Login
Username:

Password:

Remember me



Lost Password?

Register now!
Socialize
 

Recent Topics
Topic Replies Last Post
Wedding gift... can someone help me to translate it? 6 2018/6/30 20:50
Barga18
Aomori-Ken 0 2018/6/19 10:27
hanzo-tou
Certificates 0 2018/5/8 4:34
schistkicker
Home Project: Shadowbox 3 2018/4/25 21:44
roufus
Ichiba 0 2018/2/21 1:18
Dpinga

Browsing this Thread:   1 Anonymous Users



« 1 (2)


Re: Frustrations of Training Alone
Permanent Village Fixture
Joined:
2004/12/16 1:39
Group:
Gaijin (Inactive)
Posts: 303
Offline
Quote:

MrFranco wrote:


I disagree whole heartedly. In the begining you should not mix up your training with other styles or you will get "mixed up". Learning our arts takes time to engrain our type of movement into our bodies.



I disagree with you MrFranco, I think mixed training is good. I think we should all cross-train mixing schools such as Gyokko Ryu with Shinden Fudo Ryu. We should also mix in some Kukishiden Ryu and lots of weapons work from those schools.

Of course to "mix it up" we can always train in some Togakure Ryu, or perhaps some Takagi Yoshin Ryu...

MMA! That's us....

Posted on: 2006/8/19 2:05
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Frustrations of Training Alone
Just Passing Through
Joined:
2006/8/5 3:30
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 3
Offline
I believe MrFranco's notion was that when one is first learning a martial art - any martial art - it's best to stick with just the one art to learn the techniques and their complex relationships to each other. Taijutsu's footwork and and striking (for example) are best learned together. Once the dynamic between the intra-art techniques are mastered and the nuances ingrained, then one can test/adapt to other styles (which is surely beneficial at that point). There is a worry that if one cross-trains too early, one may pick up (to use an over-simplified example) elements of, say, tsing-i footwork and inadvertently fuse them with taijutsu striking in one's mind, to the detriment of both arts.

Again, this is merely conjecture based on what MrFranco wrote, and I should say that I don't feel qualified to (dis)agree in either direction, nor am I attempting to.

Posted on: 2006/8/19 5:03
_________________
I still find each day too short for all the thoughts I want to think, all the walks I want to take, all the books I want to read, and all the friends I want to see.
~John Burroughs
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Frustrations of Training Alone
Permanent Village Fixture
Joined:
2004/12/16 1:39
Group:
Gaijin (Inactive)
Posts: 303
Offline
Quote:

single_step wrote:
I believe MrFranco's notion was that when one is first learning a martial art - any martial art - it's best to stick with just the one art to learn the techniques and their complex relationships to each other. Taijutsu's footwork and and striking (for example) are best learned together. Once the dynamic between the intra-art techniques are mastered and the nuances ingrained, then one can test/adapt to other styles (which is surely beneficial at that point). There is a worry that if one cross-trains too early, one may pick up (to use an over-simplified example) elements of, say, tsing-i footwork and inadvertently fuse them with taijutsu striking in one's mind, to the detriment of both arts.

Again, this is merely conjecture based on what MrFranco wrote, and I should say that I don't feel qualified to (dis)agree in either direction, nor am I attempting to.


I was merely being "ironic".

Posted on: 2006/8/19 14:01
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Frustrations of Training Alone
Just Passing Through
Joined:
2006/8/5 3:30
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 3
Offline
well i guess that shows exactly how unqualified i am to comment on the topic, as i completely missed the point


if you need me, i'll be in the non-bujinkan section, working on my embarassed smileys

Posted on: 2006/8/20 2:20
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Frustrations of Training Alone
Kutaki Postmaster
Joined:
2003/7/29 6:25
From Los Angeles
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 169
Offline
Quote:

single_step wrote:
I believe MrFranco's notion was that when one is first learning a martial art - any martial art - it's best to stick with just the one art to learn the techniques and their complex relationships to each other. Taijutsu's footwork and and striking (for example) are best learned together. Once the dynamic between the intra-art techniques are mastered and the nuances ingrained, then one can test/adapt to other styles (which is surely beneficial at that point). There is a worry that if one cross-trains too early, one may pick up (to use an over-simplified example) elements of, say, tsing-i footwork and inadvertently fuse them with taijutsu striking in one's mind, to the detriment of both arts.

Again, this is merely conjecture based on what MrFranco wrote, and I should say that I don't feel qualified to (dis)agree in either direction, nor am I attempting to.


Thank you. This is exactly what I meant.

Quote:
I know that I said I was training alone, but it feels like it even though I am training with another.


In the end you must train on your own in order to develope your own skill and advance your level. I'm sure that because you trained in Japan you were able to learn fundmantals (kicking, punching, ukemi, San Shin, Kihon...). As long as you train to develope these skills you should be able to advance in your skills.

Posted on: 2006/8/21 15:06
_________________
Mark Franco
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Frustrations of Training Alone
Villager
Joined:
2006/8/12 10:11
From Grove City, Ohio
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 52
Offline
I personally believe 4 1/2 hours of "silent kiai's" is all it takes to whoop some ars!



Sean Snyder

Posted on: 2006/8/24 12:30
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Unsubscribed
Re: Frustrations of Training Alone
Deleted_Unsubscribed
Try switching between being armed and unarmed for all of your ukemi, san shin, and some of the kihon happo. Doing ukemi with a bokken and shoto, or with a roku shaku bo, changes a lot of the dynamic. Also consider how to find new directions for kamae. Learn how things change when you practice hicho in eight differnet directions. Ground kamae for shinden fudo ryu are great self-training exercises.

For physical training, go to the local sports store and find some ankle and wrist weights (nothing heavy, just an extra pound or two). Then practice kamae, san shin, striking, blocking, then take the weights off and do it again. Then put on heavy boots or winter clothing and do the same thing again.

Bottom line is that you're restricted only by your imagination. That said, you need to travel periodically during the year to some place where you can find an instructor and uke.

My two cents....

Posted on: 2006/8/25 11:34
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer



« 1 (2)




[Advanced Search]


Today's Sponsor