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Re: Training in the "now"
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Hello,<br /><br />I just heard a sermon recently that says to reach "enlightment" one must be in the state of "now", the lecturer says that our true self is our heart not our mind, and most of the time our mind is affecting our heart by popping up clouds of thought that takes us (our heart) to the past or the future so it would be hard for us to concentrate in doing something or focus in something we currently are doing. Because this happens all the time, often we just don't realize it, it's just being in a room where the refrigerator is humming but because we hear the humming all the time the noise becomes very subtle, but when the humming stops suddenly it becomes very quiet. So when we can block the mind from popping up thoughts by meditating, he says that we are entering the state of "now" where everything is calm and we become more aware about the surrounding. Maybe this relates to the topic and the training 

Posted on: 2008/6/17 16:15
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WHY SO SERIOUS????????
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Re: Training in the "now"
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Quote:

raitei12110 wrote:
After hearing about Greg Dilley's passing, I am very much in the now.


I only met him once and I am going to miss him. I was looking forward to seeing him at next years March seminar. He was an awesome fellow, not to mention hilarious.

Found this on his blog from when one of his students fell in a rock climbing accident.

"Losing someone we care for is one of the sufferings of being a human being. Certainly most would agree that the experience is worth the price, but in these painful moments it's difficult to be reminded of that."

Sorry to deviate from the topic, this will be the only time.

Posted on: 2008/6/17 20:02
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Re: Training in the "now"
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On the topic (but slightly askew - excuse my lack of a higher understanding of the concept [just a kyu-kyu here]), has anyone ever heard of the "drunk-buddy" approach?

You have the attitude that the uke is your "drunk buddy" whom you need to apply pain to stop his actions, (to ensure you are doing the technique correctly) but must also avoid injuring him because he is your friend.

The uke can have the correct attitude of hostility while you maintain a calm demeanor in subduing him. I can't recall an injury in free response training yet using this. (3-4 trainings a week, every week for probably over 6 months.)

Posted on: 2008/6/17 21:33
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Re: Training in the "now"
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Quote:

Erizabesu wrote:
Thomas, this is not the best place to mention that.


Elizabeth,

I don't think there is a "best" place. The same idea applies to self-intoxicating esoteric rhetoric.


Thomas Curran
Tokyo, Japan

Posted on: 2008/6/21 2:32
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Re: Training in the "now"
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Thomas, there is no good place to deliver bad news, true, and self-delusion is bad news, to be sure.

Posted on: 2008/6/22 20:55
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Re: Training in the "now"
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I think that is similar to "brother in law" techniques. This is where you do need to control an unruly person but if you hurt them in the process your whole family will be on you!! So you can't do anything that would injure him.

Posted on: 2008/6/22 21:22
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Re: Training in the "now"
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While training with Sharaishi Shihan last year, he told me "no hit - shock with touch", "touch control" and "best balance - best opportunity".

These are all concepts you can't get through memorization of technique, per se. Nor can you necessarily get that through repetitious drills. Nor can you get that by thinking.

These things rely totally on being 100% in the moment (i.e. "now"), to exist in the nagare of the action and intent of your uke, to establish and maintain a connection with all that is happening.

When you are in that perfect space of timing, distancing and angling, you are "in the now". You can do what Sharaishi Shihan was saying. The specific kata is not as important, other than to control those 3 elements.

For most, getting to that point is nowhere as difficult as maintaining it. That's where true mastery lies, in my opinion.

Posted on: 2008/6/23 1:55
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Re: Training in the "now"
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Quote:

Darren wrote:
These are all concepts you can't get through memorization of technique, per se. Nor can you necessarily get that through repetitious drills. Nor can you get that by thinking.



I feel that meditation such as zazen can help enhance concentration which may improve performance. Sometimes stepping out of the world of budo can actually enhance what you are doing. This type of problem solving approach is similar to how massage therapists in Japan deal with problematic areas of the body. For example, if a patient complains of neck pain, the therapist will search for other areas of the body which are the cause of the pain without even touching the neck.


Sorry everyone (the following is not directed at anyone in particular), but this thread got me thinking about the over-analyzation of budo. Do people here find themselves analyzing the processes of digestion and defecation? Shouldn't budo be the same? Isn't talking about the concept of nagare equivalent to suffocating it? Why analyze how to kill people? Just do it and be done with it. That is how the guy you never want to meet in a dark alley is probably thinking.


I feel that some people need to turn their diamonds back into carbon. Get some dirt under those fingernails...yup, right up in there where it is really difficult to get out.


Don't be afraid to be "wrong." Staying alive is never wrong.



Thomas Curran
Tokyo, Japan

Posted on: 2008/6/25 19:51
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Re: Training in the "now"
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Quote:

raitei12110 wrote:
Sorry everyone (the following is not directed at anyone in particular), but this thread got me thinking about the over-analyzation of budo. Do people here find themselves analyzing the processes of digestion and defecation? Shouldn't budo be the same? Isn't talking about the concept of nagare equivalent to suffocating it? Why analyze how to kill people? Just do it and be done with it. That is how the guy you never want to meet in a dark alley is probably thinking.

I feel that some people need to turn their diamonds back into carbon. Get some dirt under those fingernails...yup, right up in there where it is really difficult to get out.

Don't be afraid to be "wrong." Staying alive is never wrong.


My analysis is that the overanalysis issue is a hole I find myself falling in sometimes.

One reason, for me, is simply that analysis and philosophizing are easier and less painful than training. Training is tiresome, time-consuming, and relatively expensive. I get dirty, bruised, and frustrated, and worse I see my limitations. It's easier to sit in a chair and chat!

Another might be a vestige of a Western mindset, where answers come through analysis and brain-work generally. I've always loved how the shihan "show" techniques, but don't spend much time talking, about the techniques much less the budo philosophy.

Posted on: 2008/6/25 21:22
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Re: Training in the "now"
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llong wrote:

Training is tiresome, time-consuming, and relatively expensive. I get dirty, bruised, and frustrated, and worse I see my limitations. It's easier to sit in a chair and chat!



I really appreciate your honesty. It really is quite expensive (especially if you throw in a pizza at Coco's for good measure). I loved it when Shawn Gray compared the potential hospital fees stemming from a violent encounter to training fees over a certain period in a past episode of Kutaki No Ha. Mr. Gray realizes that training IS expensive. Wait...is that his seminar banner up there?


And as G.I. Joe says, "Knowing is half the battle."


Thomas Curran
Tokyo, Japan

Posted on: 2008/6/25 22:14
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