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Re: Learning from Aikido?
Kutaki Postmaster
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Quote:

Papa-san wrote:
You've made some good points but also some that show lack of understanding what taijutsu really is. If you have trained well you WILL flow and you will NOT tense up in the real situation. The adrenilin dump comes from fear that you can't handle the situation.


After only a couple of decades I do have a long way to go in my undertanding of taijutsu admittedly, I don't think most people train 'well' to the degree that they could take a dig in the ribs without tensing or interupting their flow, and I always work from the point of view of being overclassed and fighting back from a position of being in real danger of losing having arady been overwhelmed, because this is a very real possibility, and like it or not, the bext exponent will get hit or cut at east once in an unarmed or armed encounter. If you do indeed train people in repiclation of these conditions so that they do not flinch, freeze or close up momentarily upon experiencing pain or being overwhelmed then I am very interested in how this is achieved so that I can work on it. Having control of a real fight from the offset and flowing smugly through attacker after attacker like Stephen Seagal in a movie is just not a level of skill that I will personally ever achieve or believe most of our practitioners will be able to pul off in a really nasty situation.

All I am really saying is that the likelihood of your taijutsu working against other fighting styles (or formless street methods) is increased by training with exponents from other backgrounds, because very few of them are anything like taijutsu. It is all about comfort zone. I do not suffer badly from adrenaline dump fear of not being able to handle the situation, I just get on with it and accept that it won't all go my way. But avoiding tension altogether in a situation involving unknown strangers, threat levels and trying to appraise a mutitiude of factors to effect your survival and escape, is a tall order even for trained professionals, let alone most floppy taijutsuka. A cool head is certainly achievable to some degree, but a cool body to match would mean far more exposure to real danger than is sensible in order to be desensitised. And sometimes tensing is good, to contract muscles to absorb a blow that is otherwise unavoidable for example, or has slipped through your defences.

Posted on: 2011/6/21 23:29
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Re: Learning from Aikido?
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Here's something you might try, do about 5 or 10 spins to create a little dizziness and then have someone immediately attack you. No prearranged attack, just any kind. See how you respond in the disoriented state. The human body does not want to be hurt and it uses what you teach it to keep itself safe, that's why it is so important that effective muscle memory is fed into your body. Also keep in mind that there is deeply engrained movement in all of us, it is best to "tweak" that movement rather then "replace" it. An attempt to replace it rather then build on it can lead to real problems.

Posted on: 2011/6/22 21:03
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Ed Martin aka Papa-san
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Re: Learning from Aikido?
Kutaki Postmaster
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From South East UK
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Quote:

Papa-san wrote:
Here's something you might try, do about 5 or 10 spins to create a little dizziness and then have someone immediately attack you. No prearranged attack, just any kind. See how you respond in the disoriented state. The human body does not want to be hurt and it uses what you teach it to keep itself safe, that's why it is so important that effective muscle memory is fed into your body. Also keep in mind that there is deeply engrained movement in all of us, it is best to "tweak" that movement rather then "replace" it. An attempt to replace it rather then build on it can lead to real problems.



Thanks Ed, I will try that exercise, in fact it is not new to me as it was done at the end of each Krav Maga class I attended a while back, with one person putting two fingers (of the same hand) on the floor and then running around those fingers for 30-60 seconds and then being attacked by the whole class, with weapons, simultaneous attacks etc!

Obviously no one tried to seriously hurt or kill the person in the middle so it does have limitations, as does any 'realistic' training (otherwise there would be no need for separate words 'real' and 'realistic')

I also agree about training the flinch response to be more efficient which I guessed is what you meant by tweaking.

I fear I have gone too far off topic now though, unless someone can bring aikido back into the mix!

Posted on: 2011/6/22 22:37
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Re: Learning from Aikido?
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From Matsudo City, Chiba, Japan
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Back on the topic of Aikido...

In a year of training in aikido in rural Shikoku, I kept up my fitness and got to take tests for the kyu grades from a senior teacher from Fukuoka. The rank didn't matter much to me as much as the experience of doing budo in Japan, experiencing the protocol of the test procedure, learning about dojo and budo culture, and Japanese language. I was lucky to also have an American teacher (a fluent Japanese speaker and her Japanese husband).

Learning another Japanese martial art may be beneficial for learning something about budo in general, and perhaps learn about the strengths of other budo forms.

What kind of Aikido is available to you? Aikido is a pretty broad category of budo.

Posted on: 2011/6/23 15:53
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