Login
Username:

Password:

Remember me



Lost Password?

Register now!
Socialize
 


Browsing this Thread:   1 Anonymous Users



« 1 2 (3) 4 »


Re: bokken making
Village Old Timer
Joined:
2004/2/15 11:25
From oz
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 576
Offline
Quote:

samuraiinc wrote:
this leads me to my next question, what speed should i use with the router,1 being lowest 10 being highest.


that really is a feeling thing, a bit like budo. however too slow will chip, too fast might burn. so play about with the speed until the cut is satisfactory.(probably fastish)


hello papa-san! those amish guy's are increadable! the shihan of carpentry. you are most likely spot on with your assesment, i would however like to put it to the test, i might cut up a blank and whack lumps out of it.

i would be interested to see how they would go steaming a bisento head????? i think glued laminated strips may well be a good alternative. i'm calling my bisento mark I

Posted on: 2005/2/1 16:57
_________________
darren stewart

Oldschoolcarpentry.com.au
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: bokken making
Cant Stay Offline
Joined:
2003/6/13 23:29
From Pennsylvania, USA
Group:
村民 :: Villager
議長 :: Mod
師導士会 :: Shidoshikai
Posts: 1834
Offline
They "steam and bend" most any shape. They make the canes I have, they make "shepards crooks", I've seen some of the most intricate bending and twisting of wood for their horse carriages, it's all pretty amazing. I do get them to make my naganata in which the last 18 inches are steamed and bent and then shaped like the bokken blade. I do think they could handle your bisento too and when it is made of the local hickory, it is very durable.
Ed Martin aka Papa-san

Posted on: 2005/2/5 23:37
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: bokken making
Honorary Villager
Joined:
2004/12/31 18:18
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 33
Offline
um, what about us, all those who leave on the opposite side of the globe? how can we steam bend our home made bokken?

Posted on: 2005/2/6 0:15
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: bokken making
Cant Stay Offline
Joined:
2003/6/13 23:29
From Pennsylvania, USA
Group:
村民 :: Villager
議長 :: Mod
師導士会 :: Shidoshikai
Posts: 1834
Offline
About that I don't know what to tell you except that somebody will have the equipment to do it. You just need to find them. It took me 3 years of looking before I found the people who do the work for me, but once you're in "that circle" you find there are many doing it. A place to start is with people making furniture or any other woodworking, talk to them, ask questions and if they have a posibility follow up on that lead. Good luck.
Ed Martin aka Papa-san

Posted on: 2005/2/7 13:43
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: bokken making
Kutaki Postmaster
Joined:
2004/10/12 22:41
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 200
Offline
I can actually answer a question! heh heh! steam bending a piece of wood is actually pretty simple. All you need is a piece of stove pipe as long as your bokken, a 90degree stove pipe fitting, a pot of water and a heat source. oh and aluminium foil. connect the two pieces of pipe, put the 90 degree fitting end, inside the pot, cover with foil, prop the other end up on something, and cover the pot and the open end of the pipe with tin foil. heat the water to a low boil, and steam the wood for at the least 30 minutes. Pull the bokken to be, out of the pipe(careful it is very hot, and the steam will burn you!)and test its flexibility. the longer you steam it the easier it will bend. after it is bending easily, bend it to the desired shape and hold it there until it cools. of course this will be the hard part, because most likely the wood will be very hot. I recomend that you make a form to clamp the bokken into after you heat it.

and there you have it, steam bending, country boy style!

P.S. this works really well for recurving all wood bows too!

Alan McPherson

Posted on: 2005/2/8 1:57
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: bokken making
Village Old Timer
Joined:
2004/2/15 11:25
From oz
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 576
Offline
thank you!

a couple of questions, do you have to bend the bokken more than you need to allow for 'spring back'? or will it stay the shape you bent it once cool?

could you completely shape the bokken in it's straight state, or will it distort ?

Posted on: 2005/2/8 17:59
_________________
darren stewart

Oldschoolcarpentry.com.au
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: bokken making
Honorary Villager
Joined:
2004/12/31 18:18
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 33
Offline
Hi all,
thanks for all the posts they are very helpfull, I am afraid to ask this because I dont know what the response might be... ( just rememmber that I have started learning only a month ago) but I have to ask this- how important is the curve of a bokken? can I make a curveless bokken or would it affect its durability or my performance with it?
many thanks, avraham.

Posted on: 2005/2/8 20:07
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: bokken making
Cant Stay Offline
Joined:
2003/6/13 23:29
From Pennsylvania, USA
Group:
村民 :: Villager
議長 :: Mod
師導士会 :: Shidoshikai
Posts: 1834
Offline
What an excellent idea Alan!!! I do like your "country-boy" style! As to the question of "bending more for spring back", simply the answer is no. I've watched the Amish on this and they make the proper form. When it is steamed they fasten (clamp) it to the form and let it cool and dry. When that is done they shape it. To shape it first I think would make it more likely to "split" as it was bent. Also on the 'outside' of the bend, the more severe the bend the more necessary it is to put a metal support behind the wood during the bending. If they don't do that on the cane handle it will split the wood apart and it won't work. Once it is bent to the proper shape and dried (and cool) then shape it. As to the question on practicing with a straight blade and its strength. First you should be able to use ANY shape effectively --- our art teaches that. But if you want to learn the techniques of the normal sword then you do need the curved blade. There are techniques we use that depend on the curve. On the "strength" since the grain is straight it will be quite strong depending on the wood you use, I do recomend hickory or white oak, do stay away from the soft woods of pine, fur, etc. as they WILL shatter with use. Good luck with your experiments!
Ed Martin aka Papa-san

Posted on: 2005/2/8 23:53
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: bokken making
Occasional Visitor
Joined:
2005/1/29 7:57
From Ontario, Canada
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 9
Offline
id like to say the idea of steam bending with a kettle and a pipe seems pretty silly to me. the wood would most likely split and almost definitely warp unless you had it clamped down during steaming and then used a jig to bend it on. although i dont know the first thing about aikido or any techniques for katana, i do enjoy the very fun hobby of making bokkens. using my methods i am able to make bokkens that can stand up to regular use. me and my brother use these 2 with minor errors that i made, and they havent broken or cracked, theres a few dents of course. i think making bokkens is something you need to figure out for yourself as it is an art in itself. if your bokken wasnt unique then why didnt you save yourself the trouble and buy one.i am curious to know how the amish shape the bokken if you could elaborate on that,since they dont use power tools or anything.

Posted on: 2005/2/9 8:35
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: bokken making
Cant Stay Offline
Joined:
2003/6/13 23:29
From Pennsylvania, USA
Group:
村民 :: Villager
議長 :: Mod
師導士会 :: Shidoshikai
Posts: 1834
Offline
Actually all the steaming does is make the wood flexible enough to bend, there is no stress on the wood and so no reason for it to split. I suppose you could do the same thing if you emersed the wood in water for a long time, it would eventuall become so soaked that it could be bent. I do agree, (and so do the Amish as that's what they do) that a jig should be used and the wood clamped to it until it dries completely. It will then hold that shape.
On the use of "power" tools, it's very interesting with the Amish, they DO use power in their work-shops, not in the homes, but in the work shop. Now on this I'm guessing, but my evaluation is that the work shop is "business" and their church understands it is necessary to "compete" and so "power" is permitted. If that is so, I find it very interesting. There are power saws, a long wide belt sander,(the belt is at least 10 feet long and 6 inches wide)routers, drills, etc. They do turn out some incredible work!
Ed Martin aka Papa-san

Posted on: 2005/2/9 22:46
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer



« 1 2 (3) 4 »




[Advanced Search]


Today's Sponsor