

Posted on: 2006/3/6 11:18
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Re: Teaching methods
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First of all, again tanks a lot to everyone gave me information or/and advices.
I have understood that Bujinkan training method is really peculiar.

With regard to this fact, I can say now that having a previous experience in more "standard" martial arts might be (imho) not necessarily an advantage.

Actually, I felt that something wasn't responding to the mental pattern I had already gotten: this is the cause -I suppose - that made me feel a discomfort.

Anyway, my problem wasn't studying few techniques, on the contrary too many and - ever imho - not very much related.
Moreover, I've seen very effective techniques, but often no more than a pair of times.
So I asked to myself: could I use them if I were under a real attack?

The answer was, simply: I don't know at all.
Of course, even if I'd seen a technique several times I couldn't be sure to be able do use it effectively...
A classic question, no doubt!

Posted on: 2006/3/10 21:08
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Re: Teaching methods
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Quote:

Masatoki wrote:
With regard to this fact, I can say now that having a previous experience in more "standard" martial arts might be (imho) not necessarily an advantage.

You would be essentially correct. It took me over two years to rid myself of the "bad" habits I'd acquired from a year and a half of TaeKwonDo.

Quote:

Masatoki wrote:

Anyway, my problem wasn't studying few techniques, on the contrary too many and - ever imho - not very much related.
Moreover, I've seen very effective techniques, but often no more than a pair of times.


Get used to it. In the Bujinkan, we're not so much interested in the perfection of a technique as per "classical" martial arts, but in the perfection of moving within the flow of an "aggressive negotiation." As you probably well know, "the best laid plans of mice and men often go astray," as Hemingway once said. Don't look for a physical relationship between techniques. Look for a relationship in how balance is taken, at how timing is interupted. If you've seen the same technique a "pair of times," as you stated, then you are quite lucky.

Gambatte...

Posted on: 2006/3/14 9:38
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Ron Bergman
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Re: Teaching methods
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The other day I was watching a video clip of Arnaud teaching and at the end there was an interview. The interviewer asked if he had any suggestions for new students and he said "basics. Learn the basics". He then went on to identify basics as postures, rolling, striking and kihon happo (I would also add the Sanshin no Kata). He said all the different techniques are just for fun.

Having trained with Arnaud on a few occasions, I can say that he also expects his seniors to do the same on a constant basis. Basics all the time!

So, if there were any mechanics that should be "memorized", I would say it is the basics that Arnaud spoke of. Outside of that, it's all just play.

Happy training!

Posted on: 2006/3/15 1:38
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Re: Teaching methods
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Quote:

bencole wrote:
...Perhaps your teacher knows more about your needs than you do.... Crazy idea, I know.

-ben


... or maybe your teacher is a total whack job.

Best advice is to catch a couple of seminars in your area and check their movement against your instructors. If they are way off... perhaps it is time to get another instrutor.

Honestly - if you don't trust your instructor, then the relationship is suffering (probably beyond repair) from more problems then you are citing.

Find someone else, or find something else.

-Daniel Weidman
Bujinkan TenChiJin Guy...

Posted on: 2006/3/15 6:17
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Re: Teaching methods
村長 :: Sonchou
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Quote:

DCWeidman wrote:

Honestly - if you don't trust your instructor, then the relationship is suffering (probably beyond repair) from more problems then you are citing.

Find someone else, or find something else.


I think he should be careful with this. In my very humble opinion and by my experiences a beginner with less than a year of training behind can't judge the instructor's skills with an unquestionable safety. I think it needs just more time. (Unless the guy is such a wannabe and his bullshitting is so obvious.)

Quote:

DCWeidman wrote:

Best advice is to catch a couple of seminars in your area and check their movement against your instructors. If they are way off... perhaps it is time to get another instrutor.


Yes, that can be a safe point to examine things from. I'd recommend the same. However he still has to have a flexible point of view while checking out other instructors, as we all know that each instructor/shihan has his/her own style, which manifests in their movement. So their movements will be somewhat different which in itself does not mean that they are any better or that his instructor is any worse than the others.
It sometimes confuses people.

Just the other side of the coin...

Eva

Posted on: 2006/3/15 18:27
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Eva Barbara Bodogan
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Re: Teaching methods
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Quote:

Cuthalion wrote:

I think he should be careful with this. In my very humble opinion and by my experiences a beginner with less than a year of training behind can't judge the instructor's skills with an unquestionable safety. I think it needs just more time. (Unless the guy is such a wannabe and his bullshitting is so obvious.)

...So their movements will be somewhat different which in itself does not mean that they are any better or that his instructor is any worse than the others.
It sometimes confuses people.

Just the other side of the coin...

Eva


Hey Eva -

First off, he is making those kinds of judgements already (see these quotes):

Quote:

...I've been attending a Ninjutsu class for almost one year.

Moreover, I've seen very effective techniques, but often no more than a pair of times. So I asked to myself: could I use them if I were under a real attack?


It appears he has prior MA experience.

In all honesty - to cut to the chase: He doesn't seem to trust his instructor (for whatever reason) - or else he wouldn't post questions about teaching styles on a web board. If you don't trust who you are learning from, move on. ...Or invalidate your reasons for mistrust and jump back in.

Either way - you have to get past the trust issue (and the answer isn't - ignore your instincts and just drink the coolaid (which is the gist of the responses here)).

Hope this helps -

-Daniel Weidman
Bujinkan TenChiJin Guy...

Posted on: 2006/3/16 7:18
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Re: Teaching methods
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I felt like i hit a plateau a year ago and i made the terrible mistake of cutting down my time i spent trainging and willing to do the basics.
It made me think of a story my instructor told me about 3 shihons trainging with Soke and they asked him to teach them Gyokushin Ryu or Gikan Ryu. So, Soke took a shinai and came at the first one and told them to move, or dodge it, and soke hit every one with the shinai. Those are supposed to be basics and they hadn't LEARNED those yet so how could they learn Gyokushin ryu or Gikan ryu.
So, i strongly advise that you stick with it and take the mind set of, I am going to learn something today, to the Dojo everytime you go. My instructor used to tell us to leave our day at the door and enter ready to train.
I guess im just reiterating what everyone else has been saying and thats just because its the best advice.
Oh, and it is true that teaching technique thing, its true, i teach completely different than my instructor, but its the same core teachings, the TCJRNM and some ryu-ha.
i hope this helps!

..Thomas

Posted on: 2006/3/16 16:30
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