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Seeking a Master
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Hello, My name is Tony I left a topic a while ago tring to find a school in japan... Well now I'm looking for just a master one that may take me as an apprentice. No im not asking for Hatsumi to (although i would like that ). Just any one who has mastered Ninjitsu to a Degree and who could train me to instructor. I am currently just working for money and would like to be able to pay and then train and only train... I'm not looking for somone who will teach me 2-3 times a week... but someone who I can train with daily and who can guide me.
Thank you for your time

- Tony

Posted on: 2005/10/21 13:29
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Re: Seeking a Master
Deleted_
Hi Tony!

First of all I am glad to see you are so commited to this art! Everyone would love to be an apprentice of one of the japanese shihan, unfortunatly this goal is somewhat hard to attain. It would be great to be able to only eat sleep and train, but the unfortunate fact is that the Bujinkan is often a very expensive art. If you want to be a student of a "master" in japan then you must go to japan and train with them, but do not expect them to "take you under their wing", as it were, or show you any sort of special treatment.
I am sure that there are many skilled people in your own area that can teach you just as much if you are new to this art. If you want to train everyday that is great, usually that just means you have to travel a little farther than you would like because most dojos only train about 3 days a week.
If it is your goal to go to Japan and train with the "masters" that is great! There are many people who would love to do this. Just do not expect anyone to take you on as an apprentice until you have really stuck with it a few years. Even then, it is unlikely that you will be able to stop working and just train. I think that having to balance work, family, and training is a big part of the development of any martial artist. I am sure there are a lot of shihan who feel the same way. So, stick with it! Maybe you will find the balance between life and training that you are looking for right under your feet.

Keep going!

Posted on: 2005/10/21 14:01
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Re: Seeking a Master
Honorary Villager
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I am aware of this and I dont care where I have to travel. I did find this place in China that teaches the Shaolin Kung Fu that would be perfect (www.Shaolins.com) only that it is not ninjitsu. I have already put a year in ninjitsu (both self study and a few scatterd lessons) and I do not want to stray away... The only problem with me going to Japan is I just graduated from High School and more than likely would not be able to make it on my own there... I am barley doing so here but if a chance ever opend for me I would gladly take it. More than likely if I could find a place to stay until I'm on my feet there I would give it a try...

Posted on: 2005/10/21 14:11
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Re: Seeking a Master
Kutaki Postmaster
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2004/9/1 17:21
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Quote:

Akoni wrote:
... The only problem with me going to Japan is I just graduated from High School and more than likely would not be able to make it on my own there... I am barley doing so here but if a chance ever opend for me I would gladly take it. More than likely if I could find a place to stay until I'm on my feet there I would give it a try...


My advice for you, seeing as how youve just finished High School, would be to gain some real world experience first. Learn to stand on your own 2 feet and be self sufficient (which, by your own admission, you are having problems with. And also, by the way, was also one of the defining attributes of the Ninja of old !)

Maybe further your studies in an area that may help you gain employment in Japan when you are finally ready to make the move. While you are still at home in your comfort zone, prepare yourself. Study Japanese. Maybe take up a career in teaching. Teaching English maybe. Science..... anyhting that may give you an edge in employment in another country such as Japan. Give yourself a realistic time frame and goal, and work to achieve it, i.e 3 to 4 yrs or so......... (and in that time work hard to achieve the goals so you get closer to finally making the move)

The important thig is "Dont be in a hurry". While you are preparing yourself, start you Bujinkan training with an Instructor local to where you currently are, so that your basics are polished when you do make the move. Maybe also PM or email some of the more experienced guys who are members here on Kutaki, who have lived in Japan. Milk them for their knowledge. Im sure that they would only be too happy to help you out.

Hope this advice helps you.





Posted on: 2005/10/22 2:03
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Shane O'Brien
Australia
Position = Submission; -- Shuto therapy, shut up & train; -- Armchair warriors ? Nintendo Ryu, the next big craze.
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Re: Seeking a Master
Kutaki Postmaster
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2004/9/2 0:26
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Tony,

This is not criticism of you and please don't take it as such but I think you have the Hollywood-ninja image in your mind.

I suggest reading The Way of the Ninja to enrich yourself on the topic of the true art and its nature.

-Jibran

Posted on: 2005/10/22 2:19
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Re: Seeking a Master
Deleted_
(Looks like Shane beat me to it! Very good advice. I wrote this before reading your reply. JINX!)


If you are fresh out of high school and do not speak Japanese and are financially challenged I would not recommend getting a one way ticket to Japan.

I will offer some advice because I felt the same way when I was at this stage in your life (Not so long ago!).
If you really are serious about your training then think about this:
In ninpo you can’t learn very much if all you do is train. There are many, many important lessons to learn about surviving that you won’t learn in the dojo. This is very important. You have to be able to survive on your own. Eventually all time will become time spent training. There is no line between training in ninpo and living your life. I would get a job, join a dojo, and pursue some type of education. The best thing to judge someone’s progress in this art is to look at their life and determine how successful they are, and how happy the people who depend upon them are, and by success I do not mean financial success, but whole life success. Think long and hard about that before you dive.

Posted on: 2005/10/22 2:19
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Re: Seeking a Master
Kutaki Postmaster
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Quote:

Addam wrote:
(Looks like Shane beat me to it! Very good advice. I wrote this before reading your reply. JINX!)


Danmmit, now i cant speak until you say my name three times......................

Must now resort to Navy Seal hand signals, lol.

Posted on: 2005/10/22 2:32
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Shane O'Brien
Australia
Position = Submission; -- Shuto therapy, shut up & train; -- Armchair warriors ? Nintendo Ryu, the next big craze.
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Re: Seeking a Master
Permanent Village Fixture
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2004/12/16 1:39
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Quote:

Addam wrote:



I will offer some advice because I felt the same way when I was at this stage in your life (Not so long ago!).
If you really are serious about your training then think about this:
In ninpo you can’t learn very much if all you do is train. There are many, many important lessons to learn about surviving that you won’t learn in the dojo. This is very important. You have to be able to survive on your own. Eventually all time will become time spent training. There is no line between training in ninpo and living your life. I would get a job, join a dojo, and pursue some type of education. The best thing to judge someone’s progress in this art is to look at their life and determine how successful they are, and how happy the people who depend upon them are, and by success I do not mean financial success, but whole life success. Think long and hard about that before you dive.


Adam,

This was quite a well-written and wonderful reply. After reading it I realized you said things that apply to many other threads on this board, and our art in general.

I hope you get a karma point for it, you deserve it.


Posted on: 2005/10/22 4:45
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Re: Seeking a Master
Honorary Villager
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2005/8/12 21:34
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Quote:

Nighthawke wrote:
Quote:

Akoni wrote:
... The only problem with me going to Japan is I just graduated from High School and more than likely would not be able to make it on my own there... I am barley doing so here but if a chance ever opend for me I would gladly take it. More than likely if I could find a place to stay until I'm on my feet there I would give it a try...


My advice for you, seeing as how youve just finished High School, would be to gain some real world experience first. Learn to stand on your own 2 feet and be self sufficient (which, by your own admission, you are having problems with. And also, by the way, was also one of the defining attributes of the Ninja of old !)

Maybe further your studies in an area that may help you gain employment in Japan when you are finally ready to make the move. While you are still at home in your comfort zone, prepare yourself. Study Japanese. Maybe take up a career in teaching. Teaching English maybe. Science..... anyhting that may give you an edge in employment in another country such as Japan. Give yourself a realistic time frame and goal, and work to achieve it, i.e 3 to 4 yrs or so......... (and in that time work hard to achieve the goals so you get closer to finally making the move)

The important thig is "Dont be in a hurry". While you are preparing yourself, start you Bujinkan training with an Instructor local to where you currently are, so that your basics are polished when you do make the move. Maybe also PM or email some of the more experienced guys who are members here on Kutaki, who have lived in Japan. Milk them for their knowledge. Im sure that they would only be too happy to help you out.

Hope this advice helps you.




It's not that I'm having a hard time getting money. I recently had an accedent, cuasing me to lose a bit of money. In the course of 2 months I had saved around $3000, lol well now im at 172. Thats life, it happens. So its not that I dont have the money. I also have been attending classes for a year in Bujikan ninjitsu and I also have had Master Van Donks home study course 2 years befor that. As for the Person who believes I have the "Hollywood ninja" in mind you are mistaken I am fully aware of the history and traits of the ninja but, I do thank you for your cuation

Posted on: 2005/10/22 5:11
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Re: Seeking a Master
Active Kutakian
Joined:
2003/2/2 14:01
From New York
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Akoni (Tony),

Quote:
I also have been attending classes for a year in Bujikan ninjitsu and I also have had Master Van Donks home study course 2 years befor that


Cool. I recommend that since you are involved in a Bujinkan class ask your teacher for some guidance. I'm not saying that to brush you off - but rather because no one here (on this forum) knows you better than your instructor? Perhaps s/he goes to Japan annually and wouldn't mind your going along (when you are financially able), too.

In the meantime, I recommend learning some Japanese and reading all of Hatsumi Soke's books a few times (I always get more insight to a book the second/third time around).

Finally, study well what you are learning in class.

Regards,
Joe

Posted on: 2005/10/22 6:58
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Joe Maurantonio, shidoshi
Bujinkan New York Dojo
Ninpo: Wisdom for Life by Hatsumi Sensei
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