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How to become a "good" student?
Villager
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In the thread about being a good Uke, George asked if we should be learning how to become a good student in order to do what the instructor is showing.

So, the question is this:
What particular tools or methods do you use to give your students (or yourself) the ABILITIES to emulate the type of movement from a high-level instructor?

For instance; Soke demonstrates the ability to move smoothly and well-balanced in every direction, it looks very "soft", yet he is always poised to "explode", if you will.

So what do you do to develope this movement? Or any other factor necessary to be able to actually do what Soke (or any high-level instructor)is doing?

Rob

Posted on: 2005/5/6 11:35
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Re: How to become a "good" student?
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sometimes i find that i watch a tech being shown and think that i have seen what was being shown properly but when i comes my turn to do that technique i find myself going `huh?` and looking around the class to see what others are doing.
when im watching i always try to see whats going on with feet position and what the hands are doing and the effect on the uke but it doesnt allways seem to sink in straight away and it kind of makes me feel a bit slow sometimes .
im pretty sure other people have this problem or maybe did when they were a beginner like myself so i was just wondering if anyone has tips on remembering what was just shown.
thanks in advance.

Posted on: 2005/5/6 15:17
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Re: How to become a "good" student?
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You train.

Posted on: 2005/5/6 15:17
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Re: How to become a "good" student?
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well yeah...

Posted on: 2005/5/6 15:19
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Re: How to become a "good" student?
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Quote:

ninjalex wrote:
You train.


How?

Posted on: 2005/5/6 15:20
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Re: How to become a "good" student?
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by training the way you normally do. in class, learn the techniques and learn to be a good uke and tori. and at home do your sanshin, ukemi, suburi.. whatever you do to become better.. the rest will come by itself; well thats what i think. its just like the saki test, i remember reading in a book by Hatsumi sensei that you cant exactly train your 6th sense, it comes naturally with all your training and experience.
anyways thats how i see it. am i wrong?

Posted on: 2005/5/6 15:37
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Re: How to become a "good" student?
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Quote:

ninjalex wrote:
by training the way you normally do. in class, learn the techniques and learn to be a good uke and tori. and at home do your sanshin, ukemi, suburi.. whatever you do to become better.. the rest will come by itself; well thats what i think. its just like the saki test, i remember reading in a book by Hatsumi sensei that you cant exactly train your 6th sense, it comes naturally with all your training and experience.
anyways thats how i see it. am i wrong?


Well that's not very specific is it? Kind of like saying "get smarter; you know read stuff, learn things". not really helpful

Rob

Posted on: 2005/5/6 16:23
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Re: How to become a "good" student?
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I cant get more specific than that. Hopefully, some people understood what i meant. Someone asked a question and I answered in the simplest way possible.. sure I could have written a long text on martial arts with quotes and stories involved, you know..the whole shabang! I just didnt find that necessary.
Like our parents say when we are young: someday, youll understand!

gambatte!

Posted on: 2005/5/6 17:54
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Re: How to become a "good" student?
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Quote:

duckman wrote:

sometimes i find that i watch a tech being shown and think that i have seen what was being shown properly but when i comes my turn to do that technique i find myself going `huh?` and looking around the class to see what others are doing.


This happens to me about half of the time when we are in class. If I am struggling or I can not help my partner when they struggle, I raise my hand and ask our instructor for assistance / clarification.

What has always helped me the most is to solo practice the basics of what our instructors show us. At home when solo training, I focus on ukemi, kamae balance and sanshin.

30 minutes a day helps my in-class time become more enlightening and rewarding. I think this so because I am more comfortable with the basics and can pay more attention to the new stuff (for me). I have to train based on feeling because my memory is poor (or full?).

Posted on: 2005/5/6 21:43
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Re: How to become a "good" student?
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yes our instructor does that aswell ... would be good to be relying my own eyes more than looking to what other people picked up though i think.
it doesnt happen as often as it used too just usually towards the end of class after being worn down a bit.

Posted on: 2005/5/6 21:59
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