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Re: Interesting article on Tameshigiri
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Posted on: 2011/2/8 1:56
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Re: Interesting article on Tameshigiri
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Imagine a golf announcer describing the approach and the tee off.


Posted on: 2011/2/8 2:00
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Re: Interesting article on Tameshigiri
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RJHIII wrote:


Imagine a golf announcer describing the approach and the tee off.



Heh, yes.

It is important to remember, however, that such demonstrations of skill do reveal something.

Obata Toshishiro, for example is known to be able to cut 8 or more tatami (I have heard he has done 10) with shomen giri. I am sure there are plenty who would jump up and say, that this just means he swings hard. That is partially true, he does have to use more power.

However, it also means his hasuji and understanding of distance in that cut are just about perfect.

Also, he was doing this sort of thing long before we had the specialized goza cutter so popular today (at least in the states). He was doing such cuts with a sword that he very well would destroy if he was off.

I believe it is Takeyuki Hidefusa Miura of the MJER who is able to cut 8 free standing, single sheets of paper with a yoko cut and not topple them while having it be perfectly level. Anyone who knows about yoko giri knows that it is extremely difficult to do such a thing. Again, no special type of sword is used. He is also a student of a branch of Kukishin Ryu Bojutsu.

I have seen a video of it online, but I can't find it. Here is a link to the ejmas article showing a picture: http://ejmas.com/tin/tinart_taylor_0701.htm

In the end, tameshigiri is a type of practice, but it must be done "correctly" to be of value. Your mileage may vary.

Posted on: 2011/2/8 15:25
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Re: Interesting article on Tameshigiri
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That "Enter the Ninja" dude is using a Highlander Samurai sword.

I also heard a story about another Japanese Sword demonstration in West Japan a few years ago where the blade flew out of the handle during the downward cut killing one of the children in attendance. If I was that student behind him who got hit with sword in the video then maybe I would leave his dojo. I think proper handling of the sword is a skill just as important as being able to cut someone in half.

Posted on: 2011/2/9 16:47
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Re: Interesting article on Tameshigiri
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Quote:

MMAdaisuki wrote:
That "Enter the Ninja" dude is using a Highlander Samurai sword.

I also heard a story about another Japanese Sword demonstration in West Japan a few years ago where the blade flew out of the handle during the downward cut killing one of the children in attendance. If I was that student behind him who got hit with sword in the video then maybe I would leave his dojo. I think proper handling of the sword is a skill just as important as being able to cut someone in half.



Oh, things like that happen. That particular story is, as far as I know, true. Also true, a nanadan in iaido was performing a vertical draw and didn't perform sayabiki properly. His blade split through the saya and he cut off his own thumb.

I know of someone who scalped himself performing chiburi, and I have heard a few stories about people sticking their swords through their own arms when performing thrusts to the rear after nukitsuke (drawing).

Swords are dangerous, just like any other weapon. You have to respect that, or you can easily injure or kill yourself or others.

Posted on: 2011/2/10 12:42
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Re: Interesting article on Tameshigiri
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Quote:
Tameshigiri is something that should be done after many long years of iai training, once one has reached a certain level of licensed proficiency. Tameshigiri allows one to adapt the iai kata to real cutting practice. In other words, iai should be the core, and the application of the kata in tameshigiri should be secondary.


So this part of the whole thing is the most important part probably of the article for those wanting to do tameshigiri.

Posted on: 2011/2/11 0:30
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Re: Interesting article on Tameshigiri
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Mature audiences only

Posted on: 2011/2/11 0:49
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Re: Interesting article on Tameshigiri
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There isn't much on the internet that surprises me. However, those two videos did. Into the bookmarks you go.

As to the article. Yep, one should spend a lot of time on kihon in any endeavor, particularly nearly 3ft. sharp pieces of steel.

However, as you may well know, some schools of iai strictly forbid tameshigiri of any type. It is taboo. I think this is an over reaction due to some history and an over reverence of the sword, but that is just my opinion.

If we treat budo as some unobtainable endeavor, well, that just doesn't make any sense to me. You may never perfect it, but you can surely become quite skilled. If you never have a chance to test your skills, even in a simulation, then you don't really know your true capacity.

Your video hunting skills are extraordinary.

Posted on: 2011/2/11 14:35
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