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Re: Kacem's Interview
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If a skilled swordsman from 16th centry Japan somehow came forward in time, how much of what we do today would be effective against him?


I will admitt that my understanding of 16th century swordsmen is basic at best. But what I have understood is that they were warriors as a profession. They spent a good portion of their lives doing what most of us do for only 6 hours a week. I would certainly admitt that their skill level would be far above mine if for no other reason than that.

Most of us have day jobs and I know that my bosses would frown greatly if I started to use taijutsu in the work place.

But even in todays age, we have our warriors. Wheather they be soldiers or professional martial artists or law enforcement officials, their job IS the perfection of such skills. I always wondered what it would be like to be able to train all day everyday. I came up with the fact that it would hurt like all heck in the beginning (and maybe longer). But I would hope that eventually I couldn't help but gain a little ground in this art.

Posted on: 2010/11/9 2:55
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Re: Kacem's Interview
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Quote:

Damien wrote:
Quote:

If a skilled swordsman from 16th century Japan somehow came forward in time, how much of what we do today would be effective against him?


But even in todays age, we have our warriors. Whether they be soldiers or professional martial artists or law enforcement officials, their job IS the perfection of such skills.


This is an important point. Their trained elite would die against our trained elite, simply because our technology is better. Standard foot soldiers armed with rifles showed just how trained samurai would do against superior technology.

However, put that samurai in a room, no weapons, against the average Bujinkan budoka and I think the answer is obvious. But, you are comparing the elite vs the regular. Take a hardened Spec Ops soldier and pit him against a standard GI and I think the answer is equally obvious.

Times are different. The reasons people train are different. The training has to reflect the reason. "Elite" has to be the goal of that reason.

Posted on: 2010/11/10 0:27
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Re: Kacem's Interview
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If you want to be great or even good at a MA then you need to take it seriously. You need to train like Olympic athletes, doctors, profesional classical musicians or ballerinas. Anything else is just imagination. If you are not training as such then you should not get upset if folks aren`t taking your skills seriously.


Posted on: 2010/11/10 15:51
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Re: Kacem's Interview
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Yes, be serious about YOUR training, seek the best instruction you can find, put effort into it, BUT do not make it your life. Do not expect others to do as you do, they have their own goals which are just as valid for them as yours are for you. It is not the short burst of training at the beginning that develops you, it is the continuation of training throughout your life that will get you the real benefit. That is at least part of the message in "keep going".

Posted on: 2010/11/10 20:59
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Re: Kacem's Interview
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Wasn’t it boring for a 17 year old to constantly and exclusively practice on just three techniques?

Dr.K.Z.: Not at all! Those three techniques don’t just have the simplified meaning most practitioners give them but represent many more things. Tsuki is not just a punch but a whole way of body movement, so you can penetrate through the adversary with one blow. It’s governed by the concept of one blow-one life. Uke in reality means to accept but many people erroneously translate it as block. However, the word block has a very hard and absolute meaning. When we block, our whole body, as well as our heart, hardens and tightens , resulting in our energy being immobilized too. When our energy gets immobilized then death comes. The word uke has more to do with the flow and freedom in movement, while we respond to the everchanging demands of battle. Finally, with the term geri we mean the kicks, which also have very many demands and ingredients that can’t be seen at first glance. So, in reality I had a lot of work to do.


I personally liked this bit of the article.

Posted on: 2010/11/19 12:00
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