Login
Username:

Password:

Remember me



Lost Password?

Register now!
Socialize
 

Recent Topics
Topic Replies Last Post
Travel Safety Tips 0 1/16 1:36
elina30
Using couriers 8 2018/8/22 18:27
Bowlby_18
Wedding gift... can someone help me to translate it? 6 2018/6/30 20:50
Barga18
Aomori-Ken 0 2018/6/19 10:27
hanzo-tou
Certificates 0 2018/5/8 4:34
schistkicker

Browsing this Thread:   1 Anonymous Users



(1) 2 3 4 5 »


Elemental Exposure
Villager
Joined:
2003/6/4 9:44
From Missouri
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 96
Offline
Anyone ever expose themselves to cold temperatures ie training outside with no shirt on in the cold or rain? just to push your mind and body? :)

Posted on: 2010/11/28 4:25
_________________
Tim Craig
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Elemental Exposure
Cant Stay Offline
Joined:
2003/2/4 2:12
From Sacramento, CA (USA)
Group:
村民 :: Villager
村長 :: Admin
議長 :: Mod
Posts: 1024
Offline
I have done all sorts of crazy things, all in the name of "pushing" myself, some of which I would have rather avoided. Ahhh the warped judgment of youth...

My military experiences were centered around heat conditions (desert), but not cold. Even so, I've spent my share of early training outside in all the elements. Although good for conditioning and learning what the body can handle, there are serious risks involved.

Many people have put themselves into insane medical risk by doing this type of thing without proper guidance. I remember back in the late '80's there was a group that had to be rescued in the snow because they were doing a "winter ninja camp" and decided it would be good training to be up in the freezing snow and ice covered woods dressed in white ninja keiko gi and tabi... Seriously...

My recommendation is that if you expose your body to ANY extreme situation, you should first make sure you can handle it (i.e. doctor gives ok) and, second, you have a "spotter" who isn't undergoing those conditions so that they can provide aid if necessary.

Posted on: 2010/11/28 10:14
_________________
Darren Dumas

I never considered a difference of opinion in politics, in religion, or in philosophy, as cause for withdrawing from a friend. ~ Thomas Jefferson
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Elemental Exposure
Honorary Villager
Joined:
2010/8/20 12:20
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 27
Offline
I have done some things similar to what you are saying, but always with a second (or spotter as Darren said). Suigyo/Misogyo is a good one for that, but you need to have at least a little help from someone who knows what they are doing or you run not only health risks, but also risks related to ego etc.

Posted on: 2010/11/28 14:54
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Elemental Exposure
Villager
Joined:
2003/6/4 9:44
From Missouri
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 96
Offline
Thanks for the replies :)

Posted on: 2010/12/6 15:33
_________________
Tim Craig
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Unsubscribed
Re: Elemental Exposure
Deleted_Unsubscribed
Quote:

Novice wrote:
Anyone ever expose themselves to cold temperatures ie training outside with no shirt on in the cold or rain? just to push your mind and body? :)



Yes.

But I have spent significantly more time outside every day working in the British Columbia interior, where during the winter it can get at low as -30 or worse. Which doesn't do much for your ego outside of making that warm fire and hot chocolate look like the winning lottery ticket.

I have heard my share of Bujinkan practitioners brag about their time spent training outdoors in the cold and the rain. I have seen many of them training. While I congratulate them for bundling up in scarves and mittens and getting their do gi wet and muddy, there is no substantial evidence that this has contributed to improving the quality of their movement or increasing their understanding of the arts themselves.

My advice is to have fun with this sort of thing but at the same time be careful and go slow, especially in temperatures that you are not accustomed to. All the good advice that any qualified wilderness survival school instructor or emergency rescue personnel might impart to you would be well worth paying attention to.

But please don't be mislead by anyone into thinking that training outdoors is the panacea that will magically improve your taijutsu, or that the way Bujinkan practitioners train outside is equivalent to the way the "ninja" trained "back in the day".

Tread carefully.


- Mark Spada

Posted on: 2010/12/15 1:59
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Elemental Exposure
Active Kutakian
Joined:
2009/3/18 12:31
From Redmond, Washington
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 108
Offline

We often condition ourselves and our taijutsu to expect nice, level mats when reality is anything of the sort. We've been training outdoors since day one as there is pavilion that keeps us out of the rain when it gets bad.

But just getting tougher against cold or heat isn't the real reason for training outdoors. It's the variety of ground that counts.

Take your bo or tachi into the woods around closely packed trees and try them out with some speed. Practice your punching/blocking with a partner on a slope. Ukemi going downhill/uphill/on the side can be a very different animal from the dojo. When you realize how difficult it can be to maintain proper alignment and movement on different ground, it also informs your gut where the best defense can be made.

The bottom line is that before you get into temperature or other extremes, just doing what you do in new environments might have a better effect. That, in my opinion, is the best reason for training outside.

Posted on: 2010/12/16 1:48
_________________
John du Pre Gauntt

Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Unsubscribed
Re: Elemental Exposure
Deleted_Unsubscribed
Quote:

jgaunttWA wrote:

We often condition ourselves and our taijutsu to expect nice, level mats when reality is anything of the sort.



That would depend solely on what you categorize as "reality".

Although I currently live in a cold, wet, Pacific climate surrounded by rocky slopes, my daily "reality" is really no different than virtually anyone else's in North America: the floor is flat and level. The pavement is flat and level. No matter where you go....your home, your office, the mall, the movie theater, the grocery store, etc.....you are likely to encounter surfaces that are, in fact, flat and level. Only when deliberately placing yourself in a forest or a mountain trail would you encounter a surface that wasn't.

When Bujinkan practitioners claim that they are training for some sort of "reality", I have found that what they really mean is indulging in a contrivance that is an environment anything other than what they would normally find themselves in. In other words, unless you hang out in the woods all day and walk around on uneven surfaces, your "reality" would be a surface that was flat and level.

My previous admonition to the OP was based on my own experience. In nearly twenty years, I have never met a Bujinkan practitioner who claimed to train outdoors all the time who didn't have major problems with their movement. It is also a mistake to believe that the arts that we study and practice evolved solely in some remote wilderness setting; for example, the suwari waza that is part and parcel of Bujinkan training wasn't based on bushi sitting around in the mud.

I feel it was said best by the great twenty-first century philosopher David Lee Roth:

"If you can't do it in a t-shirt and jeans under a bare bulb, you just can't do it."


- Mark Spada

Posted on: 2010/12/16 2:47
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Elemental Exposure
Just Passing Through
Joined:
2010/12/16 4:22
From Los Angeles
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 2
Offline
I agree that we spend the majority of our days in an office building or a mall or somewhere with flat, even surfaces. But, the "reality" is the majority of attacks are not going to come inside the office building, they're going to come in the parking garage, in your driveway, on the sidewalk, etc. where the ground is absolutely uneven.

Training outdoors gives you the variety of uneven surfaces, allowing your body to become accustomed to moving properly in any circumstance, regardless of how flat, uneven, etc. Training in the middle of a forest with abundant trees could simulate manipulating weapons and your opponents in crowded streets. Since it's difficult to train in the combat aspect of taijutsu in crowded areas, we can use environment to aid us in that respect. Also, training outdoors at night is a great way to train since the majority of attacks come ... you guessed it ... outdoors at night. Simple tactics like learning to silhouette your opponent against the night sky and disappear into the ground can mean the difference between life and death when it counts.

None of us can predict when or where or even if that attack will come, but dismissing the notion of training outdoors or in different environments simply because your daily life isn't spent outdoors seems like a limiting approach. But, I also agree that training outdoors absolutely does not provide some sort of divine connection to the taijutsu gods, magically making you a superbudohero. Training is training. Train anywhere, everywhere, constantly.

Posted on: 2010/12/16 5:17
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Elemental Exposure
Active Kutakian
Joined:
2004/7/26 12:43
From Australia
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 133
Offline
Hi Mark,

Quote:

markspada wrote:

My previous admonition to the OP was based on my own experience. In nearly twenty years, I have never met a Bujinkan practitioner who claimed to train outdoors all the time who didn't have major problems with their movement.

- Mark Spada


Hi Mark,

If possible could you upload some footage of yourself demonstrating correct movement please?

Thanks and regards,
Matt

Posted on: 2010/12/16 6:11
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Elemental Exposure
Active Kutakian
Joined:
2004/7/26 12:43
From Australia
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 133
Offline
Quote:

stuntguy wrote:

Training outdoors gives you the variety of uneven surfaces, allowing your body to become accustomed to moving properly in any circumstance, regardless of how flat, uneven, etc.


Hi Jeff,

Similarly, if possible could you upload some footage of moving properly in any circumstance, for example outdoors, please?

Thanks and regards,
Matt

Posted on: 2010/12/16 6:14
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer



(1) 2 3 4 5 »




[Advanced Search]


Today's Sponsor