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Re: Perennial Japanese manners and customs
Occasional Visitor
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2007/8/8 22:31
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Hi Everyone;
I am particularly interested in Japanese customs, the book recommended by Erizabesu seems like a good start to me.

Is there anymore information on Japanese etiquette (particularly for females)?

In the risk of wandering off topic, i have been looking into the traditional green tea ceremony. I have found a few sites about tea ceremonies and the art of flower arranging.
Does anyone know about Japanese gardening?

Do people feel that these arts may be beneficial in co-operation with bujinkan?
Are there any other individuals interested in these arts?


Thank you,
Amie.

Posted on: 2007/12/7 6:56
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Re: Perennial Japanese manners and customs
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Amie,

Something I'm thinking and studying about right now is modes of communication and attitudes towards words in Japanese culture and language.

JapanesePod101 has a interesting investigation of words, idioms and proverbs to do with silence here. See Ken Loo's blog Notes of Doubt about A Concrete Silence. Also, see this readable academic paper about cultural influences on communication in Japanese culture.

Posted on: 2007/12/7 11:38
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Re: Perennial Japanese manners and customs
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I have a question I hope somebody can help me with. In this manners book ( Perennial Japanese manners and customs); the first plate (illustration) on the child's birthday; there is a scroll in the picture of a maybe Chinese warrior. I have the exact scroll of that warrior and all the Orient Art Center in San Fransico could tell me is that mine is several hundred years old. Anybody else ever seen that scroll? Or any thoughts on it? Or know any information on it.
Please help.
Barry

Posted on: 2007/12/9 2:30
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Re: Perennial Japanese manners and customs
Village Old Timer
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In today's Japan Times -

Bad public manners irk Bushido proponent

By TAI KAWABATA
Staff writer
Sokichi Sugimura, 72, feels elements of Japanese society have lost their moral compass to the point of being downright rude and he and his associates want to put them back on course, and in the process embrace samurai values.

As head of Tokyo-based Public Art Research Institute, Sugimura since 2002 has organized more than 40 guided tours of "bisan" (beautiful assets and skills) around the country, in such places as Tokyo, Yokohama, Saitama, Osaka, Kyoto, Sapporo and Toyama.

--snip--

Mr. Sugimura will hold a study group based on Inanzo Nitobe's book Bushido at Engakuji Temple, Kamakura City, on June 21st. You'll find the contact info in the article.

Posted on: 2008/6/3 14:01
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Re: Perennial Japanese manners and customs
Village Old Timer
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Shawn mentioned in the thread regarding the use of Japanese language that,if you're going to learn Japanese, please learn keigo, or polite Japanese.

When you enter or exit a dojo, please remember to bow and say an appropriate greeting - "Ohayo gozaimasu" in the morning, "Konnichi wa" after noon, and "Konban wa" in the evening. When the Shihan are showing a technique, don't talk, and when they finish demonstrating, bow to your sensei and then bow and say "Onegaishimasu", please assist me, to your Japanese dojo members. When you're done training, always say "Arigatou gozaimasu", thank you, and bow to your training partner.

If you can do these simple things, the local Japanese and foreign people will be so much more at ease with you. You demonstrate respect and care if you learn even a tiny bit of good manners. And there are way too many codes for you to observe when you're a short term visitor in Japan. But trying is the most important part.

In Bujinkan dojos, we take our break time on the mat. This is not usually done in other budo systems. The mat is a place of training. Please do not lounge on the mat, lie on the mat, or stretch your feet out in front of you. Sit cross-legged or in seiza. Also, if the Shihan is speaking, your mouth is closed. Some Shihan appear very relaxed and casual, and they are; but they're Japanese and they have certain baseline expectations of how people should behave. When they talk, you listen.

If you are called on to be a Shihan or Shidoshi's uke, remember to bow before you approach him/her, and bow when you're done the movement. This shows respect to your teacher, and demonstrates that you are aware of the teacher's timing (when s/he gestures for your to come to the mat, and when s/he is done with you).

Please do not use the expression "Domo" unless you understand how to use it correctly. It's not polite to a senior member of the dojo. Also, avoid saying "So so" when you confirm something. This, too, is an expression used by a senior to a junior, and is unlikely to be appropriate in your speech (I'm assuming you, reader, are younger and less senior than the Japanese members of the dojos in Japan).

When you finish training, please remember to bow when you leave the edge of the mat or the "genkan", or receiving hall, of the dojo. This shows respect to other budoka who are still training, for example, people in a neighbouring class. Also, you can do a great deal of international relations by greeting other budoka in the genkan of the dojo you're training at. This shows our common bond of budo and shows a respect to people who are senior in martial training even in other disciplines.

Posted on: 2008/6/4 19:58
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