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Re: The Most Direct Path
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my 2 cents, the youtube videos of Duncan in the forest, thats just what i would call awesome taijutsu, that path works ...what he says in the article, shows up as visual proof...

Posted on: 2011/4/22 23:31
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Andy D. Cordell
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Re: The Most Direct Path
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acordell wrote:
my 2 cents, the youtube videos of Duncan in the forest, thats just what i would call awesome taijutsu, that path works ...what he says in the article, shows up as visual proof...


Not me. I think that may have been Duncan Stewart.

Posted on: 2011/4/23 0:57
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Re: The Most Direct Path
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acordell wrote:
my 2 cents, the youtube videos of Duncan in the forest, thats just what i would call awesome taijutsu, that path works ...what he says in the article, shows up as visual proof...


Why do you think it's awesome?

Posted on: 2011/4/23 15:27
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Re: The Most Direct Path
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Zenigata wrote:

b. Don't borrow the authority of Hatsumi-sensei and Takamatsu-sensei. Anyway, I don't agree since my understanding is their training being of the type I described in my article. In fact 95% of the training I have done in Japan with my sensei and sempai have been of this sort.


I wasn't borrowing their authority, merely using an example to illustrate my point. For example, I would seriously doubt that a warrior who had to behead people in China wasn't concerned about the combat effectiveness of his art.

People seem to think they are training properly as long as they copy the form correctly, but what's truly important in budo lies not in the form (solely), but where the form is not. Although I do think form is important, it's not the end all be all of our study, nor should it be the only place our concentration and focus lie. If it is, then I believe it becomes a direct path to medocrity.

Thanks,

Posted on: 2011/4/23 22:56
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Jon Haas
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Re: The Most Direct Path
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Thank-you Duncan: seems to make sense and provides food for thought.

If possible, could you expand on point C please?

"c. My view is that a Budoka pursues budo for it's own sake. "


Posted on: 2011/4/24 8:27
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Re: The Most Direct Path
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JonHaas wrote:
People seem to think they are training properly as long as they copy the form correctly, but what's truly important in budo lies not in the form (solely), but where the form is not. Although I do think form is important, it's not the end all be all of our study, nor should it be the only place our concentration and focus lie. If it is, then I believe it becomes a direct path to medocrity.


You are completely missing my point here.


Posted on: 2011/4/24 9:44
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Re: The Most Direct Path
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mcronin wrote:
If possible, could you expand on point C please?
"c. My view is that a Budoka pursues budo for it's own sake. "


Just what I view as a cultural difference here in a Japanese and "western" approach to budo. I am generalising a bit in saying that but I do perceive that difference in thought.

I just think that entering into budo with preconceptions, ambitions, desires, goals, etc you cut yourself off to deeper understanding. I think it is more important to receive, practice and understand until that point of mastery is reached and only then should we start forming our own conclusions.

I think I have at least another 20 years of training before I approach that point. Maybe never.

Posted on: 2011/4/24 10:04
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Re: The Most Direct Path
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Zenigata wrote:
You are completely missing my point here.


Okay. Can you please help me to understand it then? I think the words you used in your post kind of rubbed me the wrong way because you say "good performance of budo". This makes me think of a show - something superficial and lacking depth. It could just be the way you worded it. I'm perfectly willing to admit I misunderstood. :)
Can you expand more on what you mean because I don't think I'm the only one completely missing your point.

Thanks in advance.

Posted on: 2011/4/24 21:50
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Jon Haas
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Re: The Most Direct Path
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Seems if you are looking to use kata in a sparring/fighting scenario you are setting yourself up for failure. From personal experience you wont have time to pre-plan any movement and execute it in real time, at least not against a skilled adversary. If you train the kata, the right portions of the movements will happen when they are supposed to, without thought or decision making. You shouldn't know what you did unless someone records it. Then you will see the kihon in action. In a few situations both friendly and otherwise I have found this to be true. There are faster ways to learn the technique, but they will not bring you to the same level of tactical mastery. It is just like ukemi, when you first learn it, you do it slow, you discover the nuances and your body learns when it is appropriate. If you TRY to do it your timing will be wrong and you will roll yourself into a broken elbow, shoulder, crushed skull, etc...That being said, it is good to include randori practice in your training, even more useful if you do it at someone else's dojo. Don't let your ego get involved and just move and see how you do. If you choke it simply means you need more practice, that you have not absorbed the lessons in the kata. Video yourself, it catches all your sins :)

Posted on: 2011/4/27 10:29
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David Fletcher
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Re: The Most Direct Path
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Apologies for the distraction, however bumped into this sign this morning and it made me smile:

"Excellent technique leads to excellent performance".

Posted on: 2011/4/27 14:52
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