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Re: Mindset
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Shikin Haramitsu Daikoumyou could truly be taken as the proper atitude, otherwise, why chant it before and after training.

This, however, could leave a beginer somewhat lost. A lot has been said and writen on the meaning of this ancient prayer beyond the breif translation given to it on the Ten Chi Jin, this understanding is a good place to start. The idea of Mushin certainly ties in to this atitude or "kamae" towards training. But this also leads to a deep well of ideas that is pretty soiled by common misconceptions around what Mushin realy is. One could safely start at one of the central ideas in Budhism, that is, the root of sufering is attachment.

A loose, unatached attention can go a long way into allowing the newly learned movements and concepts to become internalized. Where a fixed and local attention will miss the so important things that go on "in between the lines".

Emptying ones cup also is conected to detachment from what my teacher calls the "I already know this" box, which most of us carry around. Preconcieved ideas blur our perception of new lessons, and this is made worst by the pridefull feeling of knowing something, which automatically shuts off the possibilities of new angles of understanding.

Detachment from desire to do this or that technique, or to to do good looking techniques will allow for the expression of natural techniques. It is a fundumental aspect of desire, that the greter it is, the more it hinders our capacity to act properly on it´s object.

Detachment from ego will make for clarity of judgement in personal realtionships with our training partners. The more full of ourselves we are, the less we see the people and situations around us for what they trully are. The less we see, the more we stumble into walls of unwanted circumstances.

Detachment as implied here is not a denial of reality or an escape from it, it is simple the romoval of any obstructions to it´s full experience. One could think here of the idea of Shizen no Kamae (Natural Atitude).

Adding perseverence to this natural feeling, or perservering naturaly, I feel this could point the way towards a proper mindset for our training.

I hope this can help make a bridge to a personal and true understanding of these concepts.

Gambate Kudosai!

Posted on: 2010/1/22 16:37
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John Holladay
Bujinkan Manaus - Brazil
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Re: Mindset
Permanent Village Fixture
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Flexibility of both mind & body is very important in this art! As you would limit your physical movement, so too would you limit your mental growth.

This is an art, don't be the artist who refuses to try another canvas...

Posted on: 2010/1/26 12:10
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Jon
"Take this with a grain of salt, hell salt to taste"
“He who seeks knowledge begins with humbleness”, Buju Banton
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Re: Mindset
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Quote:

Tessen wrote:
A Buddhist scholar said what really matters is "how you come in".

For the record, the litany is 詞韻波羅密大光明 ( しきんはらみつだいこうみょう). The most common transliteration in the Latin alphabet is shikin haramitsu daikoumyou.


That's fascinating.

A different Buddhist scholar once imparted these very wise words:

"YOU'RE THE MEANING IN MY LIFE
YOU'RE THE INSPIRATION
YOU BRING MEANING TO MY LIFE
YOU'RE THE INSPIRATION

I WANNA HAVE YOU NEAR ME
I WANNA HAVE YOU NEAR ME SAYIN'
NO ONE NEEDS YOU MORE THAN I
NEED YOU."

It is from an ancient text attributed to a mountain ascetic known only as

Peter Cetera

It's served me well in my approach to training over the years.


Mark Spada

Posted on: 2010/1/28 9:54
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Re: Mindset
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Quote:
Is there a perfect mindset for approaching training?


Yes, find a good teacher and become his student. Follow him with an open,candid and honest mind for as long as you are able too.

Posted on: 2010/1/28 23:33
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Eduard Divantman
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Re: Mindset
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My ideas on mindset at the moment are pretty reflective of a long discussion I had with Sakuma-sensei. Basically looking at the dojo as a laboratory and having the mindset of a researcher, looking at the examples and trying to reproduce the experiments myself to see how close I can get to the same results – if I can’t examine why. I look at what I am doing and try to find improvements and efficiencies. Testing it out on different people and giving the experiment out to my school and observing how it works and where it fails for different people and body types. Looking at variations and changes according to different variables, reactions and counters and finally trying to find conclusions and possibilities for further research.

Posted on: 2010/1/29 9:22
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Re: Mindset
Kutaki Postmaster
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I don't know about "perfect" but I think it's hard to go wrong if you take responsibility for your own training and make sure you have a good teacher. That means that you're clear with yourself and your teacher about your expectations and goals and that you force yourself to be brutally honest with/about both yourself and your teacher. It's important to recognize that as a fallible human being your teacher is your (possibly temporary) guide, not your god.

Both you and your teacher need to know your goals and constatly monitor your progress to make sure that your skills continue to grow and your illusions continue to shrink.

When it comes to being honest with and about your teacher(s), if you're not getting what you want/need out of classes, you should talk to your teacher about it and be honest. Mabye it's just a misunderstanding. Maybe not. Your teacher evaluates you, but you should be evaluating your teacher as well because as you grow, your needs and even your perceptions can change. It's important to have the teacher that's right for you.

Having had both very good and very bad teachers in the past I've developed something I call the "deaf test". I pretend I can't hear anything so all I'm left with is their movement. This way I can't be impressed by their stories of how close they are to a certain someone at the top, I can't hear them telling me what I want to hear, I can't hear their sales pitches, etc. The only input I have is the way I see them moving. Then I ask myself some questions: Is that how I want to move? If they're claming to teach something classical, does what they're doing look like it might actually belong on a battle field or does it look more like a bad dance? Do their knees cave in in kamae? How are their other basics? Does their movement look a lot like some other style? And so on. Of course everyone has something to learn from everyone else, but when you turn the soundtrack off you start to see the absolute best case of the result you're heading for if you spend a lot of time training with that person, so if the picture you're left with isn't overly compelling to you, then maybe you're not looking at the right teacher for you. Try it. The results can be surprising.

Nobody cares as much about your training as you do, so even though you have to follow other people at times to get what you want, I recommend being highly aware of and in control of that process. In the early years of training that can be hard to do, but if you're willing to observe honestly it becomes much easier and more accurate with experience.

[editied for a missing word and punctuation]

Posted on: 2010/2/3 1:30
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John
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Re: Mindset
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There is a real religious nature to people, and who you hang out with and learn from will affect your spiritual life. Choose an instructor or method that helps you grow your faith, not damage it.

Leam

Posted on: 2010/2/6 20:29
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Leam Hall
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Re: Mindset
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yes one must be very careful in your selection of your teacher. Individual religious beliefs should not be part of the class, each person is entitled to their own way of believing. It is, however, an instructors job to make certain that students have a good heart. Professing a religious "faith" does not guarantee that there is also a good heart.

Posted on: 2010/2/7 12:43
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Ed Martin aka Papa-san
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Re: Mindset
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Quote:
Is there a perfect mindset for approaching training?

I would say Yes!

This is a very difficult and important question, and I will not be able to give a conclusive answer.

I think you will learn the "right" mindset by training. And the instructor is very important tool for it . The mind/heart is perhaps the most important thing of all in my opinion it will illuminate all of your movements and deeds.

A sincere honest mind will make the art effective, it is not crisp and sharp by itself.

What makes you able to create with body and mind together is the "right" way.

Sincerely,
Onni
Seishindojo

Take it for what it is worth-happy training!

Posted on: 2010/5/14 6:26
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