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Re: Reading List and DVDs
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A list of books that are good include:
Simon Yeo's Nijutsu: Secret Fighting Arts of the Ninja
Hatsumi Masaaki's
*Unarmed Fighting Techniques of the Samurai
*Way of the Ninja
*Ninjutsu: The Nine Traditions

I am also a beginer and each of the books are full of information Simon Yeo's book explains basics of Bujinkan in an easily understandable way and also helps teach principles. Unarmed Fighting Techniques of the Samurai and
Way of the Ninja have good information, you need to understand the basics to understand the techniques shown.
Ninjutsu: The Nine Traditions this book explains history of the art and is a good reference for any student.



Posted on: 2010/10/1 8:28
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Re: Reading List and DVDs
Kutaki Postmaster
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As a beginner, I'd have to point out that "Unarmed Fighting Techniques" is effectively useless for the beginner as none of it makes sense unless you already have studied thoroughly the waza under discussion.

Just my two yen.

Posted on: 2010/10/2 3:00
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Re: Reading List and DVDs
Kutaki Postmaster
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Quote:

jibran wrote:
As a beginner, I'd have to point out that "Unarmed Fighting Techniques" is effectively useless for the beginner as none of it makes sense unless you already have studied thoroughly the waza under discussion.

Just my two yen.


It is not only useless for beginners.

When a version appears on DVD/BlueRay, it will be far more useful. I think books have pretty much had their day when it comes to physical instruction, especially with all the translation errors and rumours that some of these are deliberate.

Too much?

Posted on: 2010/10/2 20:22
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Re: Reading List and DVDs
Kutaki Postmaster
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I think the book is far from useless. If Bujinkan Budo Taijutsu were a college course, Unarmed Fighting Techniques would be the textbook. Just like any textbook, its value is marginal without the class that it supports. Textbooks also contain errors and omissions. Its an excellent reference.

Posted on: 2010/10/6 2:06
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Re: Reading List and DVDs
Kutaki Postmaster
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Quote:

sschmidt wrote:
I think the book is far from useless. If Bujinkan Budo Taijutsu were a college course, Unarmed Fighting Techniques would be the textbook. Just like any textbook, its value is marginal without the class that it supports. Textbooks also contain errors and omissions. Its an excellent reference.

Agreed. My point is that, as an absolute beginner, I've not studied nearly enough to get use out of the book yet.

Posted on: 2010/10/6 6:36
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Re: Reading List and DVDs
Kutaki Postmaster
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I've had an idea for some time, based on my occupational background in 'training' and pertaining to competency assessment in which I produce an Excel Spreadsheet based on the TCJRNM or this book, or both, or eventually build something with all the weaponry waza and kata also, and to use it for myself and in future for any students, to monitor how well I feel I know the bits and pieces that make up our system.

For example, a technique such as Gekkan (I only chose this because we worked on it recently) would be on one axis and there might be a number of levels for how I feel I or a student knows the technique, ranging from 'Has been shown', through 'has rudimentary awareness/understanding of', 'can perform the basic form', 'can explain the basic form', 'can perform henka/application of form', 'is highly competent and ready to seek guidance from a higher level instructor' etc.

Does anyone else use anything like this, over and above a basic syllabus or rank structure?

Posted on: 2010/10/6 9:29
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Re: Reading List and DVDs
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I don't use one personally, but I've known many different MA teachers who use a rubric style grading process for each thing tested. I've seen a 1 to 5 scoring, where the total needs to be at a certain level, to a simple categorical grid similar to what you described.

Whatever the technique, if they are testing for a rank higher than the one such technique is listed for, then there should be an expectation of having a higher ability in performing it.

I personally don't use such a system, having discarded formal structure long ago for a process more customized to the individual's natural ability, etc.

Of course, kihon is still more important that any number of techniques... Quality is far more important than quantity. That's what I evaluate.

Posted on: 2010/10/6 10:36
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Re: Reading List and DVDs
Kutaki Postmaster
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Of course kihon is always key, and being graded myself for general/natural ability, or 'feeling' as the much maligned mystical nature of generic BBT is often labelled, I am not suggesting formalising mine or others' training, but merely having an up-to-date detailed quick reference guide as to where I/we am/are at. And it would have to be a scale of at least 1 to 10 to allow for downward as well as upward progression!

It might also help to plan training, to work on areas not recently examined or where weaknesses need to be addressed.

Posted on: 2010/10/6 14:01
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Re: Reading List and DVDs
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Quote:

ElfTengu wrote:
I produce an Excel Spreadsheet ...... to monitor how well I feel I know the bits and pieces that make up our system.



I think we all come up with some method of going through the Ryuha and the Ten Chi Jin. At some point in time, we realize that our desire to break the art down into a "system" of reproducible steps not as easy as we thought. The art part is much more vague. What is frustrating to many is the relative lack of direction and specificity provided from above. The same "lack of direction" is also what gives us the freedom to figure things out from our own perspective.

In the end it becomes an ability to control your attitude and movements that makes us Bujinkan.

Marty

Posted on: 2010/10/6 21:57
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Re: Reading List and DVDs
Kutaki Postmaster
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Quote:

For example, a technique such as Gekkan (I only chose this because we worked on it recently) would be on one axis and there might be a number of levels for how I feel I or a student knows the technique .....

Does anyone else use anything like this, over and above a basic syllabus or rank structure?


In the past I've attempted similar things but I found that while it fulfilled my desire to categorize things and quantify my knowledge, it ended up being a meaningless exercise for me and ultimately a waste of time.

For example, my definition of being "proficient" with a technique 5 years ago was WAY different from my definition of "proficient" now, so any attempt to quantify proficiency 5 years ago would have no meaning for me today. 5 years ago I actually thought I was starting to get things, but now I have no such illusion.




Posted on: 2010/10/6 23:29
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