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Re: The Lone Trainer
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Hundreds of dollars for training?? What has happened to ninutsu??

I teach for free in my back yard and often buy lunch afterward. Do these instructors have day jobs??

Charles Daniel

Posted on: 2004/10/29 8:56
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Re: The Lone Trainer
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I don't have a problem with expensive fees as long as they are upfront about it. Hatsumi-sensei told us as an instruction in class once "Don't charge cheap fees or you'll get cheap people." and more importantly "You should charge your students enough to pay for your own training." Each shidoshi needs to collect training materials for study and to get to Japan every year and all this costs money. If the Shidoshi is growing then everyone can grow with him so if everyone pays a bit more then they will be getting something of value for it.

I think it also puts pressure on Shidoshi too. If you are charging a high fee but just spending the money instead of investing in yourself then you are not giving your students any value. I would avoid these sorts of teachers.

The other thing is that high fees can weed out those who are not serious. A story I read in Hiden (the magazine) told of a story from another budo. When the guy started he was being charged so much he could only afford to live on cup noodles every day. After a while his Shihan told him that he looked as if he was struggling so he cut the training fee for him. After a bit longer he cut the fee again and over the course of a few years it was slowly reduced to nothing. On this day the Shihan handed the student a bank passbook in which he had put all the money and it was all given back to the student - with interest. Of course if he had quit he would have never known.

Even though we can never expect to have our fees returned to us I think that story demonstrates something important. Taijutsu cost money because it is something of value and everything you have paid will - eventually - be returned to you with interest.


Posted on: 2004/10/29 11:59
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Re: The Lone Trainer
Village Old Timer
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Quote:

LionsRoar wrote:
Hundreds of dollars for training?? What has happened to ninutsu??

I teach for free in my back yard and often buy lunch afterward. Do these instructors have day jobs??

Charles Daniel


i wish i lived near your back yard!

that is superb, i'm sure many here envy your students.

p.s. i like chicken salt on my chips

Posted on: 2004/10/29 20:00
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darren stewart

Oldschoolcarpentry.com.au
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Re: The Lone Trainer
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That is an interesting story.

At times the fees are okay, but I feel the training recieved needs to reflect what you're paying, at the very least.

Posted on: 2004/10/30 1:09
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Re: The Lone Trainer
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Hi,

I think it is fair to charge for teaching, expecially if the teacher uses that money to train himself and/or travel to Japan. You pay to train, so you charge to teach... it all makes sens!

That said, one must put things in perspective. 200$ per hour...

It cost less to visit you lawyer for a million dollars transaction... actually, it cost less to train in Japan with Soke...

At such a rate, after 30 hours of teaching that instructor has a trip to Japan paid for...

Maybe I am missing something here, but this surely seems exagerated...

You pay for what you want, and if you are happy with that, then good for you. Since you do not seem very experienced in the art, my point is: I am sure you can find similar trainning for cheaper...

Regards,


Posted on: 2004/10/30 1:22
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Re: The Lone Trainer
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Already done, thanks to someone kind enough on this board to let me know of a friend of his in the area.

Posted on: 2004/10/30 23:53
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Re: The Lone Trainer
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I do not see a problem with some training fees. However, an instructor's greed for money should not exceed a student's greed for training.

I think the fees an instructor charges can (in some cases) reflect a very over-developed sense of self-worth. I think a student willing to pay excessive fees needs to step back and ask why they are willing to pour his resources into something that serves only himself. Both can be unbalanced.

You can tell alot about the entire person by the fees he charges. Is ninjutsu his compensation for an otherwise failed life? Is he collecting fees and then donating them? Are you paying for his training because he really believes that a few days in Japan is a replacement for years of hard work (an nice self-serving attitude with no basis in reality)?

The details are very important. Often ninjutsu training makes people over-look the details and that is not the road to improvement.

Posted on: 2004/10/31 0:33
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