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Principles
Village Old Timer
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Many people talk about the principles, but how certain our we about the principles?

There is also something important to consider; should the principles be "taught" or explained in the beginning?

The only principle that should be "taught" and demonstrated in the beginning are the principles of "study" and "practice". These two principles will guide the Budoka. Practice is a loaded concept, it requires an ability to mold oneself and push foward, it also requires the proper spirit and capacity. ”才能魂器” is the basic requirement for a budoka to attain the actual benefits of practice and study, to take the budoka to the heights.

心技体 (the mind/spirit, technique and body) is another important principle to consider in one's study and practice. Since action we do in the martial arts require these three aspects. However, these concepts need not be explained just said while the student is guide through their training. One cannot progress without having these three things developed. And how they are developed will probably be related to one's "才能魂器".

There are several martial art principles of the body and mind, that many on here never talk about or they haven't heard about. And, many of these other principles are just as important. However, they aren't something one can grasp onto until one has developed sufficiently and has practiced and trained both the mind and body while developing their technique. Even, "no technique"(henka) is a technique born via the development of these things. The lines blur only when one has reached a certain state or place in one's training.

Other principles that are important like the following list:

1. shisei (posture of both mind and body)
2. taisabaki/ashisabaki (body and foot movement)
3. uchi waza / nage waza (striking and throwing)
4. zanshin (awareness)
5. kukan (space, timing, and distance)

There are other principles and concepts, but largely they will go unknown by most.

Practice should lead one to these principles without ever knowing their names, but is everyone's training and practice building the proper foundations for their understanding?

Posted on: 2009/7/18 22:04
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Re: Principles
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That is always the question Rob. It is also one the student has to answer for themselves or they never will progress. It is rather easy to see if a person is operating from an understanding of principles just by watching their taijutsu. It is useful to know names but not critical to ones skill level, for that one MUST work within those principles. I do agree that study, practice, and self discipline are critical principles/values. One other I would add is a critical but open mind.

Posted on: 2009/7/18 22:19
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Re: Principles
Village Old Timer
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Quote:

Papa-san wrote:
That is always the question Rob. It is also one the student has to answer for themselves or they never will progress. It is rather easy to see if a person is operating from an understanding of principles just by watching their taijutsu. It is useful to know names but not critical to ones skill level, for that one MUST work within those principles. I do agree that study, practice, and self discipline are critical principles/values. One other I would add is a critical but open mind.


Great Faith. Great Doubt. Great Effort.

Posted on: 2009/7/18 22:24
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Re: Principles
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Quote:

Papa-san wrote:
It is rather easy to see if a person is operating from an understanding of principles just by watching their taijutsu.


Which principles are we talking about here?

If you don't understand the principles then any judgement of another's taijutsu is automatically flawed as you have an incorrect understanding on which you base your judgement.

Posted on: 2009/7/19 0:23
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Re: Principles
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Principles of balance, position, movement, distance, and angles. A skilled practicioner of taijutsu will put themselves in a "safe" place while putting their opponent is a very vulnerable one. They will already know what their opponent is capable of doing from the position they are in and have moved to counter it before it happens.

Posted on: 2009/7/19 12:37
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Re: Principles
Village Old Timer
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The principle of movement is interesting. I'd like to hear more about what you think this principle entails.

Maai is also interesting. As well as controlling angles like the seichusen and kensen and the like as these are also connected to balance and being "safe". I'd like to hear more about these too.

Posted on: 2009/7/19 12:56
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Re: Principles
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Quote:

Papa-san wrote:
Principles of balance, position, movement, distance, and angles. A skilled practicioner of taijutsu will put themselves in a "safe" place while putting their opponent is a very vulnerable one. They will already know what their opponent is capable of doing from the position they are in and have moved to counter it before it happens.


But boxers, wrestlers, and practitioners of other martial arts also do this, as well as people who have experience in combat/fighting.

Posted on: 2009/7/19 14:16
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Re: Principles
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Of course they do, if they wouldn't they would have NO effectiveness in their sport. Now that really is the point. While we are not the only combat art, we are one that is very extensive in what is taught. The sport arts limit what they do within these principles in order to stay within the rules of their game. We don't. Now that has been pointed out many times.
On the principle of movement,IMO it involves small subtle movements that are just enough to do what is intended. There is no waisted energy or time, often it is even hard to see. It does put you in that "safe" place for as long as you need to move to another "safe" place. This really takes an understanding of what IS a safe place and that means you must know what your opponent can do from whatever position s/he is in. It is not just hands and feet, it is knees, elbows, head, hips, shoulders, and everything. This does take training and it won't happen overnight. The harder it is for your opponent to understand what you are doing the more likely it is to work. Surprise is always a great equalizer.

Posted on: 2009/7/19 23:48
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Re: Principles
Village Old Timer
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Sports and the like don't limit the use of principles they do different things with them.

They guard what's coming next and try to put themsevles in a better position a "safe" position. They use the element of suprise and subtle movements as well.

When two skilled judoka fight this is apparent as with kendoka and sumo wrestlers.

What principles do you teach if you teach them at all, to your students and how do you teach them?

What bujinkan principles do you teach, or Japanese martial art principles do you teach? ( if you teach them)

Posted on: 2009/7/20 13:10
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Re: Principles
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Quote:
What bujinkan principles do you teach, or Japanese martial art principles do you teach? ( if you teach them)


1) The primary principle we hear and say over and over is "Gambatte".

2) Lately we have heard Sensei talking about the "structure" of the body. This has sparked an analogy of the body being similar to an "I" beam (shoulders/spine/pelvis). I have had some students think about attacking this I beam to take the balance of the Uke.

3) Still other student and I have been working on "not being committed" to a technique. The idea that you have to be open to and move from technique to technique as the opportunities present themselves in order to avoid "completing" the technique and having no place else to go. (I didn't explain it well, but if you have been around Sensei I'm sure you can give it a better "principle" word).

These are some of the principles that I have been using recently to help students work through their journey. I think you will find a version of these ideas in any endeavor (physical or mental) and I have always said the things you struggle with in the Dojo, you will also struggle with in life.

Marty

Posted on: 2009/7/20 14:19
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