Login
Username:

Password:

Remember me



Lost Password?

Register now!
Socialize
 

Recent Topics
Topic Replies Last Post
TOGAKURE'S TAJ JUTSU 13 2017/12/11 12:54
fskopfpatro
Papa San RIP 3 2017/12/11 12:43
fskopfpatro
Kito Ryu Ten No Maki 16 2017/12/11 12:40
fskopfpatro
Anyone tried Rosetta Stone? 20 2017/12/10 13:18
fskopfpatro
BladesPro 14 2017/12/9 17:45
fskopfpatro

Browsing this Thread:   1 Anonymous Users



« 1 2 (3) 4 »


Re: Shiken Haramitsu Daikomyo!
Deleted_
Quote:

Tessen3 wrote:
Does anybody know the kanji for Shikin?


It's '詞韻', but I couldn't find this word in my big dictionary.
Does anyone have any info? And I wonder why this is read as 'Shikin' not 'Shiin'....

Posted on: 2004/2/23 11:04
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Shiken Haramitsu Daikomyo!
村長 :: Sonchou
Joined:
2003/1/24 17:34
From Chiba, Japan
Group:
村長 :: Admin
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 1546
Offline
I was also unable to find that phrase itself anywhere, but looking at the kanji individually:


名詞 【めいし】 noun
格助詞 【かくじょし】 case-marking particle; case marker; case particle
格前置詞 【かくぜんちし】 case preposition
掛詞 【かけことば】 (n) pun; play on words
懸詞 【かけことば】 (n) pun; play on words
掛け詞 【かけことば】 (n) pun; play on words
過去分詞 【かこぶんし】 (n) past participle


韻 【いん】 (n) rhyme
音韻 【おんいん】 (n) vocal sound; phoneme
音韻 【おんいんけいしき】 phonetic form

"Shi" in each case has to do with a word or part of speech, while "In" (maybe pronounced "Kin" simply because its easier to say "Shikin" than "Shi'in"? there's a good question for Sensei...) has to do with rhyming and sound.

My understanding is that these two together mean "the sound of the words themselves" - in other words "the sound that the phrase 'Shikin Haramitsu Daikomyo' itself makes."

Shawn

Posted on: 2004/2/23 11:33
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Shiken Haramitsu Daikomyo!
Deleted_
Quote:

kouryuu wrote:
maybe pronounced "Kin" simply because its easier to say "Shikin" than "Shi'in"? there's a good question for Sensei...) has to do with rhyming and sound.


I have had the same idea but I haven't seen any proof... Asking Soke? Hmmm, I'm afraid we should train instead. (笑)


To tell you the truth, I could find a lot of pages on the net. One of the good(-looking) pages is

http://www5a.biglobe.ne.jp/%7Eshici/sub4.htm
(Most others are written in Chinese.)

This is on Chinese poetry, I think. Too difficult for me.

Posted on: 2004/2/23 12:51
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Shiken Haramitsu Daikomyo!
Kutaki Postmaster
Joined:
2003/9/17 2:20
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 202
Offline
To our Japanese expert:

I've seen two versions so far (see below).

詞韻波羅蜜大光明
詞韻波羅密大光明

Which one is the correct one? What is the other one?

Every comment is appreciated.

Posted on: 2004/2/23 17:22
_________________
John Walker
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Shikin Haramitsu Daikomyo --- Kanji
Kutaki Postmaster
Joined:
2003/9/17 2:20
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 202
Offline

Mr. Ohashi

Could you please help me?

I've seen two versions for Shikin Haramitsu Daikomyo so far (see below). Both are Shodo (calligraphy).

1) 詞韻波羅蜜大光明
2) 詞韻波羅密大光明

Which one is the "correct" one? What is the other one?
Which one is used in Bujinkan normally (I think it's #2)?

Thanks a lot.


Posted on: 2004/2/26 6:20
_________________
John Walker
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Shikin Haramitsu Daikomyo --- Kanji
Deleted_
Quote:

Which one is the "correct" one? What is the other one?


I think both are correct. 波羅蜜/波羅密 is from 'paramita' and it seems that both versions have been used.

http://www.google.com/search?num=50&lr=lang_ja&q="波羅蜜"
http://www.google.com/search?num=50&lr=lang_ja&q="波羅密"
http://www.google.com/search?num=50&h ... e+%8C%9F%8D%F5&lr=lang_ja

I hope some other guys know better than me. (I'm a Japanese but I don't know a lot about Buddhism.)

Quote:

Which one is used in Bujinkan normally (I think it's #2)?


Probably, but not sure. Does anyone know?

Posted on: 2004/2/26 6:37
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Shikin Haramitsu Daikomyo --- Kanji
村長 :: Sonchou
Joined:
2003/1/24 17:34
From Chiba, Japan
Group:
村長 :: Admin
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 1546
Offline
From having seen Sensei write it a few times, I'm quite sure its the second one. Then again, he may use a different kanji at different times, depending on his mood.

Posted on: 2004/2/26 12:50
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Shikin Haramitsu Daikomyo --- Kanji
Villager
Joined:
2005/5/13 6:38
From Manchester, England
Group:
村民 :: Villager
Posts: 67
Offline
I also read somewhere that "Shikin Haramitsu Daikomyo" is a means of warding off the evil spirits that may consume the dojo and to protect us from any serious harm, and is it really classed as a prayer, as i am quite interested in the Japanese religions like Buddhism and Shinto and on one specific site i read that when the Japanese are praying in a Buddhist temple they do actually clap before they bow and it also states that the clap is a means of grabing the attention of the god that guards the specific temple, is this the case with bowing ceremony we do in Ninjutsu also i've read that bowing ceremony in the begining/after the training is a shinto prayer???

Posted on: 2005/10/5 5:43
_________________
Giuseppe Storto,
Shadow Warrior Bujinkan Dojo
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Shikin Haramitsu Daikomyo --- Kanji
Deleted_
Hi,

I was told by a shihan that it was from sanskript and that it meant something like: "every things we see, hear, touch, think, etc can lead to illumination".

Regards

Posted on: 2005/10/5 6:13
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer


Re: Shikin Haramitsu Daikomyo --- Kanji
Deleted_
Quote:

bujinkan83 wrote:
I also read somewhere that "Shikin Haramitsu Daikomyo" is a means of warding off the evil spirits that may consume the dojo and to protect us from any serious harm, and is it really classed as a prayer, as i am quite interested in the Japanese religions like Buddhism and Shinto and on one specific site i read that when the Japanese are praying in a Buddhist temple they do actually clap before they bow and it also states that the clap is a means of grabing the attention of the god that guards the specific temple, is this the case with bowing ceremony we do in Ninjutsu also i've read that bowing ceremony in the begining/after the training is a shinto prayer???


Hello All!

There are many, many good books about Buddhism available. There are also a few good ones on Shinto. A look at your favorite bookseller or library should give you plenty of study for awhile. I point this out because there is more diversity in both Buddhism and Shinto than can be adequately and honestly addressed in a few posts on a message board. To make sweeping statements about 'clapping, bowing, and even prayer' in either of these two groupings of religion is certain to promote misconceptions.

Please don't misunderstand me. I believe that to ask about the origins and meanings of the opening and closing rituals of our training may indeed be important and worthwhile. But religion and religious philosophies tend to be very difficult to put into neat little packages that everyone of its practioners will agree is truly representative of 'the essence'. I have studied (briefly) in a Buddhist temple (in Japan) where we did NOT clap. In addition, every dojo I visited in Japan that had a Kamidana also had a 'bow/clap' ritual of one form or another, regardless of the specific art.

And finally to get to my point, I believe a more useful approach to this topic is to ask ourselves (regularly) 'Does this ritual have meaning to me?', and if so then 'What does it mean to me now?'

Ganbatte Kudasai!

K.H.

Posted on: 2005/10/5 6:33
Transfer the post to other applications Transfer



« 1 2 (3) 4 »




[Advanced Search]


Today's Sponsor