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Small thought on movement
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Moving the following from the thread located at:

http://www.kutaki.org/modules/newbb/v ... pic_id=3324&forum=6&type=

-----

Observations and thoughts:::


The thing I find about Shinden Fudo Ryu - and all movement withing budo;


There is always movement. When you watch the videos posted in the original first post in this thread you can see that in all the movements, while they are broken down into steps for training purposes - the actual movements are specifically unified movements from the center of the Hips.

with the actual steering point slightly below and behind the Sacrum (maybe thats where we get fulcrum)

When we talk about the Immovable Heart - we are talking about the ability to ACT in the face of any situation. Free from the limitations imposed by fear, free from hesitation's destructive affect on timing.

Truly the conscious operating from intrinsic connection to source.

When you begin to see and embody the mastery of movement within Budo/Bujinkan/Taijutsu - you begin to realize how infinitely reflected the entire universe is in your finite presence.

When I previously used to contemplate the "now" I was always fooled into thinking the Now was a stand-still moment. The Present.

Now is Always.

I am Always Moving
I am Always Healing
I am Always Learning
I am Always manifesting infinity
I am ALWAYS now.

Now is simply all things (moving, healing, learning, etc) rolled up in the ALL WAYS.

Now is.

Always is what it is to Be.

Posted on: 2007/2/13 7:18
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Re: Small thought on movement
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I interpret the immovable heart as something like that too. If you are faced with conflict and you resist, you are immovable (maybe), but somewhat limited in what you are able to do. If you are faced with conflict and flow with it (ukemi) and re-direct and guide it, then you're not moving on someone elses wishes, but your own. If you keep moving you are immovable because there is potential for many things. Maybe this is why Soke suggests we "keep going".

I also interpret the seated posture Fedozah in a similar matter. Translated it means 'the immovable seat' - but literally it's quite unstable. However the sheer variety it offers in the event of being confronted or pushed over makes it immovable. With proper ukemi you're able to do a variety of things in retaliation using the energy presented. Like, "you may push me but you'll end up with a face full of foot - and it will have been from your doing".

...or maybe not. I think I need to shut up and train.

Posted on: 2007/2/14 23:44
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Re: Small thought on movement
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Sorry to be asking, but might it be more likely Uke-nagashi, than Ukemi, when there's flowing in the equation?

PS. Fudôza, unmoveable sitting

Posted on: 2007/2/15 6:45
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Re: Small thought on movement
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I'm too low ranking to know :p

Also my "immovable opinion" is easily swayed by common sense.

^__^

Posted on: 2007/2/16 9:41
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Re: Small thought on movement
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Quote:

Yamazu wrote:
Sorry to be asking, but might it be more likely Uke-nagashi, than Ukemi, when there's flowing in the equation?


i too am not as informed as many among us, but understood ukemi to be "breakfall" or similar, and as such implies a flow, in that it reduces the impact by improving the roll, or flow, of the body on contact with the ground (or surface).

however, I do understand that the principles of Uke-nagashi are to do with re-directing another's energies, or force, and so may well fit the bill better in this context than ukemi.

context is everything (training is even more)

Posted on: 2007/2/16 10:32
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Re: Small thought on movement
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Quote:

toby1 wrote:
i too am not as informed as many among us, but understood ukemi to be "breakfall" or similar, and as such implies a flow, in that it reduces the impact by improving the roll, or flow, of the body on contact with the ground (or surface).

however, I do understand that the principles of Uke-nagashi are to do with re-directing another's energies, or force, and so may well fit the bill better in this context than ukemi.

context is everything (training is even more)


I'm not a total Japanese linguistic scholar, but from my fuzzy gaijin interpretations (flavored with my Bujinkan experience), this is what I've learned:

At a beginning level this is how you first would understand ukemi. But, actually, 'ukemi' has more to do with "receiving" than breakfalls in a technical sense. It's like trying to catch a fast pitch baseball with your bare hands - you use timing and a flowing method that takes reduces the impact to enable you to catch the ball without injury.

In breakfalling, you are doing the same thing - you receive the ground in a relationship that reduces the chance of injury to yourself and allows you to continue your technique.

But, you could also say the same thing for all of taijutsu. Hell, even life itself...

The term 'uke' also has to do with 'receiving', but in a different sense. So, to be an 'uke' is to 'receive' a technique.

So, it depends on the context. Are you 'receiving' and/or 'catching'? Is your intent at that moment to avoid injury from the direct force of the technique? If it's to 'reverse' the intent/direction/force/motion, then that would be a 'gyaku', since 'gyaku' actually means reversal - not 'wrist twist' or other technical term commonly associated with it.

Posted on: 2007/2/17 1:34
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Re: Small thought on movement
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I believe that the “immovable heart” can be likened to the mental/emotional state referred to as “mind of no mind” or “empty mind”. The immovable heart is one that is free of distractions like doubt, expectation, or unnecessary thought that lead to the physical conditions that prevent or hinder one from acting appropriately such as hesitation or tension of any kind. A mind that is quiet and still--free of conscious thoughts of the seemingly separate elements of a movement or series of movements is ready and open to receive. The immovable heart cannot be pulled out of the harmony of its center by external conditions, no matter how dire they appear. It is an attitude that lies balanced between activity and passivity—between tension and relaxation. It does not strive; it does not clash. The immovable heart is free from fear and its myriad manifestations. This is void--the stance that is all stances. It takes many lifetimes to achieve, and should not be underrated. Achieving constant stillness within is a most important aim.



Ayam|mayA

Posted on: 2007/2/22 8:37
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Re: Small thought on movement
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Great comment Ayam|mayA. That is one to print.

In a kind of Zen koan, Soho said that a heart that never stops moving is the immovable heart. Once the heart stops on something, it is no longer immovable. I have a base undersdanding of what he means, but there is a lot there to think about.

Jeff

Posted on: 2007/2/22 11:25
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Re: Small thought on movement
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Quote:

Shinobiko wrote:
Great comment Ayam|mayA. That is one to print.

In a kind of Zen koan, Soho said that a heart that never stops moving is the immovable heart. Once the heart stops on something, it is no longer immovable. I have a base undersdanding of what he means, but there is a lot there to think about.


This means that when you are completely present, completely one with all things then there is no longer "you", nothing remains but the awareness of life ever-changing. You ARE as they say "the eyes of god". In this awareness, "you" cannot be moved because there is no "you" - there is just the ever present awareness of life. How can that be moved at all!!

The second you attach onto something or grasp something, then there is a "you" that is attaching to "something". In this moment you become, and by becoming you have stopped being present with the truth of life - the awareness of life ever-changing. From here you can be moved because there is a you.

I hope that helps explain it briefly. If you want me to go into more detail about this let me know, I can go as into as much detail as you like.

Posted on: 2007/2/22 19:10
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Re: Small thought on movement
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Thank you Jeff! I like the koan.

As I’m sure you’re aware, the “empty mind” is analogous to an empty vessel. I picture a stream of energy/thought/consciousness continually flowing through this “vessel”. Naturally the attachments of the ego would seem to hamper this movement, but I would venture to say that this movement never stops no matter what I do. Let’s say the conscious mind is the “I” watching the flow of said stream while thought in the form of various flotsam drifts by. I might pick up a water-smoothed tree limb to examine. Perhaps my full attention is on the wood, and during that moment all I’m conscious of is this one piece of driftwood; meanwhile, the stream continues to flow as before. I’m just not conscious of all the information flowing through, but that’s okay because my subconscious always is. The state of “emptiness” is simply when the conscious mind is quiet enough to allow the subconscious to act on the ever-changing totality of the information being received. This is evidenced by a technique that one is trying to nail, but one is stymied by one’s inability to stop thinking about it. “Just DO it!” my sensei would emphatically say with a look on his face that brooked no further hesitation.



Ed

Posted on: 2007/2/23 4:21
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