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Re: My criterion for selecting a teacher or mentor.
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Quote:

鬼 wrote:
Quote:

Yamazu wrote:
Quote:

Boggs wrote:
...but if the teacher can't actually make the stuff work then they are not worth your trouble.



...and how does one find that out, then?



Could please explain a little more on what you mean. Who is to find out what exactly?.

The "making it work" part...

EDIT: added "one"

Posted on: 2007/5/15 20:08
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Re: My criterion for selecting a teacher or mentor.
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I was bored and browsing the site and so I thought I would be productive and add my two cents. Here goes...

I own a martial arts school that has a summer camp starting on the 18th. I will be working from seven a.m. until, at times, eight thirty p.m. Monday through Friday. We've only been open for a year in August, but I have worked at a martial arts school since about '03 or '04, so I have done this before. :) Therefore, the instructor in question makes a large difference if I am going to take classes.

I want someone knowledgeable. Not someone that can only perform the technique one way, but can show me variations depending on the situation. I teach American Kenpo, so we're all about the variations on a move or technique. What happens if they punch? What happens if they step back instead of forward? Move at a 45 degree angle instead of straight forward? That sort of thing.

I want someone friendly. I have had abusive instructors and as an instructor myself, I try to be open with the students. Teaching is one thing, abusing is another. Show a move works, move on. No one is impressed that you can cause pain - we knew you could in the beginning... that's why we signed up. :P

I want someone that isn't in it to draw things out. I will be a committed student whether or not it takes me a while to progress so long as I feel I am learning. On flip side, if I am getting a move well, please don't hold me back because there is a recommended length of time a person should stay in a kyu. That's like saying someone that has a genius IQ in high school shouldn't be allowed to skip grades or progress faster than others his age. Holding someone back is no fun. I don't do it to my students. If someone has the ability, I allow it to shine. That, of course, is not to say I am a genius in the martial arts. FAR from it. :) Just an analogy.

Anyway to sum things up, I want someone REAL. Those are my criteria.

Yeah. Enough rambling. If you've gotten to the end of this post, thanks for suffering.

Shawn

Posted on: 2007/6/12 10:51
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Re: My criterion for selecting a teacher or mentor.
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As said before choices may vary for each person but we can do a basics of a good teacher;
1-)Who has lots of knowledge about Budo,life,morals and philosophy
2-)Who is also capable of using the above mentioned skills and knowledge.
3-)Who has a big heart and nice in personality.
4-)Who makes you want to come for the next class.
5-)Who teach you good and wants your progress.
6-)Who trains regularly with soke and keeps himself updated.
Please add more of the basics.

Posted on: 2007/6/12 14:54
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Re: My criterion for selecting a teacher or mentor.
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Toruko-jin, I do like your list! You have given some thought to this. A good instructor should be primarily concerned with his student's learning with their progress. What good is it if he/she can do something but can't teach you how to do the same?

Posted on: 2007/6/12 21:42
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Re: My criterion for selecting a teacher or mentor.
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That doesn't necessarily make them an instructor I wouldn't train with. I mean, learning how to teach something takes patience and practice. It is much easier to simply perform a task than it is to explain the hows and whys. If I had a teacher that could do something but couldn't explain how to do it, then I would hope that instructor would provide me with proper resources to make it easier for me to learn. Bringing in someone who does know how to do that particular technique would be a good idea. Sometimes it just takes another person's point of view. It may not be that the instructor cannot explain how to do it, it may just be that the wiring in your head might need a different way of explaining it. We all learn in different manners.

Shawn

Posted on: 2007/6/13 1:53
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Re: My criterion for selecting a teacher or mentor.
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I like the list a lot too.
If a prospective teacher/mentor has a dojo, then that dojo is in some way reflexion of who he/she is... Hence, a complementary way is to check the energy of the dojo as well...

I would like to share what has always worked for me.
My old aikido teacher, Bill Witt, gave me this "algorithm" for choosing a dojo:
- come and ask if you can watch the class...(if the answer is "no" you cannot proceed with this algorithm)
- while watching, check three following things:
- are the beginners treated with respect and care?
- are people having fun training?
- about what the teacher does: does it work and does it seem like something you would like to learn?


regards
mn

Posted on: 2007/6/13 8:24
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