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Re: Principles
Village Old Timer
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1) The primary principle we hear and say over and over is "Gambatte".


I'm not sure this is a Bujinkan principle or if it is simply a Japanese langauge thing. I hear it everywhere, in Basketball matches and baseball, and in times of test taking at school. In either case it is important and probably related to having a proper shisei.

But, there are other related principles or ideas in Issho Kenmei or Bufu ikkan.


Quote:

2) Lately we have heard Sensei talking about the "structure" of the body. This has sparked an analogy of the body being similar to an "I" beam (shoulders/spine/pelvis). I have had some students think about attacking this I beam to take the balance of the Uke.


Nice analogy.

Also looking at more than just the skeleton, by looking at the natural tendencies of the muscles is important for kuzushi and taisabaki.

Quote:

3) Still other student and I have been working on "not being committed" to a technique. The idea that you have to be open to and move from technique to technique as the opportunities present themselves in order to avoid "completing" the technique and having no place else to go. (I didn't explain it well, but if you have been around Sensei I'm sure you can give it a better "principle" word).


I don't know if there is a word for it or not. But, it's probably connected to Bujinkan Zanshin, and Bujinkan kizeme and heijoshin.

Posted on: 2009/7/20 16:19
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Re: Principles
Village Old Timer
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You're talking about 気攻め kizeme, a concept that is more frequently used in kendo practice. Is anyone familiar with Sensei's use of this term in Bujinkan training?

Maintaining 平常心 heijoushin, how is that different from being ready in 残心 zanshin (used in the broader sense of the word), or the exhortation to maintain a state of 万変不驚 banpenfugyou, never being surpised in any circumstances?

Each of these terms encourages us to have ready minds, bodies and spirits. What do you suppose distinguishes each one from the others?

Posted on: 2009/7/20 17:25
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Re: Principles
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Kizeme is used not only in kendo, but several martial arts especially those dealing with kenjutsu.

The bujinkan has a version of it in doing kata. I haven't heard Hatsumi sensei use the term directly but he has talked about it extensively. When he talks about the connection and magnetic attraction and the like.

Posted on: 2009/7/20 17:40
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Re: Principles
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What was the phrase that Soke used in a Daikomyosai that Ben Cole interpreted as "half Assed" - ? Chotto Hanpa? . Later it was decided that it really referred to being "not committed" or "incomplete".

I am away from my notes and cannot recall what is the proper (or improper) Japanese.

Marty

Posted on: 2009/7/20 19:57
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Re: Principles
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One of the things I've been studying since my visit to Japan in May which is related to the half-assed thing (sorry Marty, I am a nihongo functional illiterate) is how the incompleteness, un-commitedness creates the opportunity for the opponent to choose the completion, which presents you with inertia or the energy or whatever that allows you to destroy him (finish destroying his structure). That trip emphasized for me how evolved kyo-jutsu is in Bujinkan. It reminds me of things sensei has said in the past about being zero. Uke gets confused when you don't let him know (with commitment) what is happening - then he perceives apparent safety which is really the path to hell. One of the Shihan made a point about always moving to a neutral place (un-commited) which gives you the ability to then move in the appropriate direction when uke falls for your (non-existent) trap.
Greatgodahmighty I love this stuff! Sorry for babbling.

Posted on: 2009/7/21 2:13
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Re: Principles
Village Old Timer
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中途半端 chuutohanpa, which means not done completely or half-baked.The first two characters can mean "middle way".

Posted on: 2009/7/21 8:40
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Re: Principles
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Quote:

chuutohanpa


Thank You!

Marty

Posted on: 2009/7/21 16:57
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Re: Principles
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Just curious, but does this "half-baked" idea relate to Sensei saying "if you do a perfect technique it will get you killed"?

Posted on: 2009/7/21 21:51
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Re: Principles
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I'll leave all the doing things "half-assed" alone, I just hope people aren't practicing half-assed.

One of the most important things in the the bujinkan, and most martial arts, is proper taisabaki. How well do people understand its importance?
How do people practice it? How much time is spent studying it?

Posted on: 2009/7/27 12:56
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Re: Principles
Village Old Timer
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I drilled the Gray Dojo members on Saturday in tai sabaki. We worked on tai sabaki, taiju ido in response to chudan tsuki. I told them don't worry if you get hit a few times, just work on the sabaki and taiju ido until they get tired.

Is that what you meant by your question?

Posted on: 2009/10/19 8:20
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