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Genralisation or specialisation
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In Martial Arts we need to accept that we are indeed defeatable. So how should we train should we specialise in one aspect of the martial arts just like the Gracies and their Brazilian Jujitsu, Or a Judoka and his tukuiwaza, or a boxer and his favorite combo. By doing this obviously leaving ourself open to what you have neglected. The recent Decline of Gracie success in MMA is an example of this.

Or do we genralise and become a true combatant. Or do we? Do we just end up confusing ourselves with a myriad of techniques and eventually end up triping over our own feet, stumbling to think what would best suit the situation

I think I know what you will say but it would be interesting to see your thoughts.
Please discuss.

Michael Thomas

Posted on: 2004/10/22 16:44
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Re: Genralisation or specialisation
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imho i think we should just nuckle down and study this budo as much and as well as we can, but keeping a life balance. trust in soke and takamatsu sensei, you could spend a life trying all the others looking at what is best.
i think some people might be quite shallow in that they study an art because it is cool at the moment, they get to wear trendy gi's and win plastic trophys. not that there is anything wrong with that if they are enjoying themselves, but i just study this because i really like it, in fact i am a bit embarrased to say i do 'ninjutsu'(hollywood flip out, neck chop) and would rather just keep it to myself, but if pushed i'll say bujinkan budo taijutsu, and if they haven't heard of it , tough.
there is just so much to learn!, one lifetime isn't enough, so i don't feel i have anytime to waste on any other arts, but still keep time for hobbies.

also this bujinkan art is changing me somehow, i never felt that with years of karate. particularly in the last year and a half, when i found a real deal teacher. there is a lot more being learned that physical movements, thats for sure. i hope the motivation never leaves me and i can become a good practisioner of the art.

.02 yen

Posted on: 2004/10/22 17:52
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darren stewart

Oldschoolcarpentry.com.au
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Re: Genralisation or specialisation
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IMHO, I think we just continue to train. This is a life path and there is really no goal or end, until death. By setting a goal as such we instantly throw out things to achieve that goal, things that would be considered unnecessary now, but after we have grown as a warrior we find that it really was important. Conversely, I think that if we don't set specific goals as such, if we truely progress along the path, the necessary skills will become available without forcing it. I really think that in a very broad sense of the phrase we should strive to emulate Soke. At the same time we should be relaxed and let budo be the guiding path. I think in a broader sense, setting specific or focused goals like that is not relaxed and just like taijutsu, you cannot or should not force a technique, rather let it happen, and I think that setting specific training goals (such as I am going to learn specific techniques) is equivelant of forcing a technique in taijutsu.

Of course this is my opinion at this moment and it is subject to change as my knowledge and experience increases.


Posted on: 2004/10/23 1:03
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David Russ
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Re: Genralisation or specialisation
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Dazza,

Quote:

dazza wrote:
in fact i am a bit embarrased to say i do 'ninjutsu'(hollywood flip out, neck chop) and would rather just keep it to myself, but if pushed i'll say bujinkan budo taijutsu, and if they haven't heard of it , tough.


I agree with you. I don't like to associate myself with the hollywood ninja movies either.

Quote:

also this bujinkan art is changing me somehow, i never felt that with years of karate.

there is a lot more being learned that physical movements, thats for sure.


I couldn't agree more! We usually sit and discuss any questions following training. Recently the subject came up and I said that this is something that is not a hobby. It does not feel the same as... let's say going to the gym to work out. There is something about this that I feel in my heart that is becoming part of me. I was explaining to my instructor how I realize it is slowly growing into a guide map or path for me. This feeling becomes more profound as the weeks and months pass. I find that most people don't understand if I try to explain why I train.



Posted on: 2004/10/23 1:17
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David Russ
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Re: Genralisation or specialisation
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I read once, that we are not just learning techniques, we are learning about humanity, what it means to be human. Humans are many things, we are uke, tori, sons, daughters, students, friends, teenagers, twenty-thirty-forty-fifty-somethings (some even older!). Sometimes we are a victim, sometimes we are the victimizer. Some times we work hard in class and in life, sometimes we are lazy.
We are also animals, some are baser then others, but we all have drives. How do my drives compell me to act in the dojo? What about in my relationships? How about in my job? I think if you specialize in one thing, it should be to learn how to be a real human being.

My .2

Posted on: 2004/10/23 11:11
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Mike Hunt
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Re: Genralisation or specialisation
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technics and gross motor skill sets serve will not help you. Training diligently will.

Posted on: 2004/10/24 0:32
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Re: Genralisation or specialisation
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Quote:

Kintiiwa wrote:
technics and gross motor skill sets serve will not help you. Training diligently will.


That was the point I was trying to get across.

Posted on: 2004/10/24 5:11
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David Russ
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Re: Genralisation or specialisation
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Quote:
bigshadow
this is something that is not a hobby


its a passion, a purpose and a life goal.

Posted on: 2004/10/25 14:19
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Jon
"Take this with a grain of salt, hell salt to taste"
“He who seeks knowledge begins with humbleness”, Buju Banton
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Re: Genralisation or specialisation
Permanent Village Fixture
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Quote:

Jon wrote:
its a passion, a purpose and a life goal.


Precisely!

Posted on: 2004/10/25 23:20
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David Russ
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Re: Genralisation or specialisation
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Quote:

bigshadow wrote:
By setting a goal as such we instantly throw out things to achieve that goal, things that would be considered unnecessary now, but after we have grown as a warrior we find that it really was important. Conversely, I think that if we don't set specific goals as such, if we truely progress along the path, the necessary skills will become available without forcing it.



Biggie,

I disagree. Without goals and a means to match ourselves against them, we are merely drifting. In most folks professional lives, no goals also means "Would you like fries with that, sir?".

In the Buj, that often has meant a dissociated and *widely* varied measurement of what skills a Kyu student or even a Godan has, even as far back as 1987. IMHO, There were no discernable means of defining the requirements of rank until fairly recently because there were no clearly defined goals associated with the award of that rank. 'Heart' is a good quality, but heart without technique or skills doesn't protect you and your family.

Yes, I got rank I didn't deserve - and it left me with a crushing need to overperform to feel up to par. Clearly defined goals would have been better and given myself and others concrete things to achieve.

I think we all understand the journey is individual in the macrocosm; however, more of us from the early era are returning and finding a Bujinkan that seems to have drifted, in some places, to a never-never land of "if it feels good dude, just go with the flow" complete with New Age sitar music in the background. It seems, at face value, with no signposts to tell us how to get where we want to be.


Goals are integral to progression in life and specialization is a means to clearly mark a stake in our development as a human being. I did "X" and can point to it. Be it Menkyo Kaiden in one of the Ryuha (which, I have been told and keep reading is forbidden to non-Japanese - something that I never knew until the last 3 weeks and find *grossly* racist - correct me on that if I'm incorrect), or just meeting a set if requirements for a degree or certification I'd say that goals and specialization are GOOD things.


Posted on: 2004/12/8 0:37
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-Chris Watson-
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(1985-1992, 1995-1996, 2002, 2004-??)

"Back in my day, you knew who the real ninja were - the folks wearing cammies!"
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